TAPgiles Dreams Document­ation

Version 4.4.0

# Table of Contents

# Foreword

Hello, Dreamer!

Allow me introduce myself. I am your humble servant TAPgiles. Welcome to my complete documentation for Dreams, by Media Molecule.

I teach the community and help dreamers learn how to create in Dreams. In fact, I’ve been doing this full-time since June 2019—living on savings, and donations from my supporters.

If you’d like to support my work, please go over to Patreon.com/TAPgiles and pledge a few dollars to help pay the bills.

If you’d like more direct help, or want to find out more about what I do and where you can find resources I’ve created, go to TAPgiles.com.

Another big part of this website is my Icons Guide, which lays out all icons available to use in Dreams with features like cross-referenced links to similar icons to help you explore what’s avaialable.

# Tips

For ease-of-use (and ease-of-creation), I’ve made this document a single page. This means you can use your browser’s search functionality to find what information you’re looking for within the whole of Dreams. Try looking in the browser’s menu to try it out. Or CTRL+F or CMD+F usually work as a shortcut to begin searching the page for text.

Headings have a # link at the start, giving you the bookmark link that goes straight to that section. This also means that if you search for # heading name, you’ll get right to that heading!

Each section displays a list of icon links to sub-sections for quick navigation. If you’re familiar with the icons used for gadgets and tabs, you can click right on the one you want to navigate to. Or if you’re using a desktop browser, you can hover over the icon to see where it does.

So then if you want to learn more about the Shadow Angle setting of a text displayer, you can quickly load the page, then click the icons for Gadgets > Text Displayer > Text Properties > Shadow Properties > Shadow Angle.

Each setting has icon links by the heading with more information about how that type of setting works (a slider setting vs a switch setting, for example.) And another to learn about the type of wire it uses (for example, a 3-number wire for a target position input setting).

Slider-like settings also describe the range of the setting, and what their default value is. Look out for when a 0 is highlighted too; that means there’s some special behaviour that kicks in when the setting is at the 0 position. Hover over the 0 to learn more.

Many of these advanced features use JavaScript to add them to the page as you scroll to look at different sections. If you have JavaScript disabled, don’t worry—the page will have all the information you need either way. JavaScript is required only for extra features.

There are video links throughout the text that look like this: (Mm). These will take you to videos on the topics you’re reading about, to help you understand how things work more visually.

# Acknowledge­ments

While I solely write and maintain this document, I couldn’t have got started on such a large project without the help of other dreamers.

First and foremost, my supporters. These kind dreams creators have donated towards my living expenses since the start of my going full-time, and those people have played a big part in making the TAPgiles Dreams Documentation become a reality.

Others of the Dreams teaching community have been a big help also, especially in the early days of writing the first version of this documentation.

I’d like to give a special thanks to LadyLexUK and QuietlyWrong who wrote the DreamSchool documentation articles, which I used as reference for things like setting names and icons when I was away from my PS4.

Throughout this document are links to specific time stamps of videos created by myself and the community. Each such link uses a code to remind you of who made the video. For example (Mm) means Media Molecule made the video that is linked to.

A big thank you to everyone listed below for creating content to help the community. Videos by other creators and teachers were vital to the creation of the early versions of this documentation. Thank you all!

Media Molecule (Mm)Youtube (110), Twitch. PSN: MmOfficial, MmDreamQueen.
TAPgiles (Tg)Youtube (586), Twitch. PSN: TAPgiles, Supposer.
JimmyJules153 (Jj)Youtube (223). PSN: JimmyJules153.
Lucid Stew (Ls)Youtube (1). PSN: Lucid_Stew.
Pookachoo (Pk)Youtube (108). PSN: Pookachoo.
Cutaia (Cu)Youtube (1), Twitch. PSN: cutaia_net.
CuriousCat (Cc)Youtube (23).
Atomtwix (At)Youtube (1).
AmazingOomoo (Ao)Youtube (2).
Bogdan Vera (Bg)Youtube, Twitch (3). PSN: Doepfish.
Aecert (Ac)Youtube (8), Twitch. PSN: Aecert.
NeonTheCoder (Ne)Youtube (1). PSN: NeonTheCoder.
JustinLied (Jl)Youtube (1).

# Gadgets

Contents:

Gadgets do things or show things to the user while powered.

Most gadgets have no effect while completely unpowered and so will not be processed. So unpowering gadgets while they are not needed is good for performance and also for not hitting the performance limits built in to Dreams to keep the scene running. (Tg)

A gadget with a wire going into its power will use the signal going through the wire to decide whether it is powered or not. While it has no wire going into its power, it will use the power button’s state to decide this instead. (Tg)

# Scoped Targetting

Some gadgets have a “Scope” setting, deciding which other gadgets are allowed to be targeted by them depending on where they are in the group structure of the scene. This setting can be “Here,” “Not Here,” and “Everywhere.”

The definition of “Here” is the key to understanding how this scoped targetting works. From the perspective of a gadget seeking targets, a target gadget is considered “Here” if either of the following is true:

  1. The target gadget is in the same group as the seeking gadget.
  2. Or the target gadget is inside a group contained within the same group as the seeking gadget.

The gadgets that have such a setting are: Trigger Zones, Followers, Look At Rotators, Teleporters, Laser Scopes, Health Modifiers, Wireless Transmitters, Variable Modifiers, and Exclusive Gates.

# Action Recorder

Contains the settings:

Action recorders are like many keyframes, with associated times—recording state changes over time and transitioning between states automatically. (Mm)

So while you could have 10 keyframes activated in sequence to move and rotate an object at a certain speed, you could instead use an action recorder to record you moving and rotating that object instead.

When the gadget is selected or its tweak menu is open, anything affected by the recording will display hatch marks over them. (Jj) Press Triangle button on those elements to remove the recorded state from the gadget for that element.

When recording a change in position for an object, a line will be drawn reflecting the movement recorded. Hovering over an object for which a change in position has been recorded will display the path that the recording follows, as well as a white sphere at the beginning and end positions.

Note that any movements are relative to the object’s starting orientation; this means if you flip the object after recording it moving around, the object will move around in a different direction.

Placing a new action recorder will start recording with it. Otherwise, scope in using shift + Cross button to start recording, or use the Start Recording context button. As soon as you begin changing anything in the scene, recording will begin. (Jj) Stop changing things in the scene and the recording will stop until you start changing things again, which will resume recording from the same point. A recorded bar is shown at the top of the screen, the red area representing the time recorded. The bar’s scale will change as time goes on, to fit the time recorded in the same space. (Jj)

If time is running, the recording will begin from the moment you enter recording mode. If time has been paused midway through the gadget’s playback, the changes will be added to the recording from that point onward. Time and playback will also resume when you begin changing things. (Jj) Also, when you stop changing things, the recording will continue but record no state changes until you change things again. These pauses will be shown in the recorded bar as gaps in the red.

If the gadget already has state changes recorded and you activate record mode, you can record more changes to happen in sync with the existing recording. These new changes will be added to the recording. The recorded bar’s current time will show the moment you are adding to the recording. (Jj)

While the recorder is powered and time is running, the recorded states will be applied relative to the starting position of the settings. The face of the gadget will display a vertical bar indicating how far through the recording the gadget currently is. (Jj) When paused, any changes held by the recorder will be undone until time resumes playing.

While recording, press shift +Circle button or click the Stop Recording context button.

Amount powered affects:

The amount of power received multiplies the playback Amplification.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object. 0.005875% gameplay > wires & animation per setting affected (measured using a single gadget).

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

Placing an action recorder on a timeline will replay the recorded state in sync with the timeline. (Mm)

Dragging the right edge holding shift will adjust the playback speed to maintain the gadget’s new width on the timeline.

Scope-in to:

record into the action recorder.

Tweak Menu

# Playback Mode

Playback mode affects how the recording is played back. (Jj)

When looping, the original settings will be restored at the beginning of each playback.

Once

When power goes from non-positive to positive, the clip will play from the beginning to the end—regardless of whether it becomes unpowered or not. (Tg)

Sustain

While powered, the clip will play through from wherever it got to before. When it becomes unpowered, it will pause at that point and stop any playing notes.

Loop

While powered, the clip will play through from wherever it got to before. When it gets to the end, it will resume playing from the start. When it becomes unpowered, it will pause at that point and stop any playing notes.

Ping-Pong

Similar to Loop but when it gets to the end, it will play in reverse to the beginning. Then when it gets to the beginning it will play forwards to the end.

# Animation Speed

Dictates how fast the recording will be played back, relative to the original speed. (Jj)

# Amplification

Modulates the size of the recorded changes—whether that’s size, position, rotation, or setting values. (Jj)

# Springiness

How much the changed values will overshoot their intended position at the end of playback. Higher springiness means the values will overshoot more, and will take longer to bounce around and settle on the final position. Affects position and rotation only. (Jj)

# Reverse

When on, reverses the animation when playing back. So it will effectively start playing from the end toward the beginning.

# Travel

Available:

when in “Loop” mode.

When on, instead of reverting back to the original settings at the start of each loop, the last position of the settings will be used as the origin point for the next playback.

# Keep Changes

When on, will leave all affected settings in the current recorded position. When off, all settings will revert to their original values. (Jj)

Using this on a timeline with blends between keyframes can cause the restoration to compound over time, as it is re-applying it every frame. To fix this, the keyframes on either side of the blend should have Keep Changes set, and the suitable setting recorded into them. (Tg)

# On End Trigger

Sends a pulse when playback has ended. (Jj)

# Advanced Mover

Contains the tabs:

Changes the position of an object over time. (Jj) Provides finer control compared to the Mover gadget.

Gizmo:

The axes to be used by the mover. When local space is on, the axes can be dragged to change their orientation relative to the gadget.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# X Speed, Y Speed, Z Speed

The target speed of the affected objects on the X, Y, and Z axes. (Tg)

When using the modulate blending mode, change the speed of an axis from positive to negative or vice versa to invert that axis.

# Strength

How forcefully the mover overrides physical forces that are acting on the affected objects, such as gravity and friction.

# Damp in X, Damp in Y, Damp in Z

How quickly the object slows down to the target speed. (Jj)

# Local Space

When on, the X, Y, and Z axes will be relative to the rotation of the gadget. When off, the axes will be absolute to the scene’s grid.

# Miscellaneous Outputs

# Affected Objects

This is an output that only connects to objects. Surface-snapping the gadget to an object automatically attaches a wire from this to the object.

# Advanced Rotator

Contains the tabs:

Rotates an object around its centre of mass independently for the three axes.

Note, by using a connector the joint will set the pivot point around which the rotator will rotate the object.
Gizmo:

The rotational axes. Shows circles with rotating lines indicating the speed of the current rotation settings.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# X Axis Speed, Y Axis Speed, Z Axis Speed

The target rotational speed for a given axis.

# Rotation Strength

The amount of force that can be applied to bring an affected object’s rotation to the target rotational speeds.

# Damp in X, Damp in Y, Damp in Z

The gadget’s ability to slow the rotation of an affected object to the target rotational speeds.

# Local Space

When on, allows the gizmo to be rotated using a handle at the end of the X axis and Y axis stalks—setting the orientation of the axes to be used for rotations. The orientation of the gizmo will also be adjusted when the gadget is rotated.

When off, the gadget will use the scene’s default grid orientation.

# Miscellaneous Outputs

# Affected Object(s)

This gadget will affect all objects linked to this output.

# Angle Sensor

Contains the tabs:

Detects the angle the gadget’s location marker is currently at in relation to a target angle range.

Gizmo:

Has a location marker with added features. There is a line from the marker with a sphere at the end showing the aim of the angle sensor. It can be dragged and moved about. This represents the sensor’s centre point. (Jj)

A cone visualises the target range and target falloff surrounding the centre point.

There is also an adjustable arrow pointing at the centre of the target angle range, representing the object’s angle.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Important Properties & I/O (Input & Output)

# Angle Range to Detect

The angle of the core angle range to detect. (Jj)

# Angle Range Falloff

An angle measured from the edge of the core range. (Jj)

If the combined angles of the core and falloff exceed 360 degrees, the angle of the sensed object will not be able to get to 0—as the falloff’s edge cannot be reached.

# Angle Range Met

While the aim is within the core angle range, outputs an “on” signal.

While the aim is within the falloff, a signal will be sent based on how far through the aim is from the edge of the falloff to the core. (Jj)

While more than one object is used to sense from, the highest output will be sent.

# Relative to Object

The centre point will automatically adjust so that it maintains its orientation relative to the linked object. So if the linked object rotates, so does the target’s centre point.

# Miscellaneous

# Sense Angle

The objects whose angle will be sensed.

# Orientation

Sends the orientation of the object.

# AND Gate

Contains the settings:

Only sends an “on” signal when all inputs are “on.” (Jj) More specifically, outputs the signal closest to 0 that it receives. (Mm)

For example, you want to activate a keyframe when the puppet is in a trigger zone and the player is holding Square button. Place an AND Gate, and wire up the trigger zone’s “detected” output to an AND input, and wire up the controller sensor’s Square button output to an AND input. Then wire up the AND output to the keyframe’s power. Now, when the puppet is in the trigger zone and Square button is being held, the keyframe will be powered.

Another way of getting a similar result would be to power a gadget using a signal from another gadget, and using the newly powered gadget’s signal to power whatever other logic. So the final logic will only be powered when the first and second gadgets are powered. (Tg)

For the same example above, the Square button “on” signal would power the trigger zone, and the trigger zone’s output would power the keyframe. So the keyframe can only power on when the puppet is detected in the trigger zone. But the trigger zone can only detect the puppet when the player is holding Square button.
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Number of Ports

The number of used ports. (Ao)

# Inputs

Many inputs used to find the lowest value. If all input values are 1, for example, then the lowest input will be 1.

# Result

Normally used to output 1 when all inputs send 1. Outputs the lowest value signal received.

# Auto Guide

Contains the settings:

Indicates to the Guides system how an object is to be placed, applying certain guide options while moving the object and “obey auto guides” is switched on. The point used for these guides is the object’s grab point. (Pk)

As the only way to set a grab point for an object is for it to be an “Element” type, for the auto-guide to work fully and correctly, the object should be a separate Element-type creation that has been imported.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Grid Snap

When on, the object will use its own grid while being moved.

If the grid is already on, the auto-guide’s grid will be previewed when hovering over the attached object.

If any auto-guides within the element have this turned on, grid snap will be on when obeying auto-guides.

# Grid Size

Available:

when “Grid” is on.

The scale of grid that will be used while moving the object.

When multiple auto-guides exist within the element, the size will default to the grid settings of the edit mode.

# Surface Snap

Dictating how the object should be placed relative to surfaces. (Pk)

If there are multiple auto-guides within the element, a priority order is used. The setting that is earliest in the following list that is selected in any auto-guides within the element will be respected: Snap Orientation, On, Off.

Off:

No surface snapping is active by default.

On:

The object will snap to surfaces.

Snap Orientation:

The object will also rotate such that it’s “upright” direction will point away from the surface’s orientation. Note that the object’s “up” is set by its grab point.

# Stay Upright

When on, the object will always stay upright. (Pk)

If any auto-guides within the object have this setting on, upright will be respected.

# Minimum Scale

The minimum scale allowed for the element. Enforced while obey auto-guides is on and the element is grabbed with L2 or R2. (Pk)

When there are multiple auto-guides within the element, the settings of the auto-guide that was created last will take precedence.

# Maximum Scale

The maximum scale allowed for the element. Enforced while obey audo-guides is on and the element is grabbed with L2 or R2. (Pk)

When there are multiple auto-guides within the element, the settings of the auto-guide that was created last will take precendence.

# Apply To All Parent Groups

Available:

when an old gadget hasn’t had the switch turned off.

The old version of this gadget would apply its settings when moving the object it is attached to, and parent groups of that object. This switch will show as “on” for such gadgets.

A new auto guide gadget will only apply its settings when moving the object it is attached to, and not when moving parent groups.

When turned off, the switch will disappear and the gadget will be upgraded to the new behaviour. The switch will come back only if this action is undone.

# Camera

Contains the tabs:

When turned on, the player’s view changes to the one set by the gadget.

At the start of the scene, the camera that was added to the scene first will become active. When a camera other than the currently active one becomes powered, it becomes the active camera and the view changes accordingly.

While there are no cameras active, the default camera is used instead. If there is a camera in the scene (not in a chip or timeline) and which does not have a wire powering it, then if a possessed object gets close to the edge of the view the default camera will override the camera gadget.

Gizmo:

Has a location marker. When the gadget is selected or its tweak menu is open, a wireframe of the camera’s view (or “frustrum”) is displayed. This shows 4 lines along the 4 corners of the screen for that view, and a rectangle representing the focus depth for the camera. A white dot at the centre of the rectangle is a handle to more easily adjust the viewing angle and focus distance of the camera.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Scope-in to:

go into the view of the camera, and activate certain shortcuts as detailed below. You can also move the view around the scene using normal camera controls. (Jj) (Tg)

When you scope out again, the new view settings will be kept by the camera. Also, the view will keep the same position and orientation. This means if you scope into a camera and out of it again, you can get a sense of what the view will be like, but you can also edit the scene from a similar view to the camera.

# Locking the camera

To lock in a camera to override the default camera, wire a signal into its power or place it into a microchip. (Tg)

# Camera Settings

# Focus Distance

Things at the focus distance away from the camera will be in focus. The further away something is in the scene from this focal distance, the less it is in focus. Though how blurry things can get when not in focus depends on the aperture size. (Jj)

Affects who far away from the gadget the wireframe rectangle is.

# Aperture Size

The wider the aperture, the more blurry things become when not in focus. The narrower the aperture, the less blurry things become when not in focus. (Jj)

# Transition Type

When this camera is made active, dictates how the player’s view transitions from what it was before to this camera and settings. (Jj) Note, this does not affect the transition from this camera to a different camera. (Jj)

Smooth

(Ease In-Out) starts slow, speeds up in the middle, and ends slow. (Jj)

Cut

changes to the new view instantly. (Jj)

Ease In

starts slow and speeds up.

Ease Out

starts fast and ends slow.

Linear

changes at a constant rate.

Crazy

changes further away from this camera before moving towards it.

# Transition Time

Unavailable:

when in “Cut” mode.

How long it takes for the player’s camera to change to this camera after it’s made active. Note, this does not affect the transition from this camera to a different camera. (Jj)

# FOV Angle (Field of View)

The angle from the camera in which you can see the scene. So a narrower angle will zoom in and you’ll see less stuff. And a wider angle will zoom out and you’ll see more stuff. (Jj) (Tg)

Affects the angle of the wireframe lines for the edge of the screen.

# Camera Active

Sends a pulse when the player’s view is at this camera.

# Black Bars

When on, displays black bars like some films. Useful for cut-scenes.

# Imp & Player Settings

# Imp Scale

Unavailable:

if imps are hidden.

The size of the imp relative to its normal size.

# Minimum Imp Distance, Maximum Imp Distance

Note: Figure out what this actually does.
Unavailable:

if imps are hidden.

The range of distance from the camera the imp can be within the scene. Within that range, the imp will slip over sculpt surfaces within the scene. Outside that range, it move over an invisible wall at the maximum distance.

When changing min to greater than max, max will change to the min value. When changing max to less than min, min will change to the max value.

# Follow Imp

Note: How close to the edge of the screen does the imp need to get for the angle to start following?
Unavailable:

if imps are hidden.

An angle the camera may move to follow the imp when the imp nears the edge of the camera’s view. (Jj)

# Disable Controller

When on, no controller input will be processed by the scene. (Jj)

# Hide Imps

When on, no imps will be visible or interact with the scene. (Jj)

# Pitch & Roll in VR

When off and using VR, only the camera gadget’s yaw (looking left/right) will be kept. Its pitch (tilting your head up and down as if nodding) and roll (tilting your head side to side like a cute dog) will be ignored, and the headset’s pitch and roll will be kept.

When on and using VR, the pitch and roll will be used as the base orientation of the player’s view.

This applies to scoping into the camera to move it, while editing in VR.

Another way to think about this is: When off, the headset pitch and roll will override the view. When on, the headset pitch and roll will be added to the camera’s pitch and roll.

# VR Scale

When using VR, the scale of the world in relation to the player’s view. The scale of the gadget itself has no effect.

# Camera Pointer

Contains the settings:

Indicates a direction the default camera should point in. (Tg) Does not affect the view while a camera gadget is active.

When turned on, and there is a possessable controller sensor the default camera is focussed on, the view will change orientation to match the orientation of the gadget. This transition is not instant. (Tg)

Good for giving the player a useful viewing angle for a particular area. (Tg)

The angle used is relative to the rotation of the gadget itself. (Tg) Note that the settings in the tweak menu will change as the gadget rotates.

When multiple pointers are active at once, they will affect the view depending on how close the target controller sensor is to that pointer. (Tg)

The amount the gadget is affecting the view is indicated as a bar on the face of the gadget.
Gizmo:

A white dot showing the position of the pointer. Can be moved or rotated to affect the angle settings of the gadget. Normally resets along the arrow on the gadget’s face.

Also has a blue stalk and circle that can be moved to adjust the “yaw” setting. While moving this part, a transparent circle appears indicating its allowed rotational movement.

A green stalk with a sphere can be moved to adjust the “tilt” setting. While moving it, the same flat circle will display as well as the arc of a circle representing the angle of the tilt.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Sticky

The default camera will stick to the pointer’s position as well as its angle. (Tg)

When this becomes turned on or off during play, the view teleports to the target spot on the X and Z axes, and eases in to the correct height on the Y axis over 1 second.

# Zoom Multiplier

Note: What does this number represent?

How far away from the puppet the view will be while this pointer is active. (Tg)

# Tilt

Rotation around the local X axis of the pointer.

When looking perpendicular to the floor plane, positive looks “down” and negative looks “up.”

# Yaw

Rotation around the Y axis.

# Activation Output

Sends a signal representing how much this gadget is affecting the view, verses other camera pointers.

# Camera Shaker

Contains the settings:

When turned on, moves the active camera left, right, up, and down over time, as if being shaken.

Amount powered affects:

The received power multiplies the Shake Strength.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

Tweak Menu

# Shake Strength

How far to push the camera’s view.

# Shake Speed

How quickly the view changes over time.

# Preview

Demonstrates the current shake settings for 2 seconds.

# Calculator

Contains the settings:

Mathematically combines two values based on the current settings, and gives the result as an output.

Fat wires will have all values affected using the corresponding values from both operands. (Tg) For example, adding (1, 2) to (3, 4) will add 1 to 3, and 2 to 4, giving the fat wire (4, 6).

If one operand is a fat wire value and one is a thin wire or single value, all components of the fat wire will be operated upon. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Operand A

The first value/operand.

# Calculation

The type of operation to perform using the values. (Jj)

Add:

A + B. By wiring the calculator’s result into itself, you can store a particular value indefinitely.

Subtract:

A - B

Multiply:

A × B

Divide:

A ÷ B

Greater Than:

results in 1 if A is greater than B, or 0 if A is not greater than B.

Equal:

results in 1 if A is the same value as B, or 0 if A is not the same value as B.

Less Than:

results in 1 if A is less than B, or 0 if A is not less than B.

Remainder:

(modulous, modulo) divides A into B as many whole times as possible, then outputs what’s left. For example, 7 ÷ 2. 7 can be divided into 3 groups of two, leaving 1 left over. It cannot fill another group of 2 completely, so 1 is the remainder.

Useful for finding how many times a number can go into another number. For example, if you want to find how many tens are in 112, first find the remainder 2, then subtract that from the original number 112 - 2 = 110. This new number will be perfectly divisible by 10. So divide that by 10 (110 ÷ 10 = 11). So there are 11 tens in 112.

Minimum:

Results in the lower of the two values.

Maximum:

Results in the higher of the two values.

Power:

Raises A to the power B.

Round Down:

(floor) Results in A rounded down to the nearest integer.

Round:

Will round down A if its decimal part is lower than 0.5, or rounded up if its decimal part is higher than 0.5.

If the decimal part is exactly 0.5, it would round to the next integer away from 0. So 0.5 rounds to 1, and -0.5 rounds to -1.

Round Up:

(ceiling) Results in A rounded up to the nearest integer.

Absolute:

Results in the magnitude of A. This means if A is less than 0, the result will be more than 0 by the same amount.

For example, if A is -3, the result will be 3. If A is 5, the result will be 5.

# Operand B

Unavailable:

when in “round down,” “round,” “round up,” or “absolute” modes.

The second value/operand.

# Result

Outputs the result of the calculation.

# Combiner

Contains the settings:

A combiner combines multiple values into a single signal, outputting a fat wire.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Type

(See Wire Types.)

Chooses the wire type to combine values into.

Dictates the number of input ports active, their types (for showing the correct icon, tooltip, and sometimes wire colour), and the outputted fat wire’s type. (Jj)

# Controller Sensor

Note: check gizmo
Contains the tabs:

Used to get signals from dualshock 4 controllers. Works for some things with a move controller, but not all.

By default, when a new sensor is placed in the scene a wire is connected from “ Is Dead” to “ Respawn,” and from “ Circle Button” to “ De-possess.”

The first 3 tabs show a Controller Mapping View selector allowing the creator to adjust which icons are shown: dualshock 4 buttons, or the move controller mapping.

Note, this does not affect the behaviour or outputs of the gadget, but the icons only.

The default camera orbits possessable controller sensors, is moved with the right stick and adheres to the “invert camera” setting within Dreams. (Mm)

Pressing Circle button will possess the possessable object closest to the player’s view, even if the imp is hidden.

Note that the outputs from the controller sensor can be overridden by wiring a value into that output. (Tg)

The orientation of the controller sensor will dictate where the orbiting camera will start from. The sensor should face the front of the character, which will cause the orbiting camera to start on the other side facing the back of the character. (Tg)

Gizmo:

Shows a preview of the imp or the axis relative to the possessed object. This can be moved, rotated, and scaled. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.010222222222222223% gameplay > things per object.

# Object Ownership

Note: add note to emitter and test

When an object is possessed through a controller sensor, it, any object contained within it (eg. within a group or surface-snapped to it), and any object emitted by an emitter contained within it is “owned” by it.

This can also be set on sculpt, group, and puppet objects by wire. (See Sculpt > Ownership.)

# Output Settings

Sliders and buttons for controller outputs can be set by wire, which will be passed through to the output.

They can also be set using keyframes or similar recording gadgets. However a button setting cannot be recorded as off, only on. And sliders (eg. R2) will use the higher between the recorded value and its normal output.

Note that these sliders don’t do anything beyond give a visualisation of what the triggers are doing. Any changes made by dragging the slider with Cross button will be immediately overridden by the actual trigger value.

# Controller I/O Page 1

# L2 Button, R2 Button

Sends the amount the trigger is being pulled: 0 for not at all, 1 for when it is pulled all the way, 0.5 for pulled halfway.

# L1 Button, R1 Button, Triangle Button, Square Button, Circle Button, Cross Button

These are on/off buttons with input and output, corresponding to the named buttons on the controller.

# Controller Mapping View

The outputs on this tab map between dualshock controls and move controls in the following way:

Controller

Moves

L2

Secondary motion controller T button

R2

Primary motion controller T button

L1

Secondary motion controller move button

R1

Primary motion controller move button

Triangle button

Primary motion controller triangle button

Square button

Primary motion controller square button

Circle button

Primary motion controller circle button

Cross button

Primary motion controller cross button

# Controller I/O Page 2

# Left Stick, Right Stick

The X and Y values sent are relative to the current view’s angle, for example as through a camera, such that pushing “up” is always pointing away from the current view in scene-space and “left” is always pointing to the left of the current view in scene-space. (Tg)

A custom deadzone can be created using a timeline. (Tg)

# Directional Buttons

The X and Y (or A and B) values given sent are relative to the current view, such as through a camera, such that pushing “up” is always pointing away from the current view in scene-space and “left” is always pointing to the left of the current view in scene-space.

# Motion Sensor

The controller’s axes of tilt in radians, relative to the current player view.

X (camera-relative)

is the pitch (nod) of the controller.

Y (camera-relative)

is the yaw (shake head) of the controller.

Z (camera-relative)

is the roll (barrel roll) of the controller.

# Touchpad Button, L3 Button, R3 Button

Sends a signal while the corresponding button is held down.

# Controller Mapping View

The outputs on this tab map between dualshock controls and move controls in the following way:

Controller

Moves

Left stick

Gyroscope2 + Secondary motion controller T button

Right stick

no mapping

Directional buttons

Face buttons

Motion sensor movement

1Gyroscope

Touch pad press

Motion controllers touch spheres

L3

Secondary sphere to Primary base

R3

Primary sphere to Secondary base

# Controller I/O Page 3

# Left Stick Local, Right Stick Local

The X and Y values are taken directly from the sticks themselves, and are not relative to the current view.

# Up Button, Down Button, Left Button, Right Button

Sends 1 (“on”) while the corresponding button is held.

# Enter, Back

Sends 1 (“on”) while the corresponding customary button for such a function is held.

For example, in Japan Circle button is to enter and Cross button is to go back, whereas in most other places Cross button is to enter and Circle button is to go back.

# Controller Mapping View

The outputs on this tab map between dualshock controls and move controls in the following way:

Controller

Moves

Left stick

Gyroscope2 + Secondary motion controller T button

Right stick

no mapping

Up button

Secondary motion controller triangle button

Down button

Secondary motion controller cross button

Left button

Secondary motion controller square button

Right button

Secondary motion controller circle button

# Camera Properties

The controller sensor has a camera built in and ready to use. It focuses on and revolves around the controller sensor gadget itself.

# Camera Height

Note: What is the percentage referring to? Is this multiplied by the camera distance?

The height relative to the controller sensor that the camera focuses on, multiplied by the current camera distance. (Tg)

# Camera Distance

The desired camera distance from the controller sensor.

If the camera would go inside an object that is visible, it will move closer to the focal point to avoid this.

# Camera Tilt

The tilt around the camera’s X axis (looking up/down) relative to the focal point. So when the value is high, it looks down on the sensor. When the value is a low negative, it looks up towards the sensor. Values go from -57 degrees to 57 degrees.

When the value is 0, the target angle is parallel to the “ground” or X-axisZ-axis plane. (Tg)

By default, this angle can be adjusted while playing using the right stick. As the controller sensor moves though, the camera will try to match the desired angle.

# Field of View

What angle of the view is seen on the screen. High values let you see more of the outer edge of the view as if zooming out. Low values cut out more of the outside edge of the view as if zooming in.

To get an orthographic view for an isometric game for example, use a camera that is very far away with a very low FOV. This will limit the effect perspective has as the camera moves.

# Aperture

Other objects in the scene will be different depths from the camera from any given view. The difference in depth from the camera is used to calculate how blurry they should be. The strength of this blurriness is defined by the aperture. A high aperture means more blur effect.

# VR Scale

(See Camera > VR Scale.)

# Platforming Shadow

Only takes effect when the sensor is surface-snapped to an object.

This darkens all objects to black directly below any visible part of the object the controller is attached to, regardless of a sculpt’s “cast shadows” option. This setting specifies the strength of this effect.

# Offscreen Indicator

When on and multiple players are possessing controller sensors, an indicator is shown at the edge of the screen when this controller sensor’s object is off-screen and the built-in camera is at minimum zoom and cannot let all player-possessed puppets stay on-screen at once. This indicator will flash if the “stay onscreen” setting is turned on (see below).

# Stay Onscreen

When on and the controller sensor is offscreen (see offscreen indicator to see how this is defined), a countdown will be started as set in the global settings gadget. When the countdown is up, that controller sensor will “die.”

# Important Properties & I/O (Input and Output)

Player and imp settings.

# Possession Mode

Dictates how the player can interact with the controller sensor or the attached object.

None:

The player may not possess the linked object. The default camera will ignore this sensor. This is useful for when you have recorded a possession that has effects other than positioning. Deleting the sensor will still allow the recorded positions to work, but any other controller inputs will not. In this mode, the recorded outputs will still fire as normal.

Possessable:

The player may possess the linked object.

Follow Imp:

The player may possess the linked object. Makes the attached object possessable, but it will also follow the imp’s position and orientation on-screen. (Tg)

Remote Control:

Outputs controller signals even though the linked object is not being possessed. Useful for things like menus where there is no object to possess.

# Player 1, Player 2, Player 3, Player 4

When on, a switch allows the corresponding player to interact with the controller sensor.

# ‘Follow Imp’ Behaviour

When using the “follow imp” setting, dictates how the attached object orients itself relative to the imp. (Tg)

Maintain Orientation:

The object will not reorient when possessed to face the camera upright.

Follow Imp:

The object will reorient to match the imp’s normal rotation.

The imp’s back normally faces towards the direction the camera is facing, meaning when the imp is near the left edge of the screen it looks towards the left for example.

Gun Style:

The object will maintain orientation such that the side that faces the camera when it becomes possessed will face towards the camera no matter what angle it’s held at.

In this way, the player can shoot “out” from their view.

# Allow Imp During Possession

When on, the imp will not move to the gizmo, but will move independently of it. Note that even when this setting is on, if the imp is hidden by global settings or the current camera’s settings, the imp will be invisible.

When off, when a controller sensor is possessed, the imp zooms into its gizmo location, makes a “zip” sound and causes whatever object it has possessed to glow momentarily.

# Force Possession

When on, the imp will immediately possess the controller sensor when it becomes powered and the player is not yet possessing a controller sensor. (Tg)

While on, the controller sensor cannot be depossessed.

# Depossess

When triggered, the controller sensor is possessed, and Force Possession is not active, the player depossesses this controller sensor even if the imp is hidden. (Tg)

# Possession Visual

How the imp will be displayed once the attached object is possessed.

Note, if a Hand/Imp Tracker is following the player, the imp will not be displayed by the controller sensor.
Hidden:

Imp will be hidden while the controller sensor is possessed.

Eyes Only:

Imp’s face (eyes and mouth) will be shown while the controller sensor is possessed.

Visible (body on target):

will show the entire imp with its body at the gizmo’s centre.

Visible (tip on target):

will show the entire imp with its tip at the gizmo’s centre.

# Imp Docking Tag

When a Tag gadget’s Scene Space Transform output is wired directly into this, the imp will appear at that transform (including position, rotation, and scale). Tag’s white gizmo will also change into a preview of the imp when possessed.

Note that trying to wire anything apart from a tag’s Scene Space Transform output into this will not be allowed.

# Disable Controls

When sent an “on” signal, the controller sensor will send no outputs from the player that has possessed it.

# Miscellaneous I/O (Inputs & Outputs)

# Possessed

Sends a signal when the controller sensor is currently possessed.

# Player Ownership

Sends a “player info” fat wire regarding who is currently possessing this controller sensor.

# Microphone

Note: Is this just the possessing player, or any player that’s lit up on the IO tab?

Sends the current volume (envelope) being picked up by the possessing player’s microphone.

# Respawn

When triggered, the possessed object is destroyed and recreated in a set position and orientation. (Tg) This position will be the last activated checkpoint if there is one. If there is no such checkpoint active, the original position the object started will be used instead.

# Die

When triggered, the controller sensor permanently stops sending output.

If there is another possessable controller sensor within the scene (such as in a puppet), the camera will move towards it.

# Is Dead

Sends “on” while the controller sensor is in the “dead” state.

# Offscreen Death

Sends a signal when the controller sensor dies as a result of being offscreen for too long.

# Counter

Contains the settings:

Stores an integer value, allowing other signals to change that stored value. (Jj) Displays a progress bar representing how far the current value is from 0 and how near to the target value it is. (Jj)

Useful for setting something to be permanently “on” with a pulse to “count up” or “off” with a pulse to “reset.”

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Target Value

The target integer value.

# Current Count

The current integer value of the counter. Cannot go below 0, or above the target value.

# Counter Full

Outputs “on” while the current value is equal to the target. (Jj)

# Count Progress

Outputs a value between 0 and 1 based on how far through the current value is from 0 to the target. (Jj) current/target

# Count Up

When a signal begins and the current value is lower than the target, increments the current value.

# Count Down

When a signal begins and the current value is higher than 0, decrements the current value.

# Reset

When a signal begins, sets the current value to 0.

# Checkpoint

Contains the tabs:

When respawning, if there is an active checkpoint the player will be spawned at that checkpoint. (Tg)

By default, when a checkpoint detects a possessed controller sensor linked to an object that is or contains a visible sculpt, it will become active and any already-active checkpoint will become inactive.

Gizmo:

The point at which a player will respawn. A puppet will respawn with the centre of its base at this point.

An arrow pointing in the horizontal direction the player and the default camera will look at when spawning or waiting to spawn at this checkpoint.

When the Activate Me setting is unwired, also has a zone gizmo centred around the respawn position which will activate the checkpoint when a possessed, visible shape enters it. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006533333333333334% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties & I/O (Input & Output)

# Activate Me

When sent a non-zero signal, the checkpoint becomes the active one. (Tg)

# Currently Active

Sends an “on” signal while the checkpoint is active. (Tg)

# Just Spawned

Sends an “on” pulse on the frame when something spawns at the checkpoint. (Tg)

# Delay Before Respawn, Delay Next Respawn

When a puppet spawns at this checkpoint, a countdown will begin from Delay Next Respawn. New puppets will only try to spawn here after the countdown is complete.

When a puppet tries to spawn at this checkpoint, it will not spawn until Delay Before Respawn has elapsed.

For example, players Blue and Red have a wire going from their controller sensor’s “is dead” output into its “Respawn” input so that when they die, they will immediately try to respawn.
A player activates a checkpoint with Delay Before Respawn = 10s and Delay Next Respawn = 5s.
If they die soon after each other, the following would happen:

Time

Blue

Red

0s

Dies. Must wait Delay Before Respawn seconds before spawning.

1s

Dies.

10s

Spawns. No player is allowed to spawn for Delay Next Respawn seconds.

15s

Is allowed to spawn, but must wait Delay Before Respawn seconds before spawning.

25s

Spawns.

If one player died later after the first player died, the following would happen:

Time

Blue

Red

0s

Dies. Must wait Delay Before Respawn seconds before spawning.

10s

Spawns. No player is allowed to spawn for Delay Next Respawn seconds.

14s

Dies, but cannot respawn.

15s

Is allowed to spawn, but must wait Delay Before Respawn seconds before spawning.

25s

Spawns.

If the players die long enough after each other, the following would happen:

Time

Blue

Red

0s

Dies. Must wait Delay Before Respawn seconds before spawning.

10s

Spawns. No player is allowed to spawn for Delay Next Respawn seconds.

17s

Dies, and is allowed to spawn, but must wait Delay Before Respawn seconds before spawning.

23s

Spawns.

If the checkpoint was set to Delay Before Respawn = 5s and Delay Next Respawn = 10s, here’s how the same situation would play out:

Time

Blue

Red

0s

Dies. Must wait Delay Before Respawn seconds before spawning.

5s

Spawns. No player is allowed to spawn for Delay Next Respawn seconds.

14s

Dies, but cannot respawn.

15s

Is allowed to spawn, but must wait Delay Before Respawn seconds before spawning.

20s

Spawns.

# Zone Size

Settings work similarly to a trigger zone shape, without falloff. (Tg)

When a possessed controller sensor attached to an object including a visible sculpt enters the zone, the checkpoint will activate.

# Destroyer

Contains the settings:

Removes affected objects from the scene when powered. (Jj)

This is very useful for “tidying up” gadgets that will be unneeded, freeing up gameplay thermo for other objects within the scene. So if emitters are being used either to create these objects or other things in the scene, it’s a good idea to destroy things that will be unneeded. (Tg) (Tg)
For example, when there are multiple options with associated gadgets but only one will be selected, wire destroyers to each possible set, and turn off the destroyer only for the one we don’t want to destroy. (Tg)
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Affected Object(s)

All objects wired to this output will be destroyed by this destroyer when powered.

# Object Destroyed

Sends a pulse when the affected objects have been destroyed.

# Destroy Connected Objects

When on, any objects linked to the affected object via connectors will also be destroyed. In turn, objects connected to those objects will be destroyed, recursively.

# Dialogue Text Displayer

Contains the tabs:

Displays text, along with button options. Allows the player to more easily create branching conversations.

Note, there is no way of hiding dialogue text after it has been shown, other than the player using the close button. Even powering off the gadget will not hide the dialogue.
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.0155% gameplay > things per object.

# Text Properties

# Text Box Properties

# Border Properties

# Alignment

# Settings

# Prompts to Skip/Close

# Prompt to Skip

While not all the text is shown, this setting dictates which button can be used to skip the animation of this text.

None

This dialogue cannot be skipped by default.

Circle

The player can use the Circle button button to skip the dialogue.

Cross

The player can use the Cross button button to skip the dialogue.

Square

The player can use the Square button button to skip the dialogue.

Triangle

The player can use the Triangle button button to skip the dialogue.

Up

The player can press Up button on the dpad to skip the dialogue.

Left

The player can press Left button on the dpad to skip the dialogue.

Right

The player can press Right button on the dpad to skip the dialogue.

Down

The player can press Down button on the dpad to skip the dialogue.

# Prompt to Close

Once the text is fully shown, this dialogue can be closed. This setting dictates which button lets the player close the dialogue.

Note it will take a moment to actually hide the dialogue after the button has been pressed.
None

This dialogue is not closeable by default.

Circle

The player can use the Circle button button to close the dialogue.

Cross

The player can use the Cross button button to close the dialogue.

Square

The player can use the Square button button to close the dialogue.

Triangle

The player can use the Triangle button button to close the dialogue.

Up

The player can press Up button on the dpad to close the dialogue.

Left

The player can press Left button on the dpad to close the dialogue.

Right

The player can press Right button on the dpad to close the dialogue.

Down

The player can press Down button on the dpad to close the dialogue.

# Show Prompt in Text

When on, displays prompts next to the dialogue for skipping or closing when those controls are applicable.

# Dialogue Properties

# Imp Text Prompts

When on, the imp can be used to select a prompt.

# Circle Prompt, Cross Prompt, Square Prompt, Triangle Prompt, Up prompt, Down prompt, Left Prompt, Right Prompt

Options the player can choose from.

# Inputs & Outputs

# Start Text

If this is wired into, the gadget will not show anything on the screen.

While a positive signal is received, the gadget will start rendering and animating the text where necessary.

# Text Finished

Sends a pulse when the player uses the Close button. Often wired into the next dialogue gadget’s “Start Text” input to continue the conversation.

# Text Active

Text is considered “active” while the gadget is powered and either no wire is plugged into “Start Text” or that wire is sending a positive signal.

Sends a 1 while active.

# Text Animation Finished

Sends a signal while the text is active and the animation is complete.

# Text Animating

Sends a signal while the text is active and the animation is not yet complete.

# Text Animation Progress

Sends a percentage for how far through the animation the gadget currently is.

Can be set in the same way.

For example, sending 0.2 into this will show 20% of the characters.

# Doorway

Contains the tabs:

Used to exit the current scene, as well as link scenes together within a Dream. (Jj) (Tg)

Within a Dream, the doorway type icon will be used to indicate what kind of doorway it is. The name of a doorway gadget will also be used as a tooltip on the doorway node when editing a Dream.

Note that the wipe of a doorway will be used to transition out of the current scene and transition into the next scene.

In a dream map, when a doorway is linked to another doorway it is referencing that specific doorway gadget. Therefore, if you emit a doorway, that is a new copy of the doorway gadget and not the same gadget that was linked. And so that doorway will not be directed through that link.
Gizmo:

Has a location marker with an arrow coming from it. This dictates where the player will spawn (for puppets, where the centre of the purple base will be positioned) and the direction they will face.

When this doorway was used to let the player enter the scene, the controller sensor the player was possessing in the previous scene will be checked for a name. (And so, this feature will not kick in for the first scene a player starts from in a dream.) If it had a name assigned to it, a controller sensor is found in the doorway’s scene that has the same name. If there is one, on the second frame of the new scene it is automatically possessed, and its linked object is teleported to the gizmo’s location. (Jj) If there are more than one, the controller sensor created first will be targetted.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object. 1 of 20 gameplay > doorways per object.

# Properties & Output

# Doorway Type

Dictates the kind of doorway this is for the scene, and how it can be used. (Jj)

Entrance

This doorway can be used to enter the scene from elsewhere. Links can be made to an entrance within a Dream from an exit or two-way node.

Exit

This doorway can be used to go out of the scene to somewhere else. Links can be made from an exit within a Dream to an entrance or two-way node.

Two Way

This doorway can be used to enter the scene or exit the scene. Links can be made to any other doorway node.

# Doorway Activated

Sends a pulse when the doorway was used to enter the scene, even if the gadget is powered off.

When playing a scene not from a dream, the entrance or two-way doorway created earliest will be considered to be the active one.

When editing a scene with an entrance or two-way doorway gadget, the one considered active will show this setting as sending a signal.

# Wipe Effects

# Checkpoints

# Checkpoint Mode

Unavailable:

when the doorway type is “exit.”

When entering the scene through this doorway, the respawn point will be set to its gizmo. Checkpoint gadgets will take over as normal.

Note that this has no effect when entering from a different dream.

# Just Spawned

Pulses “on” when a player spawns from this doorway. (Jj)

# Emitter

Contains the tabs:

Use the attached object button to connect the emitter to an object within the scene. That object will now disappear, and will be emitted by the gadget at the right time.

Useful for controlling thermometer use. Before any instances have been emitted, only one lot of gameplay/graphics/audio thermometer memory will be used. When an object is emitted, this can be added to. When an object is destroyed, this can be reduced. So if you use emitters and destroyers in smart ways, you can control how much memory is being used at a given time within the game. (Tg) (Jj) You can then communicate with the emitted logic from the originating object if needed. (Tg)

Note, however, that this is only effective and useful in certain circumstances. Generally, it’s useful for instances where you have a lot of instances of logic but don’t need all of it to be running at all times. But for graphics stuff such as having many sculpts in a scene this technique is not so useful.

(Tg)

If you’d like to see the emitted object, turn off Preview Invisibility. (Mm) Then, if you’d like to edit it, you can scope into the object like it was a group and even take things in and out of the emitted object.

Copying an emitter will use the same source object to emit, which means it will not increase thermometer cost for the source object to emit. This also means that if you edit the source emitted object the objects that the emitter copies will emit will also update. (Tg)

Note that copying an emitter and the reference object will actually make a copy of that reference object, adding to the thermometer cost. So unless you want to be able to change that new copy separately from the original emitter reference, it’s generally best to copy the emitter only and have the emitted object stored safely somewhere in your scene.

Once it’s attached to the emitter, you can move, rotate, and scale the emitted object without affecting how it will be emitted. (Mm)

Once an object is attached to the emitter to be the emitted object, it will be turned off and so become invisible. Turn off preview invisibility to see a ghost image of it. You can now scope in to that object, or take things in to the object, etc. and these changes will be reflected by what is emitted by the emitter.

When an initial rotation is set, a white circle with moving radial lines will appear to indicate the initial rotation when an object is emitted. Attached to that is a line with a blob at the end. Drag the blob to adjust the axis around which the rotation occurs.

While the tweak menu is open, a preview of the emitted object will be shown at the position, scale, and rotation it will be emitted at.

The emitter will use the centre point of the original object to emit from. You can however manipulate where this centre point is in relation to the object you want to emit. (Tg)

A good way of emitting animated effects is to place a destroyer in the timeline within the emitted object that will destroy the entire emitted object once the effect is no longer visible. (Tg)

The emitted object will immediately run any logic it contains, so it can completely change form even after being emitted. (Tg)

Gizmo:

Has a location marker. It may be moved to dictate where the object will be emitted. When an object is first attached, the location marker moves to the object’s original position.

It also displays an arrow, indicating a direction. The emitted object will move in that direction, depending on the settings.

A red dashed line is shown leading to the current centre of the reference object (not the centre currently used by the emitter). A white dashed line leads to the position of where the object will be emitted.

The gizmo can be animated to emit objects in different places using the same emitter. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.007230769230769231% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# Object to Emit

Click on it and then an object in the scene to link the object to the gadget. Press Triangle button to unattach the attached object. (Jj) (Tg)

The attached object will have its power turned off. When emitting, a copy of the current state of the object will be used and its original power state will be restored for the emitted copy. This means you could turn the power on for the reference object and allow it to change live. Then when it is emitted, the state it has at the moment the emit takes place will be used for the emitted copy. (Tg)

Note, as the reference object is powered off it will normally disappear from view. But it is still in the scene, still uses thermo, and importantly is still editable by turning off Preview Invisibility. (Tg)

Note that the centre of the object is found at the time it is linked, based on the bounds of all contained objects. The true centre could change after that, but the centre used to emit the object will not change. (Tg)

# Emit Speed

The initial speed of the object along the specified direction. (Jj) If this is non-zero, the emitted object will behave as if it was “movable” turned on. (Tg)

Note that this can be set to 0, and the object will still be able to move—for example by using a Mover or simply setting it to be movable. (Tg)

# Rotation

The initial rotation speed of the object. (Jj) If this is non-zero, the emitted object will behave as if it was “movable.” (Tg)

# Ignore Parent Speed

When on, the initial speed will be used absolutely. When off, the initial speed will be added to the speed of the gadget. (Jj) (Tg)

# Time Between Emits

When in continuous mode, specifies how long to wait before emitting a new object both after becoming powered and after each emitted object. (Jj) (Tg)

When at 0 seconds, a new object will be emitted each logic frame (30 frames per second).

# Emit Mode

Dictates when objects are emitted while powered.

Once:

One object will be emitted the moment the emitter receives power. (Jj) (Tg)

Continuous:

Objects will be emitted as often as allowed by the emitter’s settings while receiving power. (Tg)

Note that a pause of [Time Between Emits] happens after being powered before the first copy is emitted. (Tg)

# Local Space

When on, the orientation of the direction they are launched in or rotate around are relative to the orientation of the gadget and so will rotate when the gadget rotates. (Tg)

When off, the orientation is absolute to the scene and will not change of the emitter is rotated.

# Emitted Object Lifetime

When emitted, the new copy will be destroyed this amount of time later. (Jj) (Tg)

# Max Emitted at Once

The maximum number of objects emitted by this gadget that can exist at once time. (Tg)

While there are already the specified number of objects emitted from this gadget still existing within the scene, no more objects will be emitted unless Recycle Emitted Objects is on. (Jj)

# Max Emitted

The maximum number of objects that can be emitted by this emitter, regardless of any being destroyed. (Tg)

If there have already been the specified number of objects emitted during the entire lifetime of the scene, this gadget will not emit any more objects. (Jj)

# Recycle Emitted Objects

When on, instead of not emitting when the “Max Emitted at Once” number is reached, the oldest emitted object still existing will be destroyed and a new object will be emitted. (Jj) (Tg)

# Inputs & Outputs

# Object Emitted

Sends a pulse each time the emitter emits an object. (Tg)

Note that if Time Between Emits is 0 and a new copy is emitted every frame, the output of this setting will be the equivalent of a solid signal.

# Scene Space Direction

If the emitter sets an initial speed to the emitted object, it will give it that speed in this direction. (Tg) (Tg)

# Scene Space Transform

Sets the transform in the scene that the object will emitted at. This is great for putting a piece of logic at a position within the scene. (Tg) (Tg)

# Destroy Emitted Objects

When the input signal becomes positive, all objects the emitter has emitted are destroyed. (Tg)

This can be triggered even if the gadget is unpowered.

# Preserve Wires

When on, emitted objects will have wires added that were connected to the original object. (Tg)

# Effect Field

Contains the tabs:

Only available by searching for effect fields in Sound Mode. (Tg)

Effect Fields adjust the corresponding settings of sound gadgets they affect. (Mm) Effect Fields can be wired up to logic, as with any other gadget. (Mm)

Most of the sound gadget’s settings can be found in this gadget’s tweak menu, and so can be manipulated by the effect field. (Mm) When affecting a note, that note’s settings have the effect field’s settings added to it. (See Sound.)

While affecting a note, the field shows ripples emanating out from the centre.

Note, as well as performing notes in an effect field to be affected by it, notes can be moved into the field to be affected by it. Using this technique, some notes or drums can have completely different settings applied to them. (Tg)

While the tweak menu is open, circles appear for the inner and outer ranges of the field. Drag these with R2 to adjust. Also a small circle on the outer edge is shown. Drag this to adjust the angle the wave will move across, and the width of the wave iterations themselves.

Gizmo:

While in a performance window, only shows while the gadget is tweaked. The Inner Radius and Outer Radius can be dragged visually, as well as a small node that controls the angle and density of the waves. (Tg)

When not in a timeline and using Positional mode, has a core and falloff zone.

Amount powered affects:

The amount the gadget is powered affects how strongly these settings are applied to affected sounds.

While on a timeline:

Affects everything within that timeline while it is active. The time it is active is indicated by that time period being highlighted as a column. (Mm) Effect fields do not affect parent or child timelines or instruments. (Mm)

To restrict the effect to only affecting some sounds within the timeline, you can add another timeline into the timeline and place the effect and the sounds you want to be affected by it in that nested timeline.

Note, affects gadgets in the same chip, timeline, and notes played in the same performance window. But not gadgets within child chips, timelines, or notes played in sound gadgets nested within performance windows.

# Options

# Colour

The colour of the gadget and its field.

# Inner Radius

The size of the inner radius of the field, where the effect applies most strongly to notes. Similar to the Core of a trigger zone.

Cannot be higher than the Outer Radius.

When Positional is on and using the Sphere zone shape, this is used as the core size of the zone.

# Outer Radius

The size of the outer radius of the field. While a note is further towards the outer edge, the effect will affect the audio less. While a note is further towards the inner edge, the effect will affect the audio more. Similar to the Falloff of a trigger zone.

When going below the Inner Radius, pushes the Inner Radius to the same value.

When Positional is on and using the Sphere zone shape, this is used as the falloff size of the zone.

# Upper Height in Timelines, Lower Height in Timelines

Available:

when in a timeline.

When in a timeline, how many rows above or below the effect field gadget will be affected by it.

# Positional

When on, the gadget affects sound gadgets within the scene, much like a trigger zone. (Mm) (Tg)

This includes the LFO wave.

# Zone Shape

(See Trigger Zone > Zone Shape.)
Unavailable:

when “positional” is off.

Affects all sound sources within the zone.

You can animate gadgets moving in and out of the effect field, to perform such changes. (Mm)

Has the Sphere and Scene options. (Tg)

# Movement

The term “LFO” is now used in this tab, standing for Low Frequency Oscillator. This refers to a value changing over time like a wave, in this case how much the effect field is being applied.

# ADSR

Similar to the ADSR setting of a sound gadget, but affecting how much effect the gadget has on the note over time. (Tg)

Note, there is no Release in this setting.

# LFO Depth

How non-effective the field can get in the low parts. (Tg)

# LFO Rate

How fast the wave moves across the field. (Tg)

While LFO Beatsync is on, becomes an integer locked to musically useful tempos: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 32, and 64.

# Wave Shape

The shape of the wave moving across the field. (Tg)

Sine:

A steady sine wave.

Each iteration starts low, goes high, and ends low.

Sandcastle:

A sine wave separated into high (100%), medium (50%), and low (0%) bands.

Square:

A sine wave separated into high (100%), and low (0%) bands.

High begins at 1/6 of the iteration, and ends at 4/6 of the down-swing.

Ramp:

Starts high and moves to low linearly through one iteration.

Random Smooth:

Goes up and down randomly, with smooth sine-like transitions.

Random Step:

Goes up and down randomly, with stepped square-like transitions.

# Beatsync LFO

When on, each wave cycle will be some whole fraction of the beat. Randomised wave shapes will be seeded, meaning the randomised “height” of the wave (how positive or negative the wave is) will be the same for any effect field and the same every time that effect field is played.

When in a timeline or sound performance window, the tempo of this beat will be inherited from the containing gadget.

# Bipolar LFO

The field’s settings will be added to the sound’s settings at the highest point of the wave.

When on, at the lowest point of the wave the field’s settings will be subtracted from the sound’s settings at the lowest point of the wave.

When off, at the lowest point of the wave the field’s settings will have no effect on the sound’s settings at the lowest point of the wave.

# Reverse LFO

When on, the high and low points of the wave are inverted.

# Exclusive Gate

Contains the settings:

When a gate is open, allows a signal through it. Only one gate with the same name, depending on certain rules. (Ac) On the face of the gadget, a gate icon shows if that gate is currently open or closed.

In this way there are similarities to the Selector gadget, for which only one channel can be active at a time.

Exclusive gates are grouped by the name of the exclusive gate gadget. (Tg) Each group can have at most one open gate within it.

For example, exclusive gate “A” will be part of the same group as another exclusive gate named “A” but not part of a group containing exclusive gate “B.”

Note that in edit mode, gates may show themselves to be open based on sending inputs and such before playing time. But when time is played, everything will be reset and the correct state will be shown.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Which gate is active?

The process used to figure out which gadget should be open/active is a little complex. And even more tricky to guess at through experimentation—which I’ve done a lot of.

Note that, honestly and truthfully, you generally don’t need to know how this works to this detail unless you’re finding weird edge cases. For 99% of cases, an understanding of roughly what the settings do will be enough to use exclusive gates just fine.

Here are some sources you may find useful, to understand the innards. Explanation from Mm. Explanation on DreamSchool.

When a gate is open (or “active”) the received signal is output.

While a gate is on (even if it was recently closed) and it has a positive signal being sent to it, it will be considered available to be opened next.

When an open gate has a lower priority than another available gate, it is automatically closed.

While there is no gate that is open and has sync off, and there are no open gates, the correct gate is checked for every frame. According to the following rules. Each stage reduces the pool of allowed gates until only one is left, at which point that gate is opened. It looks for:

  • Gates that are powered, have a positive signal being sent to it, and have sync on.
  • Gates that have interrupt on, unless no gates have interrupt on.
  • Gates that have the highest priority.
  • Gates in queue mode that have received the highest signal at any point while waiting to be opened, unless no gates are in queue mode.
  • Gates in queue mode that were opened the longest time ago, unless no gates are in queue mode.
  • Gates that have the highest value being sent to them.
  • The gate that was created most recently.

When an open gate is powered off it retains its open status. When turned on again it will close any open gates and stay open itself.

If in queue mode, a new gate will be found from the open-request pool. Otherwise the incoming signal must be non-positive for the gate to close.

Tweak Menu

# Gate Input

The signal to output when the gate is open.

While receiving a positive signal, this gate is requesting to be opened. (Tg)

# Gate Output

Sends the input signal, while the gate is open. (Tg)

# Gate Sync

This is an input. With no wires connected to it, defaults to on.

While on, the gate will open and close as dictated by the other settings. While off, the gate’s state will not change unless there are no other gates in the priority pool. (Ac) (Tg)

Changing priority of this gate, or activating “interrupt” on another gate will override this behaviour while gate sync is off.

# Close Gate

Note: The gate can be closed like this while the input is not 0, but strange things can happen?

Does not work in “Automatic” mode.

When triggered, the gate will be closed. (Ac) (Tg)

# Active

Sends a signal while this gate is currently open. (Tg)

# Priority

If a gate could turn on and it has a higher priority than any other gate that could turn on, this gate turns on. (Ac) (Tg)

While sharing the highest priority with other gates, the value received into Gate Input is used to break the tie. (Tg)

When a gate that is receiving a positive value has a higher priority that the currently active gate, that gate is closed and this gate is opened.

Note, the priority is rounded down to the nearest integer.

# Scope

(See Trigger Zone > Detection Scope.)

Only has “Here” and “Everywhere” options.

Note that to determine what exclusive gates are “Here,” the exclusive gates must be in the same exact group; gadgets inside groups within the same group are not considered “Here.”

# Interrupt

Note: Double check this.
Available:

when in “Queue” mode.

When triggered and this gate has the same priority as other gates in the queue, this gate skips to the next one in the queue. (Tg)

If a positive signal is currently being input to the gate, this gate becomes open and all others close. If the input signal is 0, this gate will be the next one to open. (Ac)

# Reset Mode

Sets when this gate will be reset.

Automatic

If a gate’s input signal is positive it will be open while no other powered gates with the same name are open. (Ac) When the input signal becomes non-positive and the gate is open, it will close itself automatically. (Tg)

If a gate was open when powered off, it will remember that. When it is powered back on, it will become open again and close all other gates.

Manual

A gate will remain open until the Close Gate input is triggered. (Ac)

Queue

Works like manual mode. However, a gate will open only if it has opened the same number of times or fewer than all other gates of the same name. (Ac) (Tg)

# Gate Colour

Sets what colour the gadget will appear. (Tg)

# Exclusive OR Gate

Contains the settings:

Also known as a “XOR” gate.

When only one value is positive, that value is sent. For example, when only one input is sending a signal, it will send a signal out. (See Result.)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Number of Ports

The number of used ports.

# Inputs

Many inputs checked.

# Result

Normally used to send 1 when only one of the inputs are receiving a 1.

Outputs a received value when it is greater than 0, and all other received values are 0.

# Fog

Contains the tabs:

Adds light-absorbing particles within a specified zone. (Tg) While the view is within the fog, it’s easier to see that the particles take the form of tiny translucent flecks. These flecks are the same type used for the sky. These particles linger in the scene even as the fog is moved.

While the fog gadget is selected or its tweak menu is open, a zone is shown for where the fog is placed within the scene. While hovering over the tweak menu however, it is hidden so you can see the fog itself better.

Amount powered affects:

The Density is multiplied by the power received.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006266666666666667% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# Tint

The colour of the fog.

# Hue Shift

Shifts the hue of the colour of the fog.

# Density

How much light the fog absorbs and blocks from getting through the fog.

# Noise Strength

How much the noise reduces the density of the areas it affects.

# Noise Scale

How much the noise pattern is scaled up from the centre of the fog area.

# Noise Speed

How quickly the noise changes over time.

# Glow

How much the fog glows. If the fog looks a bit dingy because it is not catching enough light to appear the true colour you have set, increase the fog a little.

# Zone Size

# Follower

Contains the tabs:

Moves the attached objects towards or away from a target position.

Gizmo:

Has a location marker. The gadget uses this location relative to the gadget as the point to move towards or away from the target position. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Important Properties

# Follow Mode

Dictates how the gadget moves objects relative to the target position.

Follow

will move the attached object towards the target.

Flee

will move the attached object away from the target.

# Speed

The target speed of the object as it travels towards the target. If no target is found, the speed used is 0.

# Strength

The gadget’s ability to overcome other physical forces such as gravity and friction.

# Damping

The gadget’s ability to slow the object once it reaches the target.

# Tag Name

The name of the tag to use as the target. (Tg) Only the closest valid tag will be targetted. (Tg)

While a tag is targeted in this way it is considered detected.

# Scope

(See Trigger Zone > Detection Scope.)

# Strength & Damping Specifics

# Min. Distance, Max. Distance

Unavailable:

when “Target Position” has an input wire.

The tag’s position must be further away than the minimum distance and closer than the maximum distance to be considered a valid target. (Tg)

If min is changed to be greater than max, max will be set to the min value. If max is changed to be lower than min, min will be set to the max value.

When these values are set by received signals they will not adjust the other slider when out of range, but instead only be allowed to set the value within the set constraints.

# X, Y, and Z Strength

Affects the strength in particular axes. (Tg)

This can be used, for example, to keep a character on the same plane as a tag for a 2D platformer while not affecting movement in other directions. (Tg)

# X, Y, and Z Damping

Affects the damping in particular axes.

# Follower Direction Damping

Affects damping towards the target.

# Inputs & Outputs

# Affected Object(s)

The objects to move.

# Target Position

When set, the follower will try to move the affected objects such that the follower’s position is at the target position. (Tg) (Tg)

Can be used to put some object at the same position as the camera. (Tg)

# Found Target

Sends “on” while a target is being used.

# Force Applier

Contains the tabs:

Applies force to movable sculpts or the start points of strokes within physical paintings. (Mm)

Can be used to influence the physics a little to make things look more random and natural. (Tg)
Gizmo:

Has a location marker as the source of the force. When in “Directional” mode, an arrow is also displayed that you can drag to set the direction of the force.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Important Properties

# Force Strength

The intensity of the force applied to objects.

# Force Speed

Note: What exactly does this “speed” represent in physics terms?

The speed of the force applied to sculptures. (Tg)

# Force Speed On Strokes

The speed of the force applied to paintings that have “physical” enabled.

# Force Mode

Whether the force will pull things towards the position or push things away from the position.

Push

(up arrow) will apply force away from the source, like a blowing wind.

Pull

(down arrow) will apply force towards the source, like gravity.

# Force Type

How the force vector will be calculated.

Radial

will push or pull things from the source point.

Directional

will push or pull things along a particular direction, regardless of where the object is in relation to the source point.

# Target Position

Available:

when in Radial mode.

Sets the location of the source of the force independently to the centre of the zone where the force is applied.

# Force Applied

Sends “on” while an object is being affected by the force.

# Local Space

When on, direction will be relative to the gadget’s orientation. When off, direction will stay constant regardless of the gadget’s oritantion.

# Zone Size

# Labels

# Global Settings

Contains the tabs:

Contains settings that apply to the scene as a whole.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Settings 1

# Adjust Gravity, Gravity Strength

When on, activates the gravity strength slider. This will adjust gravity across the entire scene.

Note that the puppet settings define how high the puppet can jump as opposed to the amount of force applied when jumping. The force applied when jumping is calculated using the current gravity setting, to ensure this jump height.

# Adjust Fall Height, Max fall Height

Note: What if the fall is affected by movers or forces? When exactly does this kick in?

When on, activates the Max Fall Height slider.

If a possessed puppet has nothing beneath it within the set distance, Puppet Interface gadgets inside it will send a signal from “fell out of scene,” and the default camera will no longer follow it on the Y axis (up and down).

# Adjust Camera Zoom, Multiplayer Max Camera Zoom

Note: Test to figure out what this setting does exactly.

When on, activates the Multiplayer Max Camera Zoom slider. This dictates the maximum distance away from all players the camera can go.

# Adjust Offscreen Timeout, Multiplayer Offscreen Timeout

Note: Test to make sure.

When on, activates the Multiplayer Offscreen Timeout slider. This dictates how long a player can be offscreen before their puppet dies.

# Camera Boundary

Note: How are the “boundaries” of the scene decided?

When on, activates the Camera Boundary Distance slider. This dictates how far outside of the bounds of the scene the player can go before the camera will stop following them.

# Settings 2

# Allow Imps

When off, hides the imp regardless of other settings. If no camera or possessable controller sensor is in the scene, the imp can still be used to “grabcam” around the scene even though the imp is hidden.

# Max Players

Note: If players are already connected, what order are they ignored in? Reverse order they connected? Player “number”?

Dictates the maximum number of players that can be active in the scene at once. Controllers for players beyond this number can still pause the game with the Options button.

If this is set to 0, no players can have any control within the scene.

# Number of Players

Sends the number of players currently connected to the PlayStation.

# Camera Transform

Sends the current view’s transformation details, regardless of transitions, which camera gadget is being used, if no specific camera is being used, etc. (Tg) (Tg)

# Reset Scene

When it receives an “on” signal, resets the scene including logic, position of objects, etc. as if it were freshly loaded. Anything that was emitted will be removed. The values of any persistent variables will not be saved, but will be reset to whatever values were stored before the scene was initially loaded.

The player’s view will fade into a view of the reset scene.

# Is In VR?

(See Head/Camera Tracker > Is In VR?.)

# Grab Sensor

Contains the settings:

Detects imp interactions with the attached object. Note that these interactions are not restricted to grabs only, though the tooltips talk about these interactions as grabs.

When playing with the moves, only the primary imp triggers signals from this gadget.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# No. of Players Required

(Number of Players Required)

For any interaction sensed by this gadget, the number of imps from different players must meet or exceed the number specified. (Jj)

# Set Grab Point

When on and a player grabs the associated object, their imp or tracker will use the grab point gizmo’s position and orientation.

# Sense Grab

Multiple objects may be connected to this input at the same time. Any objects attached to the gadget will be used to sense imp interactions. (Jj)

Note that only hovering will be sensed for paintings.

Good for easily making a button the player can “click” with R2. Or allowing an object to move only while it is grabbed. (Tg)

# Grabbed

Sends a signal when an attached sculpt is grabbed that also has the “grab” imp interaction enabled. (Jj) (Jj)

# Hovered

Sends a signal when an attached object is hovered over. (Jj) (Jj)

# Imp Stretch

Sends a signal when an attached sculpt is being grabbed and pulled on. The strength of the signal between 0 - 1 reflects how far away the imp is from the grab point, and therefore how hard they are pulling the object. distance from grab/max stretch length (Jj)

The value 0 is given when the imp not any distance away from the grab point.

The value 1 is given when the imp is as far away from the grab point as is possible.

# Grade & Effects

Contains the tabs:

Affects how the entire view looks for the player in many different ways.

Amount powered affects:

The received power is used as the weight of the blend (averaging) with other gadgets. If fully powered, it will average evenly. If powered very little, it will not affect the settings very much.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006533333333333334% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

# Light & Colour

# Brightness

Increases or decreases the overall brightness. (Jj)

# Contrast

Increases or decreases the contrast between light and dark colours. High contrast means dark colours become darker and light colours become lighter. Low contrast means dark colours become lighter and light colours become darker, heading towards a 50% grey. (Jj)

# Saturation

Increases or decreases the saturation of the colours. Low saturation means colours become more grey. High saturation means the colours become more intense. (Jj)

# Hue Cycle

Cycles all colours through the “colour wheel.” For example, increasing this slider pushes reds to yellow, then green, then blue, then purple, and back to red.

# Colour Tinting

Adds a colour tint to parts of the view depending on their brightness. (Jj)

# Shadows, Mid-Tones, Highlights

Darker shades will be more affected by the shadows tint. Mid-tone shades will be more affected by the mid-tones tint. Brighter shades will be more affected by the shadows tint.

These colours are set to 50% grey, which does not affect the colours at all. Any given colour will be adjusted the same amount as the setting is. The further a setting is from 50% grey the more intense the tint grade will become.

Wire a value into colour tint with the “modulate” wire-blend mode to control the brightness of the colour beyond the normal range.

# Screen Effects

Has options for a vignette and other effects.

A vignette is like a shadow around the edges of your screen—though using the settings, this “shadow” can be any colour.

# Vignette Colour

Dictates the colour of the vignette effect when visible. (Jj)

# Vignette Strength

The opacity of the vignette. (Jj)

# Bloom

Light will “bleed” out of bright objects within the screen, making halos appear around these objects. (Jj)

# Lens Flare

Similar to bloom, but produces a line of light as if refracting through physical lenses in a camera. (Jj)

# Grain Effect

Adds a randomised, ever-changing noise to the view, making pixels slightly brighter or darker than they normally are—as if filmed on an old camera, or one that does not work so well in low light. (Jj)

# Sharpen/Blur

Sharpen makes pixels have more contrast near boundaries where colours change. Blur makes each pixel the average of nearby colours. (Jj)

# Motion Blur

When objects move within the view, they will blur in that direction—like watching things go by quickly in a car. (Jj)

# Camera Movement Blur

Blurs the entire view depending on the speed of the camera movement. (Jj)

# Pincushion

Warped the view from the centre of the screen. Increasing bulges out the middle and the corners are pulled inward, leaving black corners—similar to a fish-eye camera. Decreasing pinches the middle and the corners are pulled outward. (Jj)

# Hue Selectivity

# Hue Selectivity

How narrow the range of colours is that are affected by the settings on the first two tabs. At 0%, all colours are affected equally. At 100% only a narrow range of hues are affected.

Note that less selective grade gadgets will be overridden by more selective grades for the colours they select for. Using this, you can easily make all colours desaturated apart from one. (Tg)

# Hue Affected

The hue around which a band of colours are affected.

# Pixelation & Glitch Effects

# Resolution

Has 2 inputs and 2 outputs for X and Y pixelation.

The left-right axis dictates the x-resolution of the view from high (unaffected) on the left to high on the right. The down-up axis dictates the y-resolution of the view from high (unaffected) at the bottom to low at the top. (Jj)

# Scan Lines

Dictates the opacity of darker horizontal lines across the view. These lines are affected by the pincushion setting. (Jj)

# Posterise

Reduces the number of colours shown in the view. Colours are rounded to the nearest allowed colour. (Jj)

# Chromatic Aberration

Note: Are these channel scaled up from the centre of the screen?

Pushes the red green and blue colours outward relative to the centre of the view. Gives an old-school dodgy TV vibe. (Jj)

# Glitch

Has 2 inputs and 2 outputs for glitch X and glitch Y.

Adds VHS-style glitchiness to the view. The X axis adds more X-oriented glitch the further right you go, and the Y-axis adds more Y-oriented glitch the further up you go. (Jj)

Y-glitch adds lighter horizontal flecks to the view and warping at the top and bottom, as well as moving the entire view vertically from time to time.

X-glitch adds horizontal ghosting to the view, as well as subtle lighter and darker horizontal bars moving up over the image.

# Gyroscope

Contains the tabs:

Keeps an object oriented “upright.” (Tg)

Gizmo:

An arrow pointing in the “upright” direction of the object it’s affecting.

While Align All Axes is on, a stalk for the X axis of the object can be moved, and a Z axis indicator is shown.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# Speed

The target rotation speed to move towards the desired rotation.

# Align All Axes

When on, all axes will try to align themselves with the scene’s axes instead of just the Y axis.

# Strength

The gadget’s ability to overcome forces such as inertia, gravity, collisions, etc.

# Overall Damping

The gadget’s ability to reduce rotation to the desired speed.

# Outputs

# Affected Object(s)

Any objects connected to this output will be affected by the gyro.

# Hand/Imp Tracker

Contains the tabs:

A group that tracks with the player’s imp(s). Multiple trackers can follow the same imp.

Note that sculpts will react physically if they collide with other sculpts, and the contents of the group will twist and move accordingly—just as with a movable group containing a sculpt.

The colour of the tweak menu will reflect the Laser Colour setting.
While following a player, their imp will not show as part of a Controller Sensor.
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.007538461538461538% gameplay > things per object.

# Laser

When in VR, a laser is attached to the tracker that works like a Laser Scope. By default it will be the same colour as the imp being followed by the tracker.

# General

# Visible

(See Group Tweak Menu > Visible.)

# Movable When Not Following

(See Head Tracker > Movable When Not Following.)

# Hide Imp

When on, the imp will not be shown while this tracker is tracking it.

# Gizmo Type

The gizmo will now not adjust based on if the tracker will work for moves-only. Instead, the kind of gizmo required can be selected by the creator.

Wireless Controller:

A representation of the imp when not in VR.

Motion Controller:

A representation of the imp when not in VR; the stalk is taller, and the imp body is lower down.

Wireless Controller - VR:

A red representation of the dualshock 4 controller, and a blue representation of where the imp will appear in relation to it.

Motion Controller - VR:

A red representation of the move controller, and a blue representation of where the imp will appear in relation to it.

# Controller Assignment

Note: icons. test left/right moves

Which controller will be followed for a player.

Primary:

Targets a player’s primary controller, whether that is a Dualshock 4 or the primary move controller.

Secondary:

Targets a player’s secondary move controller, if they have one connected.

Left Hand:

Targets whichever move controller they are holding in their left hand. If their preferences are set to Left-handed mode, this will be the primary move controller. If not in Left-handed mode, this will be the secondary move controller.

Right Hand:

Targets whichever move controller they are holding in their right hand. If their preferences are set to Left-handed mode, this will be the secondary move controller. If not in Left-handed mode, this will be the primary move controller.

Wireless Controller:

Targets the player’s Dualshock 4 controller.

# Flip For Left-Handed

Note: Make a section about which hand is which for the moves.

When following the player’s move controller in their left hand (primary move when left-handed setting is enabled, secondary move if right-handed setting is enabled) the group (and all it contains) will be flipped horizontally (along the X axis of the gadget).

# Follow Player’s Imp

(See Head Tracker > Follow Player's Head.)

# Using Motion Controllers

Sends a signal while the player is using the moves.

# Imp Settings

# ‘Follow Imp’ Behaviour

(See Controller Sensor > ‘Follow Imp’ Behaviour.)

Allows “Follow Imp,” and “Gun Style” settings.

# Distance from Camera

How far from the camera the tracker will be moved to in the direction of the imp.

# Follow Grabbed Item

When on, the tracker will move to the point of a grabbable sculpt when grabbed by the imp, and back after the imp lets go.

# Consider Players

Note: test

When on, Grabbed, Hovering Grabbable, and Hovering Possessable outputs will send the player that owns the target object.

# Grabbed

Sends a signal while something is grabbed by the controller this tracker is following.

# Hovering Grabbable

Sends a signal while this tracker is hovering over something that is grabbable.

# Hovering Possessable

Sends a signal while this tracker is hovering over something that is possessable.

# Laser Settings

Note that the hand laser does nothing unless in VR mode.

# Override Laser Colour

When on, the laser will use the colour set by this tracker.

When off, the laser will use the colour of the imp it is tracking.

# Laser Colour

Available:

when Override Laser Colour is on.

The colour used for the laser.

Setting this will turn on Override Laser Colour.

# Override Laser Properties

Note: What is this overriding? update uisettings icon

Overrides the laser properties with the settings below.

# Laser Length

Available:

when Override Laser Properties is on.

The distance that the laser reaches as well as grabbing and possessing.

# Beam Power

Available:

when Override Laser Properties is on.

Adjust the visuals of the beam, making it appear more big and powerful and cool at the high end, and thinner at the low end.

# Show Beam

Available:

when Override Laser Properties is on.

When on, the beam is visible.

# Show Reticule

Available:

when Override Laser Properties is on.

When on, a circular animated graphic is shown where the laser hits an object.

# Consider Players, Hit?, Hit Position, Hit Surface Orientation

(See Gadget > Laser Scope.)

# Head/Camera Tracker

Contains the tabs:

A group that tracks with the player’s view. Multiple trackers can follow the same player’s view.

Note that sculpts will react physically if they collide with other sculpts, and the contents of the group will twist and move accordingly—just as with a movable group containing a sculpt.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.0061875% gameplay > things per object.

# Game View vs Headset View

The game view is defined as the current camera’s angle and position. Think of it as a window; you can move forward and back and side to side, but the window frame won’t move with you.

The headset view is defined as the current position and angle. Think of it as an American football helmet; you can move around and shake your head and the faceguard will move with you.

# Look Cursor

The look cursor is effectively a Laser Scope pointing from the centre of the view in the direction of the view is facing.

# General

# Visible

(See Group Tweak Menu > Visible.)

# Movable When Not Following

While not following the player’s view, the group will become movable.

# Follow Head in VR

When on, the tracker will follow the “headset view.”

When off, the tracker will follow the “game view.”

# Multiply Scale

Scales the contents of the group relative to the centre of the group.

Objects in the group are normal objects within the world, so when you get up-close to something they can collide with walls etc. Using this setting, you can make everything in the group very small and close to the camera and so will reduce the likelihood of the objects colliding.

# Follow Player’s Head

If no input is wired, the first player’s view will be followed.

When an input is wired will use that signal to follow or stop following the player’s view. When sent a positive signal, the tracker will follow. When sent a non-positive signal <= 0, the tracker will not follow.

If the input is a Player Info fat wire type, the tracker will follow the lowest-number player’s view that has a positive value in the corresponding position of the fat wire; otherwise the first player’s view will be followed.

If no player has a positive value in the fat wire, the tracker will not follow any player.

Will always output a Player Info signal. If a non-Player Info input is wired, the values of the output will all be the default.

# Look Cursor Settings

# Enable Look Cursor

When on, the look cursor and the rest of the settings in this tab will be enabled.

# Show Look Cursor

Displays a white dot at the centre of the view, indicating where the cursor is hitting.

When using VR, the depth of the cursor will match whatever it is hitting.

# Cursor Range, Falloff, Consider Players, Hit?, Hit Position, Hit Surface Orientation, Hit Distance

(See Gadget > Laser Scope.)

# Labels

# Outputs

# Head Position

The position, orientation, and scale of the current view.

# X Direction, Y Direction, Z Direction

(See Movement Sensor > X/Y/Z Direction.)

# Is In VR?

Sends a signal while the player is wearing the headset.

# Is VR Comfort Mode On?

Sends a signal while the player has “Comfort Mode” enabled.

# Health Manager

Contains the tabs:

Stores and manages the current health of an object.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# Max Health

The maximum health allowed.

# Current Health

The current health the linked object has. Note this cannot be set to a value higher than the maximum health setting.

# Cooldown Time

After taking damage how many seconds to wait before damage can be taken again.

# Damage Multiplier

Note: needs icon

All incoming health modifications—positive or negative—will be multiplied by this amount. If set at 0%, no modification can happen.

# Consider Players

When on, affects the Currently Gaining Health and Currently Losing Health outputs.

# Inputs & Outputs

# Affected Object(s)

Links to objects that will be used to receive health modifications. Objects connected by joints to the linked object will also receive modifications.

# Remaining Health (%) Percentage

The percentage of current health relative to the maximum health. Output = [current health] / [maximum health]

This can be used to drive a health bar or the colour of a health indicator. (Tg)

# Currently Gaining Health

Sends a signal with how much health has been gained on this logic frame.

If “consider players” is on, the corresponding player components of the output will carry the amount gained from modifiers inside of objects possessed by players.

For example, player 1 has a health manager set to “consider players.” A health modifier is in player 2’s puppet that adds 5. While player 1’s puppet is affected by player 2’s health modifier, this output’s fat wire would give 0 for players other than player 2. But the player 2 component would give 5 because player 2 has a modifier adding 5.

# Currently Losing Health

Similar to Currently Gaining Health but for when health is subtracted.

# No Health

Sends a signal while “Current Health” is at 0.

# Reset Health

When triggered, sets “Current Health” to the “Max Health” value.

# Health Modifier

Contains the tabs:

Modifies the health managers of objects.

To have an object affect its own health, a health modifier must still be used. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# Health Change

How much health is subtracted or added when a health manager is affected by this modifier. See Modifier Mode for details on how this value is used.

# Modifier Mode

When health will be modified while powered.

Hit

A health manager’s current health will be modified fully the instant it is affected.

Continuous

Health will be modified over time at a rate of [Health Change] per second.

# Modifier Type

What will trigger the modification to happen.

Hit

A health manager will be affected while its linked object is touching this health modifier’s linked object.

Zone

A health manager will be affected while its linked object is within this health modifier’s zone.

# Consider Players

Affects the output of Currently Modifying.

# Scope

(See Trigger Zone > Detection Scope.)

Note that to determine what modifiers are “Here,” the seeking gadget is the Health Manager, not the Health Modifier that has this setting.

# Zone Size

# Labels

# Inputs & Outputs

# Currently Modifying

When “consider players” is off, outputs a 1 for all players.

When “consider players” is on, outputs a 1 only for players whose health managers are being affected by this modifier.

# Affected Object(s)

Links to objects that will be used to trigger a modification. Objects connected by joints to the linked object will also trigger a modification.

# Impact Sensor

Contains the tabs:

The impact sensor outputs signals when a linked movable object collides with another object.

(Jj)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.0061333333333333335% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties & I/O (Inputs & Outputs)

# Sense Impacts

The object to sense impacts for. (Jj)

# Sensitivity

All impact force outputs are multiplied by this setting. (Jj) The actual force values are pretty huge.

Does not affect the Touching output.

# Touching

Outputs a collision signal while the object is touching another object. The strength of the output is 1 while touching (not affected by Sensitivity). (Jj) (Tg)

# Bumps

Outputs a collision signal when the object first collides with another object. The strength of the output is the force of the collision. (Jj)

# Rolls

Outputs a collision signal while the object is rolling on the surface of another object. The strength of the output is the speed the object is rolling. (Jj)

# Scrapes

Outputs a collision signal while the object is scraping (or sliding) across the surface of another object. The strength of the output is how much downward force is being applied toward the object being slid across. (Jj)

# Labels

# Keyframe

Note: power more than 2 less than halfway, do they still not interfere?
Contains the settings:

A keyframe holds state. This can be the state of almost any property—including multiple objects, positions, settings… but not edits such as a shape inside a sculpt. (Mm) (Pk) (Tg) Also captures the use of tools to adjust settings. (Mm) And changed to logic settings, making wireless communication very easy to set up. (Tg)

When hovering over an empty keyframe, [empty] will be shown in red beneath the keyframe’s name.

Note, some properties cannot be keyframed: names of objects, names to detect, text fields, editor mode buttons, and wire connections for inputs or outputs.
Also, no contents of an object can be directly affected, such as the edits of a sculpt, painting, or notes in an instrument.

When a keyframe is first placed within the world, it automatically goes into recording mode. (Mm)

Note that when a new keyframe is placed anywhere but a timeline, the keyframe starts powered off. When a keyframe is moved onto a timeline, it will become powered on.

As there is no visual indicator linking a keyframe directly to a recorded object or setting, it’s best practise to immediately name and/or colour the keyframe after placing it.

While a keyframe is selected, objects and settings affected by the keyframe will have hatch-marks across them. The state stored in the keyframe is also previewed. (Pk) (Tg) While actively editing a keyframe, it is also previewed.

When changing a setting while recording, the last state of that setting will be what is recorded. So if there’s a power button that is on, and you click it with Cross button twice while recording, it will be recorded as being on. (Tg)

Keyframes can be used to transmit data across the scene with no visible wires. (Tg)
They can also be used to create a stop-motion effect instead of tweening. (Tg) Or showing and hiding sculpts to give the impression their forms are changing over time. (Tg)

Hovering over an object that a keyframe has recorded something for will cause the keyframe to throb. (Tg)

Press Triangle button on things with hatch-marks to remove the recorded state for that object or setting. (Mm) (Tg)

When an object that has state recorded by a keyframe is copied, the keyframe will affect the copy also.

However, if the object and the keyframe was copied at the same time, the original keyframe will affect the original object, and the keyframe copy will affect the object copy.

If the position of a connected object is recorded using Inverse Kinematics first, any manipulation of that object will use IK. While recording using R2 , hold shift to allow disjointing the connector and move the child freely. (Tg)

If the position of a connected object is recorded using Forward Kinematics first, any manipulation of that object will use forward kinematics.

Amount powered affects:

Its state and springyness will be applied to the percentage of the power. (Pk) (Tg)

For example, a keyframe stores a move of an object as +10 on the X axis. If powered with a signal of 1 or more, the object’s position will become +10. If powered with a signal of 0.6, the object’s position will become +6.

In this way, by changing the value used to power a keyframe over time, you can animate values and positions etc. of any state recorded by it.

Half-powering a keyframe will also constantly blend between the keyframed state and the normal state it would be in if it weren’t keyframed. This is great for allowing a little bit of arm swing while the hand is still pointing in a particular direction. (Tg)

Powering more than one keyframe at a time will average the state between them when they affect the same setting, weighted depending on how powered a keyframe is. (Tg) Powering two keyframes to less than half-power will cause them to not interfere for stored positions. (Tg)

Many gadgets have a core and falloff, and use that to output a percentage instead of a simple ON and OFF. Such values can be wired directly into a keyframe’s power to have more effect the closer an object is, for example. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object. 0.005375% gameplay > wires & animation per setting affected.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

When on a timeline on the same row as another keyframe, with no other gadgets between them, becomes part of a keyframe set. When part of a keyframe set, you can blend between keyframes with more precision. Press shift +Cross button on the space between the keyframes to cycle through the previous keyframe’s different blending modes. (Mm) While recording into a keyframe in a keyframe set, you can move to the previous keyframe with shift +Left button, and to the next keyframe with shift +Right button.

When a keyframe within a keyframe set is highlighted, objects whose state is affected by those keyframes will show a path of their changes. The dashed line of the path indicates the blending between each keyframed position (longer dashes for faster movement, shorter dashes for slower movement). Each keyframed position is also marked with a glowing yellow translucent sphere.

While keyframes are on the same row of a timeline with no non-keyframe gadget between them, they form a keyframe set. Use shift +Cross button between two keyframes to cycle through blending types. These will set the keyframe on the left of the gap, setting how it interpolates between that state and the state of the next keyframe as the playhead goes through that part of the timeline.

Tying keyframes into a set in this way also allows a shortcut to move between them while recording, by using L1 + Left button/Right button.

This works even if there are other gadgets between the keyframes.

Also, if you select one or hover over one of the keyframes in a blended set, a preview of the path of objects with their position recorded will be shown in the scene.
Keyframes can be used without blending to create frame-by-frame animation. (Tg) Even to power-on and move a frame into the correct position, allowing you to easily edit the frames by themselves but allow the animations to all play in the same place. (Tg)

# Restoring Positions within Groups

When the transform (position/rotation/scale) of an object is recorded, but then changed in edit mode, the recording will be adjusted also. The keyframe will restore the position etc. relative to the object’s current scope—meaning, if it is inside a group the position will be restored relative to wherever that object is. (Tg)

If it is not inside a group, the position will be restored relative to the scene. (Tg)

# Types of Recording

Brown hatch-marks going from the bottom-left to top-right indicate the transform (position, rotation, and scale) of the object has been stored as an IK recording.

Green hatch-marks going from the bottom-right to the top-left indicate the transform has not been stored, but other things have been stored.

# IK and FK

In a system of jointed objects, a “root” object with no parent objects can only have its transform recorded.

A “child” object with one parent that is a root can only have its joint rotation recorded (FK).

A child with a parent that is not the root can be recorded with IK or FK.

If a keyframe has recorded IK or FK for an object, it will use that mode for any future adjustments.

For example, record a child with a non-root parent using L2 for an FK recording. Then record using R2 to adjust and only rotations will be allowed, adjusting the existing FK recording.

# Moving a Recorded Object

When an object that has its transform keyframed is moved, the recorded transform is adjusted to be relative to the new location. (Tg)

However, if the object is emitted in play mode at a different transform the keyframe will not adjust. (Tg)

# Only Affects Powered Objects

Keyframes only actively apply themselves to an object if that object is powered. When an object becomes powered on one frame, it may not be affected by a keyframe until the next frame. (Tg)

Tweak Menu

# Blend Type

Available:

when on a timeline.

Available only when part of a set of keyframes within a timeline. Dictates the interpolation between this keyframe and the next keyframed state within the set.

Note that if rotation is recorded, it will rotate the object using the shortest route. So if you want something to rotate 180 degrees or more in a particular direction, it may be safer to use several keyframes to make sure it rotated in the desired direction.
This setting doesn’t have any effect when there is no keyframe immediately to the right of this one on the same row.
None:

doesn’t interpolate at all. The current keyframe will simply remain active until the next keyframe is activated.

Linear:

will transition towards the next state at a steady speed. (eg. +3, +3, +3, +3, +3.)

Ease in:

will transition slowly at first, and become faster. (eg. +1, +2, +3, +4, +5.)

Ease out:

will transition quickly at first and become slower. (eg. +5, +4, +3, +2, +1.)

Ease in and out:

will transition slowly, then quickly, then slowly. This is useful for more natural movements. (eg. +1, +3, +5, +3, +1.)

# Easing Strength

Unavailable:

when the Blend Type is linear or none.

Dictates how intense the easing function will be applied. The “strength” of the blend. For example, if using “ease in,” a higher strength will begin the transition slower.

This can be used to give weighting to random values. (Tg)

# Springiness

When the keyframe is trying to set an object’s transform (position, rotation, scale), a higher springiness will allow the state to be overshot—wobbling back and forth like a physical spring—until eventually coming to a stop at the correct state. (Tg) (Tg)

Note that even after becoming unpoweres, a keyframe with springyness will still affect an object’s transform until all the object settles down into its final state. (Tg)

This works on gadgets within the world, but not on any other settings including gizmos. (Tg)

# Smoothing

When part of a keyframe set and smoothing is on, will use the incoming and outgoing trajectory of a transition to plot a smoother transition through the stored state.

Note that this does not affect timing, or recorded rotation or scale, but position only. For this reason, a linear blend works best.

For example, you have three keyframes positioning an object at points of a triangle, with some sort of blending between them. If smoothing is off, the object will move to the next keyframed position, then move to the one after that. You’ll see the “corner” of the keyframe and an abrupt change in direction. If smoothing is on, the transitions will take into account where the object is coming from and where it is moving to, and attempt to smooth out the corner. So the path of the object will still hit those positions at the corners of a triangle, but those corners will be smoothed out and less noticeable.

# Keep Changes

When off, after the keyframe is powered off the states affected by it will revert to what they were before.

When on, the state will be preserved instead. (Tg)

Note that currently when a keyframe is half-powered each frame it will apply this operation. The result is that the animation will appear exponentially sped up. (Tg)
By using a half-powered second keyframe to balance it out you can keep the “keep changes” of the final state, without the animation being sped up. (Tg)

# Slow Power Up, Slow Power Down

These sliders set how long it takes to reach the desired power level, using an ease-out function. (Tg)

When the target power increases, it takes Slow Power Up seconds to reach it. When the target power decreases, it takes Slow Power Down seconds to reach it. (Mm) (Tg)

When keyframing the power of an object, that power is also animated by this setting. For gadgets that are not affected by the amount of power received, this allows a single keyframe to keep that object powered while the keyframe is being powered or is still animating using these settings.

For example, fading a text displayer in and out. (Tg)

# Animation Colour

The colour of the gadget. (Tg)

# Laser Scope

Contains the tabs:

Plots a line in a particular direction, and finds out if it collides with a sculpt’s surface. (Known as “raycasting.”)

The face of the gadget shows a black bar that reaches higher, the stronger the detected hit is.

Gizmo:

Has an origin location it casts the ray from. (Tg) A stalk comes out of the origin which can be dragged with R2 to set the angle of the line which is used when not aiming at tags. (Tg) An arrow is shown on the stalk which sets the Range setting. (Tg) A disc is shown at the end of the stalk which sets the Falloff setting. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006266666666666667% gameplay > things per object. 1023 laser scopes can function at once.

# Important Properties

# Range

The length of the ray that is cast. (Jj)

# Falloff

The fall off is the distance beyond the length of the ray that will produce a lower signal depending on how close the hit is from the end of the falloff and towards the core length. (Jj) (Similar to Trigger Zones.)

# Point at Tags

When on, will detect tags with the specified name. (Jj)

# Look for Tag Name

Available:

while Point At Tags is on.

The name for the tag to look for. (Jj)

Use the adjustment controls to cycle through the names of all tags in the scene, and all tag names that are looked for by other gadgets.

# Scope

(See Trigger Zone > Detection Scope.)

# Hit Something

Sends “on” (1) when the laser scope hits an object as defined by the settings. (Jj)

# Local Space

When on, the angle of the laser scope changes with the rotation of the gadget itself. When off, the angle of the laser scope doesn’t change, but the location will follow the group. (Jj)

# Consider Players

While on, outputs will consider players. The Player Info outputs will send a value through the corresponding player’s component when hitting an object that is owned by that player.

# Labels

Sets the required labels, visibility, and collisability of the sculpt to register a hit. (Tg)

Using this, some sculpts can be excluded from being detected as a hit. (Tg)

# Hit Detail Outputs

# Hit Position

When detected, sends the hit position within the scene.

# Hit Angle

When detected, sends the 3D “normal” angle of the surface hit by the laser scope.

# Hit Distance

When detected, sends the distance from the laser scope source to the point hit.

# Light

Contains the settings:

Emanates light. This affects objects within the scene. Also lights up fog. There is a very mild fog across every scene by default. So if the light has sufficient brightness, you’ll see a slight fog around the light itself.

Spotlights can cast shadows when hitting sculpts that have “cast shadows” enabled.

The received power multiplies the Brightness of the light.

Gizmo:

Has a location marker for the source fo the light, and other parts depending on which mode the light is in. See Type for details.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Each spotlight whose cone touches a sculpt or painting must be calculated while rendering that sculpt or painting. The number of spotlights, spotlight-lit objects, and how many flecks must be rendered of those objects all increase rendering time.

There is a limit of 64 spotlights that can be rendered at the same time; any more and those furthest from the player’s view will not be rendered.

There is a limit of 16 spotlights that can cast shadows at the same time; any more and those furthest from the player’s view will have shadows turned off.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

Tweak Menu

# Type

What kind of light is emitted by the gadget.

Spot

A spot light, targeted in one direction.

The gizmo displays as a cone. Drag the sides of the cone with R2 to adjust its Beam Angle. Hold shift while dragging to adjust its Fade Angle.

Drag the end circle with R2 to adjust the Beam Range.

Drag the dot in the centre of the circle with R2 to adjust the angle and range of the beam at the same time.

# Diffuse

A point of light that casts light all around it. Note that diffuse lights cannot cast shadows; only spotlights.

The gimzo becomes a simple sphere. Drag its sides wit R2 to affect the Brightness.

# Brightness

The brightness of the light when it affects the scene.

When in diffuse mode, also affects the light’s range of affect.

# Colour

Dictates the colour of the light emitted by the gadget. A darker colour will appear as though less light is being emitted.

# Hue Cycle

Cycles the hue of the selected colour.

# Beam Range

Unavailable:

when in diffuse mode.

The range of the spotlight.

# Beam Angle

Unavailable:

when in diffuse mode.

The angle of the spotlight beam.

# Fade Angle

Unavailable:

when in diffuse mode.

The percentage of the full beam angle that fades out. If set to 0, the edge of the beam will be crisp. If set to 100%, the strength of the light will be strongest in the centre of the beam and fall off towards the edges.

# Cast Shadows

Unavailable:

when in diffuse mode.

When on, sculptures that cast shadows will block the light when hit by it. (Tg)

# Use Image

Unavailable:

when in diffuse mode.

A slider with 15 different associated images that will be used as masks over the light source as if blocking it. This is a very easy way to add some atmosphere to a scene and give the light some texture.

When set to 0, no image will be used and the light will be emitted as normal.

To make a custom mask, turn on “cast shadows” for both the light and a sculpt can be made to block some of the light. (Tg) To cast softer shadows a Fog gadget can be used.

# Image Blur

Unavailable:

when in diffuse mode.

When using an image, dictates the percentage the image will be blurred before blocking the light. Setting to 0% leaves the image crisp, setting to 100% will blur the image a lot.

# Look At Rotator

Contains the tabs:

Rotates an object around its centre of mass to “face” a target position or direction.

Note, by using a connector the joint will set the pivot point around which the rotator will rotate the object.
Gizmo:

Has a location marker with an arrow showing the direction each object is “looking at.” The object will be rotated so that the arrow points at the target. (Jj) (Tg)

Note, the gizmo’s base location is tied to the centre of mass of the linked object. And the arrow will use the same direction relative to the orientation of each linked object.
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# Rotation Speed

Sets the rotation speed in degrees per second. (Jj)

# Stay Upright

When on, only rotates around the Y axis and around the “forward” axis as indicated by the gizmo. Effectively, it prevents the gadget from “rolling” the affected object. (Jj) (Tg)

# Rotation Strength

How much force is used to bring the rotation of the object to the specified rotation speed. (Jj)

# Overall Damping

How quickly the object’s rotation will slow down to face the target. (Jj)

# Look for Tag

The name of the tag to “look at.” (Jj) If there are multiple within range, uses the closest tag.

# Scope

(See Trigger Zone > Detection Scope.)

# Strength & Distance

# Minimum Distance

The location marker must be at least this far away from the tag for the gadget to start “looking at” it. (Similar to a Follower’s Range.)

# Maximum Distance

The location marker must be within this range of the tag for the gadget to start “looking at” it. (Similar to a Follower’s Range.)

# X, Y, Z Rotation Strength

The percentage of the strength used in each axis.

# Inputs & Outputs

# Affected Objects(s)

The objects that will be affected by this gadget.

# Target Position

(Similar to the Follower’s Target Position Input.)

When no wire is plugged in, uses the tag settings.

When a wire is plugged in, uses the received signal as the target position. This overrides a signal received by the Scene Space Direction input.

# Found Target

Sends a signal while a target position is being used.

Note if only a direction is being used, this does not send a signal.

# Scene Space Direction

A direction to look in, relative to the object itself. All linked objects will look in the same direction when using this. (Tg)

While there is no tag found, this will output the direction of the “forward” arrow itself. So this can be used to create an easily customisable direction. (Tg)

# Look Cursor Sensor

Contains the settings:

Senses when an object is in the centre of a player’s view. The Head/Camera Tracker’s the “Enable Look Cursor” setting must be enabled. (Works with and without VR.)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Hovered by Cursor

Sends a signal of 1 for all players looking at any of the linked object(s).

# Sense Look

Links to objects to sense.

# Show Hover Visual

When on, the object that is being looked at will glow. (Not all linked objects; just the one being looked at.)

# Microchip

Contains the tabs:

Stores any gadgets, to keep them neat and compartmentalised. It’s a good idea to begin any feature you want to create with placing a microchip, naming it, giving it an icon, and a colour. (Mm)

Note that if you surface-snap a microchip to an object, that object will be used as the “affected object” for gadgets within the microchip, such as the destroyer gadget or rotator gadget. (Ao)

Scoping in to a microchip opens a window that contains everything inside the microchip. Here you can move things around, drag them in or out, clone them, etc. using the normal controls.

To expand the window, hover over an edge (or corner). A white halo effect will appear at that edge. Hold Cross button over the edge of a window and drag to adjust its size.

Amount powered affects:

It’s worth noting that different power amounts does not affect any contained gadgets. They will behave as if powered fully or not at all. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Wire Routing Nodes

Wires will curve nicely from the source to the destination. However, if you have a lot of wires, this can get confusing to look at. Hover over a wire and press Cross button to add a node. When a wire has at least one node on it, they will become straight instead of curved. These nodes dictate “corners” the wire will head towards. Add multiple notes to make a path the wire will follow. (Mm)

Hold Cross button on a node to drag it around. If the node is dragged over another node, the nodes will stick together and you’ll now be dragging both as one. If more than one wire has a node in the exact same spot, they will path around that node in a “ribbon” effect, lining up next to each other.

Press Triangle button on a node to remove it.

# General

# Microchip Colour

The colour of the microchip. Note that this will also colour the background of the microchip’s window. It can be useful to adjust this to make it easier to see certain wires.

# Custom Icon

The icon of the microchip. When the icon is not the default Microchip, a smaller microchip icon will also be shown in the bottom-right corner.

The options are as follows: Wireless controller, Biped, Imp, Skull, Rocket, Rock, Lightning flash, Flag, Camera, Sound effect, Music, Move, Settings, Filmstrip, Clock, Light on, Trash can, Script, Environment, Cloud, Score counter, and Wind.

# Affected Object

Gadgets within the microchip will also affect and sense using the microchip’s attached objects.

# Audio

# Movement Sensor

Contains the tabs:

Senses the movement of the attached objects.

Gizmo:

An unmovable location marker located at the centre of mass of the attached objects.

When “Local Space” is on, shows rotatable axes.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006266666666666667% gameplay > things per object.

# Important Properties & I/O (Input and Output)

# Sense Movement

The objects to sense movement of.

# Velocity (Overall)

The positive velocity (in meters) of the fastest-moving linked object.

Unsigned, meaning it’s always a positive number.

# Velocity (X Axis), Velocity (Y Axis), Velocity (Z Axis)

The velocity in the corresponding axis. Where there are multiple linked objects, this is OR’d and the value furthest from 0 is used.

Signed, meaning it will be positive when moving in one direction and negative when moving in the opposite direction.

# Local Space

When on, will use its own axis orientation rather than the scenes’s orientation. Also allows the gizmo’s orientation to be adjusted.

# Relative to Object

As long as the attached object is moving, speeds will be judged relative to the linked object.

# X Direction, Y Direction, Z Direction

Directions relative to the centre of mass of the object describing the orientation of the object. (Tg) (Tg)

When multiple objects are linked, these directions are blended.

This outputs even if the linked object is unpowered.

# Acceleration Outputs

# Acceleration (Overall)

Sends the overall acceleration of the attached object(s).

Unsigned, meaning it’s always a positive number.

# Acceleration (X Axis), Acceleration (Y Axis), Acceleration (Z Axis)

Sends the acceleration in the corresponding axis.

Signed, meaning it will be positive when accelerating in one direction and negative when accelerating in the opposite direction.

# Mover

Contains the tabs:

Moves an object in a direction.

This marker has an arrow attached to it. You can drag this arrow to point in the direction the mover will move the object. (Jj)

This can be used to create completely controllable custom gravity. (Tg) Or the buoyancy of an object while in water. (Tg)

Gizmo:

Has a marker showing the X, Y, and Z axes. (Jj)

When in “local space” mode, these will reflect the current orientation of the gadget. Otherwise, they will be locked to the world grid. By default this will point “right” relative to the the face of the gadget.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# Forward Speed

The speed the object will move at.

# Movement Strength

How much effort the mover will put into getting the object up to the desired speed. A high strength means things like mass, friction, and collision with other objects will have less impact on the velocity of the object while being moved in the specified direction. (Jj)

# Overall Damping

How much effort the mover will put into slowing the object down to the desired speed. A low damping means the gadget will never slow the object down. Whereas 100% damping means the object will never go faster than the specified speed. (Jj)

# Local Space

When on, the direction the object will move will be affected by the orientation of the mover gadget.

# Damping Specifics

# Damp in X, Y, Z

Affects the damping in specific axes. The overall damping strength is multiplied by these settings when applied in those axes.

# Mover Direction Damping

Affects the damping in the mover’s direction.

# Miscellaneous I/O (Inputs & Outputs)

# Affected Object(s)

This is a link to one or more objects. If the gadget is stamped while snapping the surface of an object, that object will automatically hook up to this setting. (Jj)

The affected objects will be moved by the gadget.

# Direction of Movement

When a wire is connected and Local Space is off, the input will set the direction of the mover. (Tg)

Note, when wiring a direction into this setting, be sure to set it to the Overwrite blend mode so that it sets the value rather than modulating the existing direction. (Tg)
Also, if Local Space is on then the direction will be relative to the object itself. So most likely, if you are setting this with a scene-space direction you’ll want to turn off Local Space. (Tg)

Output will send the mover’s direction.

# Node

Contains the settings:

Passes signals through from its input to its output. (Jj) Can be used as ports in a microchip that show on the microchip gadget itself, making it easy to hook wires up without understanding the inner workings of the microchip.

Useful for allowing or blocking signals from one gadget to another, by powering and unpowering the node. (Tg)

The face of the gadget will display a black bar that reached from the bottom of the gadget to the top, depending on the input value. At 0, the bar will be all the way at the bottom. At 1, all the way to the top. At 0.5, the bar will reach halfway up.

If the input value is negative, the colour will be hue shifted by 180 degrees (eg. a yellow node will become blue).

If a Colour wire is input, that colour will be used as the colour, and the face of the gadget will not show a bar. If a thin wire is also input that is -1 or below, the node will be black.

Amount powered affects:

The value will be multiplied by the amount of power received.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Node Colour

The colour of the node gadget. Wires coming from a node’s output also use this colour. (Jj)

# Custom Icon

(See Microchip > Custom Icon.)

Sets the icon for the gadget. If the gadget is used as a port, dictates the icon used for the tab shown on the gadget. The face of the gadget shows the selected icon as well as a small display of the node’s port icon in the bottom-right corner.

The default setting is to use the port icon along.

# Create Port

Dictates whether the node will be displayed as a port and whether that port will accept inputs or outputs. (Jj)

When in a microchip, input and output ports appear as nubs on the left and right of the microchip respectively, allowing wires to be plugged into those ports even while the microchip is closed. When not in a microchip but inside a group, these ports can be seen from outside of the group allowing wires to be plugged into them without scoping into the group.

No-port

(sometimes referred to as a passthrough node) simply takes a signal and sends it out.

Input Port

takes a signal from outside the microchip. This node is shown on the left side of the gadget.

Output Port

sends a signal to outside the microchip. This node is shown on the right side of the gadget.

# Input/Output

This is an input and output. Shown on the gadget by default.

# Is Input Wired?

Sends 1 (“on”) while there is at least one wire connected to the node’s input. (Jj)

# NOT Gate

Contains the settings:

Outputs “on” if the input is “off,” and outputs “off” if the input is “on.” (Jj) See Output below for a fuller explanation.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Input

The input to invert, and the resulting inverted value.

Normally used to send 1 when the input receives a 0, and send a 0 when the input receives a 1.

When receiving a value from 0 to 1, sends the value subtracted from 1. When receiving a value less than 0 down to -1, sends the value subtracted from -1. You can even use this to create certain animated effects. (Tg)

If the input is outside this range, a 0 will be sent.

# Number Displayer

Contains the tabs:

Displays a number. Similar to the text gadget.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.0155% gameplay > things per object.

# Text Properties

# Number/Range

The value to display.

# Display Format

How the value will be formatted for display.

Number

displays the value as a normal number.

Time

Displays the value as a time, the value representing seconds. Only shows the parts needed. For example, if there are no whole minutes to display, only the number of seconds will be displayed.

# Decimal Places

Unavailable:

when in “time” mode.

The number of decimal places to display.

# Show Milliseconds

Unavailable:

when in “number” mode.

When on, will display milliseconds as a decimal.

# Text Colour, Text Brightness, Text Opacity, Font

(See Text Displayer > Text Properties.)

# Text Box Properties

# Border Properties

# Alignment

# Settings

# Inputs & Outputs

# Number Active

Outputs a signal while the gadget is powered. (Similar to the Dialogue’s I/O output.)

# OR Gate

Contains the settings:

Most commonly used to send an “on” signal when at least one of the inputs are “on.” (Jj)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Number of Ports

The number of used ports.

# Inputs

Multiple inputs used to find the highest value.

# Result

Sends the received signal with the highest magnitude (is furthest from zero). If there is a tie, the value received through a lower input (further down the gadget) is chosen.

When a fat wire value is received, a fat wire is sent and all values are OR’d with the same position value (X with X, Y with Y) in the other input signals.

Note that a Transform contains 8 components.

A fat-wire input with a lower number of components that the other inputs (eg. 2-number when there are other 3-number inputs) will be OR’d with the same position components in the other fat wires (X with X, Y with Y, and Z will not be OR’d).

A thin wire input will always be OR’d with all components of fat wires.

# Possession Recorder

Records the outputs of a controller while possessing an object. If the object is a puppet, also records the position and orientation of that object over time.

When in recording mode, all electronics etc. are hidden. A “count in” toggle dictates whether there will be a “3, 2, 1” countdown after possessing an object before time will run and it will begin recording.

If there is something recorded already, a red Stop Recording” button will appear. Also a “Retake” button can be used to delete the recording and start fresh.

All settings, how power affects playback, and timeline controls are the same as the action recorder.

“Keep Changes” is off by default.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Scope-in to:

to enter recording mode.

# Prize Bubble

Contains the settings:

Shows a metallic bubble. When the player collides with it, it “pops.” A bubble can contain a creation from the Dreamiverse.

An item picked up in this way will be available to the player in the “Prizes” tab (even if the object is private) when searching for an element to import into a creation. (Tg)

Note the homespace Prizes tab only allows access to prizes given my Media Molecule.
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.0061875% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Item

After the prize bubble is collected this Element will be unlocked for the player to use in their own creations, even if that element is private.

Prizes that have been collected can be selected.

# Visible

When on, the bubble will be visible in the scene.

# Use Built-in Collection Sound

When on, the built-in popping sound will play when the bubble is collected.

# Collectable by Imp

When on, can be collected by grabbing it with the imp.

# Collectable by Possessed

When on, can be collected by colliding a possessed object into it.

# Force Collect

When triggered, the prize bubble is collected.

# Just Collected

Sends a pulse when the bubble is collected.

# Puppet

Contains the tabs:

Puppets are the basis for most characters in Dreams. They give you procedural walking, and basic actions like jumping. There are two kinds of puppet you can get from the gadgets menu: the basic puppet which is a tan colour (like wood), and the deluxe puppet which is a blue colour. Note that the deluxe puppet is the basic puppet, with extra logic added that you could build yourself. (Mm)

Procedural animations such as walking, and running—and jumping up, at the peak of a jump, or falling down for more complex puppets such as the deluxe puppet—are based entirely on how the puppet is moving. This works regardless of how the puppet is being moved. For example, if the puppet is being moved by using the left stick or by a Mover or some animation, they will all trigger the walking animations.

The puppet is a special kind of group, sometimes referred to by Mm as a “puppet heart.” Tweaking this group, or the purple base that appears when scoped into the puppet, will give you the special puppet tweak menu.

If you scope in to the puppet, you will see that each part of the puppet (head, limbs, etc.) is a separate sculpt. Those sculpts are joined by normal connectors. The mirrored body parts (eg. left hand and right hand) are live clones of each other. (Tg)

You can also use the stretch tool (without editing the sculpt itself) to adjust the proportions of the puppet. (Mm)

You can scope into these to edit those sculpts as normal, or to add objects into a group with that sculpt. (Mm)

Note that puppets will automatically die when they have fallen a set amount of in-scene distance. This is set in the Global Settings gadget.

If the run speed is set to equal or less than the walk speed, running is completely switched off.

If the run is enabled, the puppet transitions between the base settings to running-keyframed settings based on the magnitude of the puppet interface’s walk input between 0.95 and 1.

You can turn a regular puppet into a first-person puppet. By making the head invisible, adjusting its controller sensor’s camera distance, and turning on the “face camera” setting.

By default, puppets come with a “lean” functionality that allows the player to expressively look around with their character and bend their body by tilting the controller. Though this can be adjusted however you like.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.09367539920159682% gameplay > things per object. 1 of 256 gameplay > unique stamped elements per kind of puppet.

# Basic Puppet

Contains:

A running pose.
Press Circle button to de-possess.
A Health Manager.
Death when falling out of the scene or losing all health, and respawn on death.
Left stick to walk/run, Cross button to jump, and Motion sensor movementMotion Sensor to puppet lean.
Audio-surface sensitive sound effects for jumping, landing, and footsteps.

# Deluxe Puppet

Contains the same features as the basic puppet, plus:

Jump poses for ascent, peak, and descent.
An idle pose.
Level complete victory pose.
While possessed, “Follow me,” “Look at me,” and “Possessed puppet” tags are powered.
While not possessed and time is running, auto jump is turned off and follow is turned on.

# Walk Speed, Run Speed, and Procedural Animation

These settings control the speed of the puppet based on the magnitude of the “walk” input on a corresponding puppet interface (I will refer to this as the “magnitude”). By default, that input is connected to the left stick on the controller that is possessing the puppet.

So if you push the left stick all the way to the outer edge on the controller, the magnitude is 1. If you let it stay in the centre, it is 0.

While moving, the maximum speed of the puppet is whichever is greater out of the walk and run speeds. This speed is modulated by the magnitude.

For example, at 0.97 magnitude it moves at 0.97 of its run speed. And at 0.5 magnitude it moves at half of the run speed. If the run speed is 10 m/s and the magnitude is at 0.5, the puppet will move at half of 10 m/s, which is 5 m/s.

While moving slower or equal to the set walk speed, the walk settings will be in effect. From above walk speed to the run speed, the settings will transition to the run settings. If the run speed is equal to or less than walk speed, the running settings will not come into effect.

For example, say the walk speed is 5 m/s, and the run speed is 15 m/s. The setting for “arm flail” is set to 0 for walking, and 100% for running. While the speed of the puppet is 10 m/s—halfway between its walk and run speeds—the arm flail will be at 50%—halfway between the walking arm flail and the running arm flail.
Note that in reality, this is most likely based on the magnitude value, and uses the ratio between walk and run speeds to figure out the transition. The explanation is still accurate, as the puppet speed and walk magnitude values are strongly linked.

The puppet interface’s walk/running strength outputs are also strongly linked to how this works internally.

# Quick Edit

At the bottom of the Overall Movement, Upper Body Movement, and Lower Body Movement tabs a “Quick Edit” selector is shown with the following options:

Idle

activates when not walking or running.

Walk

activates when at walking speed.

Run

activates when moving faster than walking speed.

Jump Ascent

activates when moving up and not touching the ground.

Jump Peak

activates when not moving up or down and not touching the ground.

Jump Descent

activates when moving down and not touching the ground.

Clicking on one edits the oldest keyframe wired to that output from the Puppet Interface.

Or while playing time, clicking on a Quick Edit pose will preview that pose as it would be procedurally animated.

# Flipping Issues

When a puppet has been flipped, it can then respawn at an odd angle before righting itself. To fix this, unflip the puppet. (Tg)

# Overall Movement

# Walk Speed

The speed the puppet will move while walking at full strength.

# Run Speed

The speed the puppet will move while running at full strength. (Tg)

# Turn Speed

In degrees per second. How fast the puppet turns whenever it needs to turn.

# 2D Movement

When on, normal puppet controls can only move the character left and right on the scene’s X axis.

Works very similarly to a setup using a follower, which can be used for any object. (Tg)

# Face Camera While Idle

Available:

when 2D Movement is on.

When on, the puppet will turn towards the camera while possessed and idle.

# Face Camera Direction

When on, the puppet will turn away from the camera while possessed.

# Acceleration

In meters per second per second. How quickly the puppet increases its speed.

# Deceleration

In meters per second per second. How quickly the puppet reduces its speed.

# Jump Height

The height of a full jump.

A jump is triggered by a signal being sent into the “Jump” input of a puppet interface inside the puppet’s group.

Note that if gravity is set to 0%, the puppet will be unable to jump.

The jump and double-jump could be made completely custom by implementing it using a mover, and the animations will work just as normal. (Tg)

# Min Jump Height

The minimum height relative to the Jump Height setting. As the jump signal continues, the puppet will keep getting higher to a maximum of Jump Height.

For example, Cross button is wired to tell the puppet to jump using a puppet interface. If the player taps Cross button for as short a time as they can, the puppet will reach the “minimum jump height.” If the player holds Cross button until the puppet reaches the top of their jump, the puppet will reach “jump height.”

# Double Jump Height

How high the puppet will jump when told to jump while it is in the air. The puppet can only use this feature once while in the air until it stands on the ground again.

If set to 0 or Jump Height is set to 0, double-jump will not activate.

Note that if gravity is set to 0%, the puppet will be unable to double-jump.

# Gravity

How much effect the global gravity of the scene will have on the puppet.

# Air Control

How much the puppet’s direction can be controlled while in the air. For example, if set to 0%, while the puppet is in the air any input by the player will not affect the puppet’s trajectory.

# Walkable Slope

In degrees.

The puppet will slide off of any slopes that are steeper than this value.

# Sliding Friction

When the puppet is sliding down a slope it cannot walk up, dictates how fast the puppet will slide down it, or how “slippery” the slope appears to be.

# Camera Follow When Sliding

Note: Seems to follow when sliding either way; just doesn’t kill you if you slide down too far.

When on, the camera will follow the puppet as it slides down an incline. It will also not be considered to have fallen out of the scene, while sliding.

When off, the camera will not follow the puppet vertically when sliding.

# Lower Body Movement

# Slideyness

While accelerating, the legs’ procedural animation will act as though it is moving at some percentage of full speed. So if it takes a while to get going and the puppet has high slideyness, it will appear as though it is running on the spot.

# Skateyness

Reduces the effect of the legs’ procedural animation.

# Match Floor Angle

While supported by a sculpt, how much will the puppet’s pelvis tilt (and therefore the rest of the puppet in most circumstances) to match the angle of the sculpt’s surface. High means the puppet will appear perfectly perpendicular to the surface. Low means the puppet will attempt to stay upright.

# Lean Into Strength

How much the puppet will lean into a turn. Low means it will stay upright. High means it will lean hard into any turns.

# Feet Separation

How far apart the feet will be when walking or running. Low means the puppet will walk one foot directly in front of the other.

# Bicycle Feet

How much the feet move in a circular motion while walking, as if pedaling a bicycle.

# Stompyness

How high the knees get during the animation.

# T-Rex Tread

When on, at the back of the stride the leg will immediately pull forward, with the front of the stride rounding out. This means when a foot moves to the ground it is moving more vertically.

When off, at the front of the stride the leg will round out before moving forward and then comes closer to the ground. This means when a foot moves to the ground it is already close to the ground.

# Strideyness

How large each stride is. Low strideyness means the puppet will take tiny steps.

# Min. Stride Time

The minimum time each stride takes. Ensures the steps don’t get too short and quick for a larger, heavier, slower character.

Also useful to ensure the puppet doesn’t step too quickly while strafing left or right.

# Centre of Gravity

Moves the pelvis’s at-rest position up or down.

# Bounciness

How much the pelvis is moved up when a foot hits the ground. Negative will move the pelvis down when the foot hits the ground.

# Upper Body

# Motion Sensor Movement

How much the lean input of the puppet interface affects the lean of the puppet.

# Lean Lag

Note: check.

How delayed the lean of the character is when moving. For example, with higher lag, from a standing start the character will take longer to lean into the direction they are accelerating in.

Note, this lean is different to the one normally controlled by the motion sensor.

# Sassyness

How much the shoulders and hips rotate in opposite directions to each other.

# Sway

How much the puppet leans side to side from the hips as steps are taken.

Better with higher foot separation or a wider pose for the feet.

# Lumberingness

How much the shoulders lean side to side as steps are taken.

# Stiffness

How much the spine (specifically, joint between the belly and chest) ignores the breathyness setting.

# Arm Vigour

How much the arms rotate forward from the hands while walking.

# Arm Flail

How much the arms rotate at the shoulders while walking.

# Springiness

How floppy the joints are. Similar to joint springiness but does not affect the joint settings themselves.

# Breathyness

How much the puppet is affected by the breathing rhythm of approximately 3.8 seconds (from starting to breathe in, to breathing out completely and starting a new cycle).

# Body Structure

Many Object Link buttons with the Bone icon. Associate each with the corresponding body part to have procedural animations act on that body part.

If a part is not associated, it will appear faded.

If a part is associated or it cannot lead back through other properly linked parts to the pelvis it will not be affected by the procedural animations and the button will appear greyed out.

At least one heel must be correctly set up for the arms to procedurally animate.

# Behaviour

# Auto Jump

When on and moving across the ground towards a hole that the puppet can jump over at its current speed and jump height setting, it will jump.

# Auto Look

When Procedural Animation is on, allows the Look At settings to work.

If there is no tag target found for the Look At setting, the head will look towards the imp while the imp is close enough and in front of the head.

# Follow

When on, the puppet will move towards the closest powered tag with the correct name within range until it is within the minimum distance. (Tg)

The tag is not considered “detected” while being targeted by this setting.

To make a puppet flee from a tag instead of follow it, Follower and Rocket Rotator gadgets and can be used instead. (Tg)

# Inner Radius (follow)

The minimum distance from the target tag to reach.

# Outer Radius (follow)

The maximum distance a tag can be to be targeted.

# Turn Towards

When on, the puppet will turn to face the closest powered tag with the correct name within range. The “front” of the puppet is denoted by the point of the purple base within the puppet group.

Overrides the received Turn to Face direction.

# Outer Radius (turn towards)

The maximum distance a tag can be from the puppet to be targeted.

# Look At

When on and Auto Look is on, the puppet’s head will turn to look at the closest powered tag with the correct name within range.

# Outer Radius (look at)

The maximum distance a tag can be from the puppet to be targeted.

# Procedural Animation

When on, Auto Look, Procedural Walk, and Procedural Jump can work.

# Procedural Walk

When on and Procedural Animation is on, walking and running will be animated automatically, and Procedural Jump can work.

# Procedural Jump

When on and Procedural Walk and Animation are on, jumping will be animated automatically.

# Physical Properties

A puppet has a special “pill” shape for the collision of a puppet used not for colliding with the ground but with other objects. To preview this shape, hover over any of the collision shape settings.

# Visible, Movable, Collidable

(See Sculpt Tweak Menu > Physical.)

# Collision Shape: Vertical Position

How far up from the ground (purple base) the pill shape begins.

# Collision Shape: Height

How tall the pill shape is from end to end. As the width is a radius measured from the centre, the pill has a minimum height relative to the set width.

# Collision Shape: Width

The radius of the collision pill shape.

# Density

(See Sculpt Tweak Menu > Density.)

# Collision Labels

# Labels

# Audio

# Puppet Interface

Contains the tabs:

Sends commands and receives data from the puppet group the gadget is inside.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.008454545454545454% gameplay > things per object.

# Inputs

# Walk

Tells the puppet to move in a direction on the X-Z plane (not up and down), as well as how fast.

The speed the puppet will actually move is dictated by its walk and run settings. (Tg)

# Turn to Face

Tells the puppet to face a particular direction (not a position to look towards). (Tg) Good for quickly making twin-stick controls. (Tg)

# Lean

Tells the puppet to rotate its head to a certain angle.

# Go Forwards

Tells the puppet to move in the direction it is facing. The speed the puppet will actually move is dictated by its walk and run settings.

# Go Backwards

Tells the puppet to move away from the direction it is facing without turning away. The speed the puppet will actually move is dictated by its walk and run settings.

# Jump

Tells the puppet to jump.

If the puppet is currently in the air, has a non-zero double-jump height, and has not double-jumped since leaving the ground, the puppet will perform a double-jump.

# Outputs Page 1

# Jumped

Sends a pulse when the puppet jumps from on the ground because of an input into a puppet interface’s “jump”. The fat wire represents a collision with the surface the puppet left when jumping.

# Double Jumped

Sends a pulse when the puppet jumps again after jumping from the ground, if the settings allow a double-jump.

# Landing Impact

Sends a pulse when the puppet’s feet land onto a collidable surface.

Using this, fall damage can easily be implemented. (Tg)

# Predicted Landing Impact

The force the puppet is predicted to land with. Useful for triggering effects if the landing could be harmful.

# Fell Out of Scene

Sends a signal if the puppet has nothing below it within the scene’s maximum fall height that it can collide with.

# Distance from Ground

Sends the distance of the nearest object the puppet can collide with below the puppet.

# Idle Strength

The puppet is considered “idle” while not running, walking, or in the air.

Transitions to 1 while idle over roughly half a second. Transitions to 0 while not idle.

# Walking Strength

Sends the percentage of the puppet’s walking speed the puppet is moving at, minus the running strength.

This means as you go faster you’ll approach 1 as the speed nears the walking speed. But if the puppet has a running speed greater than the walking speed, it will go back down to zero as it approaches the running speed.

Only sends a signal while “procedural walk” is active.

# Running Strength

Sends the percentage of the puppet’s running speed the puppet is moving at.

Only sends a signal if at least one heel is correctly set up.

# On Ground

Sends 1 if the puppet is standing on a collidable object. Sends 0 if the puppet’s feet are in the air. Sends something in between while walking.

# Left Heel Strike

Sends a pulse when the puppet’s left heel steps on a surface the puppet can collide with.

# Right Heel Strike

Sends a pulse when the puppet’s right heel steps on a surface the puppet can collide with.

# Foot Impact

Sends a pulse when either foot’s heel steps on a surface the puppet can collide with.

# Outputs Page 2

# Velocity

The speed the puppet is moving.

# Acceleration

The acceleration of the puppet.

# Deceleration

The deceleration of the puppet.

# Lean Speed

The velocity of the puppet’s lean.

# Upper Body Movement

The velocity of the puppet’s upper body movement.

# Lower Body Movement

The velocity of the puppet’s lower body movement.

# Foot Scrape Amount

When the puppet has skateyness, sends a signal representing how much the feet are sliding across the surface.

# Jump Ascent

Sends a value while the puppet is not on the ground and is rising. While it has velocity upward, sends 1. As the upward velocity decreases, sends a lower value.

# Jump Peak

Sends a value while the puppet is not on the ground and has close to zero upward velocity. The closer upward acceleration is to 0, the closer the sent value is to 1.

# Jump Descent

Sends a value while the puppet is not on the ground and is falling. While it has velocity downward, sends 1. As the downward velocity decreases, sends a lower value.

# Sliding

Sends an “on” signal while the puppet is losing grip on a slope that is steeper than it can walk on.

# Randomiser

Contains the settings:

Sends a signal to a random output port. Similar to a selector. (Tg)

Outputs a signal to one of many outputs. (Jj)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Input to Randomise

If a wire is connected, whatever signal is sent to this port will be sent out to the currently selected output port.

If no wire is connected, an output of 1 will be sent.

# Randomise

When it first receives a signal, the active output port will be randomised. (Tg)

# Output Count

The number of output ports to be randomly selected between. Each port has a 1 in (output count) chance of being selected each time the gadget is randomised.

Note that you can have ports empty, and have the count be higher than the number of ports actually used. This can be useful for adding in random moments of nothing being selected.

# Randomise Mode

How the order in which channels will be randomly selected is constrained.

No Repeat

will not allow the same port to be selected twice in a row. (Tg)

Shuffle

will set the order of selections when the gadget is created or at the start of the scene. It will also loop through this order if randomised more times than the output count. (Tg)

Similar to a “seeded” random generator.

True Random

will select a random port every time, even if the same port is selected twice in a row. (Tg)

Note that if the same port is selected twice in a row the signal will simply continue to be sent with no break.

# Outputs

The active channel sends an “on” signal (1).

Or if there is a wire connected to the “Input to Randomise” input, that value is sent from the active channel.

# Active Port

Sends the index of the currently selected port. (Tg)

Note that this index is zero-based. So if the first port is selected, a 0 signal will be sent. If the second port is selected, a 1 will be sent.

# Rocket Rotator

Contains the tabs:

Rotates the attached object around its center of mass to “face” the direction it is moving in.

Note, by using a connector the joint will set the pivot point around which the rotator will rotate the object.
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# Rotation Speed

The target rotation speed when moving to the desired angle.

# Stay Upright

When on, will also try to not let the object “roll” but only “look” left, right, up, and down.

# Rotation Strength

The gadget’s ability to rotate the affected object(s) against other forces such as inertia, gravity and collisions.

# Overall Damping

The gadget’s ability to reduce undesired rotation.

# Strength Specifics

# Strength in X, Strength in Y, Strength in Z

Affects the strength differently for each axis of rotation.

# Outputs

# Affected Object(s)

The objects to affect the rotation of.

# Rotation Sensor

Contains the tabs:

Senses rotation of the attached object.

Gizmo:

An unmovable location marker at the centre-of-mass of the linked object.

When “Local Space” is on, shows axes that may be rotated.

Note that outputs are in radians. 180 degrees = Pi radians
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Important Properties & I/O (Input and Output)

# Angular Velocity (Overall)

The positive angular velocity in radians of the fastest-rotating linked object. (Tg)

Unsigned, meaning it’s always a positive number.

# Angular Velocity (X Axis), Angular Velocity (Y Axis), Angular Velocity (Z Axis)

The angular velocity in radians for the corresponding axis. Where there are multiple linked objects, this is OR#’d and the value furthest from 0 is used.

Signed, meaning it will be positive when rotating in one direction and negative when rotating in the opposite direction.

# Local Space

While on, the gadget will use its own axis orientation instead of the scene’s axes for judging rotational speed.

# Relative to Object

Rotation will be judged relative to the linked object.

For example, while the sensed object is rotating at 45 degrees/second and the reference object is rotating at 45 degrees/second, 0 will be output. If the reference object were rotating at 30 degrees/second, 0.261799 (-15 degrees) will be output.

# Outputs

# Angular Acceleration (Overall)

Sends the magnitude of all rotational acceleration (change in velocity).

# Angular Acceleration (X Axis), Angular Acceleration (Y Axis), Angular Acceleration (Z Axis)

Sends the rotational acceleration of the corresponding axis.

# Miscellaneous I/O (Input and Output)

# Sense Rotation

The object or objects to sense the rotation of.

# Orientation

Sends the object’s current orientation.

# Rotator

Contains the tabs:

Rotates the linked object around its centre of mass.

Note, by using a connector the joint will set the pivot point around which the rotator will rotate the object.
Gizmo:

positioned at the centre of mass of each affected object. This gizmo shows X, Y, and Z axes coming out of it. A circle is shown to indicate the axis the object will rotate around. And a stalk with a movable nub at the end is used to adjust this rotation axis.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# Rotation Speed

The target speed of the rotation. (Jj)

# Rotation Strength

The gadget’s ability to overcome physics while increasing its rotation to the target speed, such as the object’s inertia due to mass, gravity, friction, etc. (Jj)

# Overall Damping

The gadget’s ability to slow the rotation of the object when it is rotating too fast. (Jj)

# Local Space

When on, the rotation axis changes orientation with the gadget. When off, the rotation axis stays the same relative to the overall scene.

# Damping

The gadget’s ability to slow rotation to the target speed.

# Damp in X, Damp in Y, Damp in Z

Overall damping is multiplied for each axis.

# Rotator Direction Damping

A percentage of overall damping is used on the rotational axis of the gadget.

# Inputs & Outputs

# Affected Object(s)

All linked objects will be affected by this gadget.

# Direction of Rotation

The direction vector around which linked objects will rotate.

Does not work while Local Space is on.

# Ruler

Contains the settings:

Shows a rectangular transparent box in edit mode only. Used to measure distances for jumps, etc.

Also good for orienting yourself in a scene—for example, to help make sure rolling hills are still walkable.

Use the stretch tool to drag the sides of the ruler. Or while its tweak menu is open, use R2 to drag the sides without the stretch tool.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# X, Y, Z

Three sliders dictating the size of the ruler in meters.

# Rumbler

Contains the settings:

Rumbles controllers. Though in most cases, less is more.

Amount powered affects:

The intensity of the rumble is multiplied by the power received. When powered by a Player Info wire, only the corresponding players’ controllers will rumble.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

Tweak Menu

# Left Motor

The strength of the rumble of the left motor in the controller. This is the stronger of the two rumbles.

# Right Motor

The strength of the rumble of the right motor in the controller. This is the more subtle of the two rumbles.

# Controller Assignment

(See Hand Tracker > Controller Assignment.)

# Test Rumble

Press it once to preview the gadget’s rumble settings for 2 seconds, even when powered off.

# Score

Contains the settings:

Stores the current score, and can post it to a scoreboard of the same name. (Jj) To set the name of the scoreboard in the dream the scene is in, edit the name of the gadget itself. This name will also be used to define which score should be modified when using the score modifier gadget.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Initial Score

The initial score before it has been modified.

# Current Score

Sends the current score. (Jj)

If multiplayer is on, sends a Player Info fat wire containing each player’s current score. (Jj)

# Multiplayer

Splits each player’s score into a separate post to the scoreboard. Affects how score posting, output, and modification works.

If you want to have the score be counted as many players working together, leave this setting off so that it’s just a single score. (Jj)

# Score Increased

Sends a pulse when the score has increased. (Jj)

# Score Decreased

Sends a pulse when the score has decreased. (Jj)

# Post Score

When triggered and playing this scene from inside an uploaded dream, posts the score to the dreamiverse. (Jj) If the score posted is the best on the scoreboard, a notification will say they beat the high score. If a player’s score is posted that’s better than their previous high score a notification will say they beat their own score.

If the version of the dream you are currently playing is uploaded privately but it has been uploaded publicly at some point, then no scores will be posted.

If a score is posted for a player that is “better” than a score previously posted by that player—as defined by the scoreboard settings in the dream—a notification will pop up announcing their new high score. (See Scoreboard > “Better score is…”.)

If the version of the dream is private but it has been uploaded publicly at some point, then this message will only appear if there has already been a score of the same name posted to the public version. Also, the message will add that the score has not been posted because you are not playing the released version of the dream.

When multiplayer is on, if the “post score” input receives a signal that is a Player Info fat wire, only players for whom the corresponding player info signal is non-zero will be posted. (Jj) (Jj) However, if a simple “on” (1) signal is sent to this input, all stored scores will be posted. (Jj)

# Score Modifier

Contains the settings:

Accesses the current score, normally based on the set Operation Value. (Jj)

When the associated score gadget has “multiplayer” on, you can power a modifier with different values for each player by using a Player Info wire, to have them affect those players’ scores. (Jj) (Jj)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Score Name

The name of the score to modify. You can cycle through all named score gadgets in the scene by hovering over the text box and pressing up/down on the d-pad.

# Operation Type

How the modifier will affect the current score.

Set

will set the score’s value to the Operation Value. (Jj)

Get

will get the score’s current value without changing it. (Jj)

Add

will add the Operation Value to the score. (Jj)

Reset

will set the score to its initial value.

# Update Type

Unavailable:

when in “Get” mode.

Dictates when the score will update while powered.

When Powered

will modify the score when the gadget is first powered.

Continuous

will constantly modify the score each frame while the gadget is powered. (Jj)

# Operation Value

The number to use to modify the score, based on the current Operation Type.

When the variable has “multiplayer” turned on and a Player Info wire is setting this value, connected players’ scores will be indpenedently modified according to the values in the wire.

# Current Value

Available:

when in “Get” mode.

Outputs the same as the Score gadget’s Current Score output.

# Selector

Contains the settings:

Outputs a signal to one of many outputs. (Jj)

Good for setting up modes of behaviour or states of an object. (Tg)

When in “passthrough” mode, the signal sent is taken from the active port’s input. If the active port has an input, that value is sent. If the active port does not have an input, 1 is sent.

When not in “passthrough” mode, 1 is sent.

Good for making menus (Tg), grid menus (Tg), and modes of any kind (Tg).

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Selection Count

The number of selections used.

# Selections

Labelled as A - J. Selections beyond the port count are greyed out.

A selection’s output port sends an “on” signal, while selected. If “passthrough” mode is active and a wire is connected to the input of a channel, that received value will be sent out of the channel while it is the active channel.

If nothing is wired into the “active port” input and the signal sent into a channel becomes positive, this triggers that channel to become the active channel. (Tg)

Note that if the signal started positive from the start of the scene, it didn’t “become” positive and so will not trigger this change. To do this from the start of the scene will require at least 1 frame where the signal is non-positive, and then 1 frame where the signal is positive. This can be done using a timeline. (Tg)

# Next Selection

Changes the current selection to the next one in the list. If this would go beyond the selection count, the current selection will be the first one.

# Previous Selection

Changes the current selection to the previous one in the list. If this would go beyond the first selection, the current selection will be the last one.

# Passthrough

Sets the gadget to “passthrough” mode. (Tg)

# Active Port

Gets or sets the currently selected selection. The input value is rounded down (floored) to choose which channel is selected. Note, however, that the channel numbers begin at 0; so A = 0, B = 1, etc. If a negative value is received, the first channel becomes active. If a value greater than the last channel is received, the last channel becomes active. (Pk)

# Signal Generator

Contains the settings:

Generates a signal that changes over time. (Pk) The signal is based on a sine wave, though you can get different shapes to the signal depending on the settings.

Can also be used to generate random values. (Tg) (Tg) And can even be used to shuffle the order of a set of items. (Tg)

A “sweep” is defined as the values generated from a minimum to a maximum or maximum to a minimum.

The max and min value ranges are tied into a single 4-value input and output. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Signal

Sends the current value of the generated signal.

# Sweep Seconds

How long it takes to go through a single sweep of values.

# Phase Offset

Moves through 0 - 1. How long it takes to do this is dictated by the sweep seconds setting.

# Pause Time Range

This dictates how long the signal will “hang” at the highest and lowest values. (Tg)

# Max Value Range

Contains a range slider pair for the maximum value range.

This dictates the highest value reached by a given sweep.

# Min Value Range

Contains a range slider pair for the minimum value range.

This dictates the lowest value reached by a given sweep.

# Signal Wave

A non-interactive representation of the shape of the curve over time.

# Signal Manipulator

Contains the settings:

Manipulates input signals in various ways, and outputs them again.

On the face of the gadget two bars are shown representing the original input value and the manipulated output value scaled according to their ranges. (Jj) (Jj) (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Input/Output

The input to be manipulated and the manipulated output. These inputs and outputs are shown on the gadget. (Tg)

# Remapper Mode

Dictates the high-level way input signals are manipulated.

Smoothing Only:

Does nothing extra to manipulate the values itself. (Jj) (Jj)

Outputs the same fat wire type as the input.

Pulse On Input On:

will send a pulse of 1 for a single logic frame when the input becomes more than or equal to 1, or less than or equal to -1. (Tg) (Jj) (Jj)

Invert:

Maps the input range from 0 to 1 into the output range 1 to 0. Another way to look at it is it subtracts the input from 1. (Tg) (Jj) (Jj)

For example, -0.2 becomes 1 - (-0.2) = 1.2, and 0.7 becomes 1 - (0.7) = 0.3.

Outputs the same wire type as the input, and manipulates each fat-wire value individually.

Custom Remapper:

allows you to manipulate the signal more specifically, using a number of other settings. (Jj) (Jj) (Tg)

# Remap Thresholds

Available:

when in “Custom Remapper” mode.

This is a line graph representation of the input signal on the left and output signal on the right. The input signal will be squashed or stretched to fit into the output range. (Tg)

On both sides there are “maximum” and “minimum” horizontal lines. Drag these using Cross button to adjust them. (Tg) While “Edge Mode” is set to “none” (the default), the input value will be identified relative to the input max/min and mapped to the output max/min. (Jj) Adjustment using up/down on the dpad works on these values.

For example, the input range is 1 to 2, and the output range is 10 to 20, and an input value of 1.5 is received. This is halfway through the input range. So the halfway mark of the output range is found, which is 15. And the value 15 is outputted.
Now say the input -1 is received. This is -1 through the input range. The same -1 position in the output range would be -10. So the value -10 is outputted.

There are two buttons on the graph:

Learn Input Range

is over the input side of the graph, and appears when time is running or paused. While held, the maximum and minimum values will be adjusted to include the range of values currently shown in the input graph. So when clicked, it will use whatever values are in the graph at that moment and adjust for those. (Tg)

Invert Input

is to the right of the graph. Click this to flip the minimum and maximum of the output range settings. (Tg)

Input and Output:

The components correspond to the following (Tg):

Input Minimum

Input Maximum

Output Minimum

Output Maximum

# Remap Curve

Available:

when in “Custom Remapper” mode.

Shapes the output curve when the value would normally be beyond its range limits. A special button that displays the name of the shaping mode, as well as a preview of how the outputted curve will be affected by it. (Tg)

Click on it with Cross button will cycle through the modes.

No shaping:

Does not shape the curve at all. This means that if the input is beyond the specified range, the output will still be scaled relative to the output range. This means the output can be beyond the limits of the specified range. This is the behaviour for other remapper modes also. (Jj)

Flip values below Minimum:

Will invert values that would be below the output range’s minimum. For example, if the output range minimum is set to 1, and the value would be 0.2, the difference (-0.8) would be added to the output range minimum before outputting the value, sending 1.8 instead. Note that if the value would be above the range maximum, those values will be unaffected. (Jj)

Clamp values:

Ensures all values output are within the range. Any values that would be above the maximum or below the minimum will snap to the range maximum and range minimum instead. (Jj)

Ease in:

Causes values to be multiplied by how far they are away from the range minimum towards the range maximum. Values beyond the range minimum are clamped to the range minimum. If you wire up a value that increases over time, the output will appear to increase slower than normal until it reaches “full speed” near the range maximum.

Ease out:

Uses a similar algorithm to “Ease in” but compares to the range maximum instead.

Ease In & Out:

Uses a combination of “Ease in” and “Ease out” to slow at the range minimum and maximum. Also clamps beyond the range minimum and maximum.

Threshold:

Will output the range maximum if the value is equal to or greater than the range maximum. Otherwise it will output the range minimum. (Jj)

# Smooth Rise, Smooth Fall

Smoothly changes the output to the target value over time. (Tg) (Jj) (Jj)

When the output would become a larger number, the output “eases out” to that value over the “Smooth Rise” duration.

When the output would become a smaller number, output “eases out” to that value over the “Smooth Fall” duration. (See Remap Curve.)

Renamed when in “Pulse” mode.

# Freeze Output

While on, the output value will not change, but whatever the output was at the moment this was turned on will continue to be sent. (Tg) (Tg) (Jj) (Jj)

Using this feature, a live signal can be frozen each time some logic is triggered. (Tg) This can control a timeline to create a stuttering or stop-motion effect to an existing animation. (Tg)

The fact that you can freeze many values at the same time means you can store many values in a single signal manipulator, which if used correctly can save you a lot of thermo. You can even use a destroyer to destroy other gadgets that generated these signals once they’ve served their purpose. (Jj)

# Edge Mode

Special ways of reacting to “edges.” An “edge” is marked by an input value going from below the high input threshold to meet it or go above it (an “on” edge), or from above the low input threshold to meet it or go below it (an “off” edge). (Tg)

Note that the toggle function will start at “off,” sending the output minimum. If the edge mode is changed to another toggle mode, the toggle state will be preserved. If changed to “none,” the output will update but the toggle state will be restored when it is changed back to a toggling mode. If changed to a pulse mode, the toggle state is reset to “off.”
The pulsing outputs can be used to find out if a value is going from below a value to above a value or vice versa. (Tg)
None

will not use any edge features.

Pulse at ON

will pulse when an on edge is received. (Tg)

Pulse at OFF

will pulse when an off edge is received. (Tg)

Pulse at ON or OFF

will pulse when an on or off edge is received. (Tg)

Toggle at ON

will toggle between sending the output maximum and minimum when an on edge is received.

Toggle at OFF

will toggle between sending the output maximum and minimum when an off edge is received.

Toggle at ON or OFF

will toggle between sending the output maximum and minimum when on on or off edge is received.

# Bypass

When active, input values will be passed directly to the output without manipulation. (Tg) (Jj)

A number of switches, one for each value of the input wire. So if the input is a fat wire with multiple values, there will be one switch for each value carried by that fat wire. Also shows “nested” values such as a Transform’s position X value. (Jj)

Can be changed during play using a keyframe. (Tg)

# Sound

Contains the tabs:

A completely new sound gadget can only be made by making a new recording. This can easily be converted into an instrument. (Tg)

A “slice” is the name for a sample of an audio recording.

Anywhere in the sound’s tweak menu where you see the waveform of the recording, while the sample is being played, circles appear and move along the sample. These represent each part of the sample that is currently being played.

Note that some tabs have a large circular “on” button at the top for that entire tab. Remember to turn it on, or none of those settings will be in effect.

“14 tabs on the tweak menu? What the hell?!” —People inside Media Molecule (at first). (Mm)

Sound gadgets can be used outside of a timeline, and powered by logic to play them.

Using shift +Cross button on any sound gadget’s windows or to open the gadget’s window will change the mode to Sound Mode.

A note or playthrough may begin before the slice it requires has properly loaded. If so, it may play back in the incorrect octave. To ensure this isn’t heard during a music track, copy the sound gadget to the start of the timeline and set its volume to 0. Now if that problem does happen, it won’t be heard by the player. (Tg)

While dragging a sound gadget, hover over another target sound gadget. It will throb. Drop the on you are holding to replace the one being hovered over. The target gadget will be replaced by the held gadget, apart from its notes which will be transfered to the held gadget.

Amount powered affects:

The received power multiplies the Volume of the output.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.015166666666666667% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

When moved onto a timeline, the playback speed will be set to that of the timeline. The progress through the clip will inherit from the playhead of the parent timeline. (Tg)

Scope-in to:

open the sound window (Tg).

# Spice

You can set a “Spicy” state of the instrument settings, much like a keyframe. Hold L2 and adjust the settings. Now when performing, use L2 to interpolate between the non-spicy settings and the spicy settings. (Mm) To remove spiciness from a setting, use Triangle button on it (Mm). Note that if a slider has been split into a range, that range size will hold for the spicy and non-spicy setting. (Mm)

# Window

Here, you can manipulate what is played when the gadget is activated.

The piano roll view is only available for sound gadgets in instrument mode.

Along the top-left are 3 buttons:

Metronome: When this switch is on, a metronome will play as the clip plays.
Count In: When this switch is on, a 1, 2, 3, 4 count-in will sound in the same style as the metronome. (Mm) Note that switching on this flag automatically switches on the metronome also.
Clear Recording: Use this button to delete all recorded notes in the gadget. Only available when there is something recorded.

As well as the 3 buttons along the top-right that are a part of all windows in Dreams, there are 3 extra buttons that change the window to the Performance, Piano Roll, or Slice Mapper view.

# Performance View

When first opening the window, the view defaults to performance mode. (Mm) (Tg) If this view had been previously changed to a different one, that view will be opened instead.

When changing to the performance view, you will be taken into performance mode, so that you can play in the window. (Tg)

Notes that have been recorded will appear in the performance window as lines where those notes where performed. They will be thinner where the volume is quieter and thicker where the volume is louder. While holding a note, Up button or secondary Circle button and Tilt primary motion controller left increases the volume of the entire note until the whole note is full volume. And Down button or secondary Circle button and Tilt primary motion controller right decreases the volume until the whole note is the minimum volume.

When the clip is playing, the notes are rendered in 3D behind the window. As they meet the window they disappear and play. (Tg)

Notes can be selected using Cross button. Selected notes will still be selected in other window modes.

A note’s colour is light blue, but shifts towards purple depending on how “spicy” it is.

Effect Field gadgets can be brought into the performance window. These fields will take effect while a note is being played within its influence, as shown by a circular colour around the gadget. (Tg)

Sound gadgets can be brought into the performance window also. These work the same way for performance but have a rectangular shape. (Tg) Note that effect fields and notes within such instruments will not be triggered while inside a containing performance window. (Tg)

Any gadget can also be added to the window, but these don’t have any special behaviour attached to them.

# Piano Roll View

A piano roll lets you manipulate notes recorded in performance mode, as well as new ones.

To the left of the window is a bar displaying all notes, or if it’s more of a series of samples like a drum kit, it will display icons for each d-pad and face button corresponding to which buttons play which sample in performance mode. You can click on these buttons to preview the sound they make.

In the main window, the notes are displayed as lines going from left to right which shows when they will begin and end—much like in a timeline. Hovering over the main window will show the letter notation for the rows, to the right of the nearest bar mark.

You can drag notes around like you would drag objects around in the scene. Dragging from the right edge of a note lets you change its length. Note that there is no way of changing a note’s length from dragging from the left edge using R2. (Tg)

Select notes with Cross button. Selected notes will still be selected in other window modes. (Tg)

You can clone and multi-clone notes as you would in the scene. (Mm)

The top/bottom/left/right of the window can be adjusted using Cross button. (Tg) This is how to see different octaves in the piano roll view.

The view can be scaled using the same controls as for a timeline. (Tg)

All notes within chosen columns can be selected by holding L1, and dragging with Cross button while hovering over the top row where the bar numbers are shown. Use the same shortcut on the piano keys or button icons on the left of the window to selector notes on entire rows. (Tg)

# Slice Mapper View

The slice mapper shows all audio samples the instrument uses, and allows adjusting settings for these slices such as the note it represents, the spiciness it will activate on, and where the slice begins and ends.

You can drag existing instruments or sound gadgets into the slice mapper to add those slices to the gadget. (Bg)

Slices can have spiciness set, so that they are only used when the note that is being played is closer to its own spiciness setting than other slices’ spiciness settings. This means that depending on the spiciness of the note, different groups of samples can be used even from the same instrument. (Bg)

If Slice Keytracking is enabled, slices can have a note assigned to them.

If Multilanguage on, slices can have a language assigned to them. (Tg)

# Slice Selection

Note: does change spiciness cut out the slice? and while playing notes? check if the second component of any value will be used for row.

Each time a slice is required to play, the slices are filtered down to an acceptable set depending on the circumstances to find which slice to use using the following requirements:

If the Multi-language setting is on and there are slices that are marked as the same language as the player’s PS4 settings, only those slices can be played.

Only slices with a spiciness setting closest to the current Spiciness setting can be played. Note that if the spiciness changes halfway through and the currently playing slice is no longer among the slices with the closest spiciness setting, that play will cut out. If powered with a Music wire or playing a note in instrument mode, its spiciness setting will be used for comparison instead.

With Row Mapping enabled:

  • If in sound effect mode, the second component of the powering wire—normally the Surface Type of a Collision wire or the Button of a Music wire—only a slice from the corresponding row may be selected from.
  • If in instrument mode, this is taken from the Button component of the currently played note.
  • If no slices are present on the corresponding row, the default row (Cross button for instruments, or Default for sound effects) is used instead.

With Slice Keytracking enabled:

  • If in sound effect mode and powered with a Music wire, only slices with the closest note setting to the required Note component of the wire can be selected. The playback of this slice will be adjusted according to the Vari-speed setting to match the required note.
  • If in instrument mode, this is taken from the Note component of the currently played note.

If there is only one allowed slice remaining, that one is selected. While there are more than one allowed slices remaining the following steps filter them down further, in order:

  • Only slices that were not the previously played slice may be selected.
  • A random slice is selected.

# Replacing

Note: How do keyframes work with this?

While holding a sound gadget with R2, hover it over another sound gadget to see the target gadget throb. Let go of R2 to drop the held gadget onto the target gadget. The target gadget will be replaced, but any recorded notes will be transferred over to the new gadget.

# Sound Tab

# Volume

The volume of each note played. (Tg)

# ADSR (Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release)

This controls the fade in or fade out of each playthrough. (Mm) The acronym stands for: Attack, how long it takes to get to full volume; Decay, how long it takes to get from full volume to the sustain volume; Sustain, the volume level the slice will play at until released; Release, how long it takes for the slice to fade out. (Tg)

# Speed/Tempo

Unavailable:

when in “Sound Effect” mode.

The speed the recorded notes will play at. Doesn’t affect how the slices sound, only how quickly it will play through the notes. (Tg)

# Start Time Offset

Where playback will begin, a percentage through each slice. (Tg) (Mm)

The Split Slider controls work with this setting.

# Clip Playback Mode

(See Action Recorder > Playback Mode.)
Available:

while using the ’Instrument’ sound type.

How the clip’s playback will react to being powered. (Tg)

Note, this has no “ping-pong” mode.

# Slice Playback Mode

(See Action Recorder > Playback Mode.)

Slice playback mode affects how the slice moves through the sample while playing.

Once and Sustain modes limit the maximum duration in a timeline to the length of the clip. Loop and Sustain modes will allow you to drag the clip beyond the clip’s normal duration. Loop mode will extend extra loops out, showing faded repeats of the clip. Sustain mode will expand the length of the clip, or add a trim to the end when dragging it to a smaller duration.

Note that the fade-out handle will not work while in “Once” mode.

# Sound Type

When in sound effect mode, a slice begins when the gadget is powered, and ends when the gadget is unpowered. When in instrument mode, a slice begins when a note starts, and ends when that note ends. Note that multiple slices may play at once from the same gadget, depending on the settings.

Sound Effect

This type has no unique features. It simply plays one of its slices when it receives power.

Instrument

This type has the unique feature of allowing you to play the same sound clip at different pitches using the performance mode or the piano roll. (Mm)

# Pitch Tab

Adjusts the speed of the note played, resulting in a higher or lower pitch.

Note this does not affect which slice is selected. For example, a slice is marked as C4 and another marked as C#4. When a C4 note is played, the C4 slice will be used. If the instrument has a coarse pitch shift of +1 semitone, the C4 slice is still used but played the equivalent of one semitone higher.

# Coarse Pitch Shift

Adjusts the speed that clips are played by full semi-tones. (Tg)

When a random range is added, any non-integer value can be used for a given note, not just whole semi-tones.

# Fine Pitch Shift (Cents)

Tunes the notes played by a percentage of 1 semi-tone. (Tg)

# Home Octave

Dictates which octave is default in performance mode. (Tg)

# Glide

For notes that pitch bend, decides how long it takes to adjust to the new note—“smoothing” this change. This applies to notes performed with Legato, pitch bending with the touchpad, and effect or logic-controlled changes to pitch. (Tg)

# Random Note Drop

Each time a note would be played, it has this chance of not playing. (Tg)

# Panning

# Speaker Name

The name of a speaker gadget in the scene that will be used to output the audio from this gadget. If empty, any speaker gadget without a name will be used. (Tg) (Tg)

If there is more than one matching speaker gadget, the priority is based on: the speaker in the same chip, the speaker in a chip within the same chip as the source audio, the speaker created first.

If there is an applicable speaker, the other “Panning” tab settings are disabled.

# Surround Pan

Note: Research more how these can be moved and changed.

A circular graph representing the direction the audio will seem to play from. (Tg)

Displays dots on the outside of the circle representing the audio output channels, showing them larger when more audio will be sent through them and smaller when less audio will be sent through them.

Within the graph are 3 movable dots. The central black dot represents the centre of the stereo “image,” and there is a dot either side representing the left channel output of the sound gadget, and the right channel output.

# Stereo Balance

Adjusts the ratio of volume given to the left and right channels. When moved all the way to the left, for example, the left channel will become twice as loud and the right channel will go to 0% volume. (Tg)

# Stereo Width

Dictates how far from the central dot the left and right channels are. If the width is large, the audio will seem to come from all around you. If the width is narrow, the audio will seem to come from a very specific location. (Tg)

# Rear Speakers Volume

How loud the audio will play over the “rear” channel output from the PS4. (Tg) When listening without a rear channel, this is used to say how loud a “3D Panned” sound will be when it is behind the camera.

# Pan Style

Decides which audio output channels will be sent the audio from this gadget. (Tg)

Stereo

This audio will play through the left and right channels.

Normal & Centre

This audio will play through the left, right, and centre channels when available.

Sub Only

This audio will only play through the sub channel when available.

Controller

When not playing over headphones, this audio will play through the in-built speakers of all active controllers.

# 3D Panning

Places the sound at a position in the scene. The audio coming from this gadget will be affected based on the position and angle of the camera relative to this position. (Tg)

While the camera view is inside the inner bubble, the volume of the audio will be full. As it leaves the bubble and moves towards the outer radius the volume falls off.

Because this is based on the camera’s position and orientation, if the camera is far away from the object in the scene the 3D panning bubble may be too far away to be heard. To get around this and still have proximity affect the volume of a sound, a Trigger Zone may be used instead. (Tg)

The audio also comes from the direction relative to the view. For example, if the sound’s centre is on the left of the current view it will be louder from the left channels.

To have the audio volume etc. be affected by some other position such as the puppet to allow you to freely move the camera, the volume of a sound gadget can be controlled using a trigger zone to get a similar effect.

Note, the settings on this tab will be overridden when being output through a Speaker gadget.

# Auto 3D Panning

Turns on the 3D Panning settings.

# Fade Zone: Inner Radius

The radius of the inner bubble.

# Fade Zone: Outer Radius Multiplier

Dictates the radius of the outer falloff relative to the inner bubble.

# Extra Reverb Radius

The further towards the edge of the fall off the view is, the more reverb the audio has—multiplied by this setting.

For example, at 0% no extra reverb will be added at the outer edge of the fall off. At 50%, half the reverb will be added.

# Distance Muffle

This adjusts the allowed frequency range as the view becomes further out towards the edge of the falloff.

Includes a frequency setting (left/right) which sets the centre of the frequencies left intact, and a muffle amount setting (up/down) which decides how thin the allowed band of frequencies is.

# Sound FX

Sound effects built in to every sound.

# Delay

How loud the delay is that plays after the audio. (Tg)

# Delay Channel

Which delay channel will be used for this sound. These delay channels sound different by default, and can be further customised using a delay channel gadget.

Delay A

Sends the audio to delay channel A.

Delay B

Sends the audio to delay channel B.

Delay C

Sends the audio to delay channel C.

Delay D

Sends the audio to delay channel D.

# Reverb

Up to 100% will add reverb based on the sound (turns up the “wet” effect). Above that up to 200% removed the original sound and just keeps the reverb (turns down the “dry” original audio). (Tg)

# Reverb Channel

Which reverb channel will be used for this sound. These reverb channels sound different by default and can be further customised using reverb channel gadgets.

Reverb A

Uses reverb channel A (Music 1). Sounds like the sound is playing in a cathedral. (Mm)

Reverb B

Uses reverb channel B (Music 2).

Reverb C

Uses reverb channel C (Game 1). A touch of reverb makes the space sound real. (Mm)

Reverb D

Uses reverb channel D (Game 2).

# Spiciness

If a performance captured use of spiciness, the slider value is blended with the recording, allowing you to adjust the overall spiciness of the same recording. As this is a tweak menu setting, you can set it with logic. (Mm) (Tg)

Affects how the instrument sounds in whatever ways are set.

# Freeform Offset

A rectangular graph representing the performance window.

Offsets all notes played, within the performance window. This can cause them to trigger different effect fields or embedded instruments. (Tg)

Notes that would be pushed beyond the edge of the performance window will stick to the edge instead.

Embedded effect fields are shown as bright circles, with the inner radius shown less brightly, and the outer radius shown less brightly still. Embedded instruments are shown similarly but as rectangles instead.

Input and Output:

Freemform X Offset sends a Number. Freeform Y Offset sends a Number

# Granular Synthesis

Granular synthesis means that instead of playing an entire slice of audio, that slice is played a tiny bit at a time. These mini-slices are called “grains.” Each grain has a shape to it, meaning its volume increases and then decreases over time, and they overlap to make up the difference in volume. (Tg)

When the settings are at the defaults, things sound exactly the same as if the normal slice is played. But messing with these settings can give you all sorts of interesting effects.

When turned on, the sound is played as “grains”—tiny slices of the sample. This lets you mess with the audio at a much finer level and get all sorts of interesting effects. (Mm)

The overlap of the grains affects how they merge together into one sound. If you lessen the overlap, you will hear longer gaps in the audio. If you increase the overlap, you will hear fewer gaps in the audio.

Grain shape affects how the volume of the grain changes over time. If you give it a left slant, each grain will come in at 100% volume and go down to 0%.

The interval setting affects how long the next grain waits before being played. So at 0%, it is played when it would be in real time. Whereas -10% will play it 90% through the previous grain. (Mm)

# Granular Synthesis

Turns on all settings on this tab.

# Start Time Offset

(See Sound Gadget > Start Time Offset.)

A shortcut to manipulate the normal Start Time Offset setting.

# Time Stretch

How much farther through the slice a grain will be relative to what was used by the previous grain. When negative, the grain will be further back through the slice instead. (Tg)

Using this, you can make the slice play in reverse perfectly.

# Shape

The shape of the grains can be previewed and manipulated here, using nodes on the central grain shape.

Grain Shape

is a node at the top of the grain. Drag it left or right to adjust the ramp up and ramp down ratio of all grains. I/O: Spice & Randomisation. (Mm)

Overlap

can be adjusted using either of the 2 nodes at the bottom of the grain. Drag them left or right to adjust how much overlap there is with the other grains. If there is less overlap there can be dips in the audio where it cannot be heard, for example. I/O: Spice & Randomisation. (Mm)

# Interval

How long before the next grain will play. Negatives will give strange effects. (Tg)

# Beat Sync Grain Interval

When on and the gadget is on a timeline, the Interval will snap to powers of the timeline’s tempo. (Tg)

# Pitch Affects Interval Length

When on, the note being played will automatically adjust the interval. (Tg)

# Granular Randomisation

Randomises (“jitters”) certain aspects of a grain each time a new grain is played.

# Granular Randomisation

Turns on the settings on this tab.

# Start Time Jitter

Adjusts the start time of the part of the slice the grain will play. (Tg)

# Grain Reverse

The chance of the grain being played in reverse. (Tg)

# Pan Jitter

How different the panning can be adjusted for that grain. (Tg)

# Pitch Jitter

How much the speed of the grains can be changed. (Tg)

# Shape

(See Sound Gadget > Grain Shape.)

A shortcut to the grain shape graph.

# Shape Jitter

How much the shape of the grain can be adjusted. (Tg)

# Interval Jitter

How much the interval can be adjusted—effectively how late or early grains can play. (Tg)

# Length Jitter

How much the length (or “overlap”) of each grain can be adjusted. (Tg)

# Volume Jitter

How much quieter a grain can be played at.

# Grain Drop

The chance of the grain not being played. (Tg)

# Oscillator

Plays a waveform based on the pitch of the note being played, and combines it with the audio in different ways.

# Oscillator

Turns on the settings of this tab.

# Oscillator Mode

How the oscillator’s waveform will affect and be affected by the slice being played.

Mix Mode:

Plays the waveform audio alongside the slice audio. (Tg)

Envelope Follower Mode:

The volume of the oscillator output will adjust to match the slice’s volume. (Tg)

Ring Mod:

The oscillator is multiplied by the slice. Good for robotic voices. (Tg)

Frequency Modulation 1:

The oscillator’s pitch is changed by the slice. (Tg)

Frequency Modulation 2:

The slice’s pitch is changed by the slice. (Tg)

# Mix

How much of the slice audio and the oscillator audio is output. At -100% only the slice audio is output. At 100% only the oscillator’s audio is output. At 0%, both are heard at full volume. (Tg)

# Wave Shape

The shape of the waveform that is generated. This can really change how the oscillator sounds. The negative numbers have variants on a sine wave. The positive numbers have more jagged abrasive-sounding waveforms. (Tg)

# Pitch (Coarse)

The pitch in semitones relative to the currently played note. (Tg)

# Fine Pitch

A finer adjustment to the pitch of the oscillator, in the percentage of a semitone. (Tg)

# Oscillator Envelope

How the volume of the oscillator changes over time. (Tg) Similar to the ADSR setting, but the oscillator output is capped by the ADSR setting itself.

# Filter

# Filter

Turns on the settings on this tab.

# Resonant Filter

Resonant filtering is a different kind of EQ effect. The graph shows how the frequencies are affected by the filter. Move the node left and right on the graph to adjust the point at which higher frequencies will be cut off. Move the node up and down on the graph to adjust the volume boost given to the frequencies just below the cut-off point. (Mm) (Tg)

You can hold shift and expand the node in the graph, also. (At)

# ADSR Envelope

Affects how the depth setting is applied over time, rather than the volume of the filter’s output. (Tg)

Each part has a similar effect as the sound’s ADSR setting.

# Pitch Envelope Depth

How much of the original frequencies are outputted. So a lower value will cause the frequencies to the right of the filter line to be more muffled. Also affects how pronounced the resonance tone will be. 100% will leave the slice audio untouched. (Tg)

# Pitch Affects Cutoff

When on, higher pitches will be affected by the filter less, as if the filter setting was moved to the right. (Tg)

# Distortion

Move the node on the graph to adjust the amount and type of distortion applied to the sound.

Soft clipper (Mm)

# Distortion

Turns on the settings on this tab.

# Distortion Amount, Wave Shape

A graphical representation of the type and intensity of the distortion.

Moving the node left to right will make the distortion have more effect. Moving the node bottom to top will blend between different types of distortion. (Tg)

The distortion types are, from top to bottom:

  • Scream
  • Wave folder
  • Soft Clipper
  • Asymmetric Clipper
  • Bit Crusher

# Chorus & Delay

Chorus repeats the exact same audio output (Mm) at slightly different pitches.

(Tg)

# Chorus & Delay

Turns the settings in this tab on.

# Chorus & Delay Amount

The mix of the original audio and the delay volume. 0% means the delay will be muted. 100% means the original audio will be muted but the delay will be at full volume. And 50% means the original audio and delay audio will both be at full volume. (Tg) (Tg) (Mm)

Note that the volume of the delay is capped by the gadget’s ADSR.

# Delay

Moving the node left to right will increase the time between delays. At the top, each delay will be at full volume. Moving towards the middle will make each successive repeat be quieter than the last. In the middle the repeats will have no volume. Going below the middle makes the delay bounce between left and right stereo channels. (Tg)

# Chorus LFO (Low Frequency Oscillator)

A graphical representation of the sine wave used to adjust the delay time.

Moving the node from bottom to top adjusts the amplitude of the wave, and so affects how much the delay time is adjusted. Moving the node from left to right adjusts the frequency of the wave, and so affects how quickly the delay time is changed. (Tg)

# Beat Sync Delay Time

When on, the delay time will snap to powers of the BPM the clip is being played at. (Tg)

# EQ

The graph shows a black line representing how the frequencies are affected by the equaliser settings. There is a grey line showing the neutral state that would not affect the frequency output of the sound gadget. Any part where the black line is above the grey line is boosting those frequencies. Any part where the black line is below the grey line, it is attenuating (turning down) those frequencies.

You can drag the black nodes on the graph itself with Cross button to adjust the EQ. (Mm) There are 4 bands with nodes. You can adjust the width of these bands (how broadly the black line is affected by the node) by holding shift and dragging from the node left or right. (Mm) (Tg)

# EQ

Turns on the settings in this tab.

# EQ Filter

A graphical representation of how different frequencies are affected. Where the line is above the default, those frequencies will be boosted. Where the line is below the default, those frequencies will be dampened. (Tg)

When adjusting a node in the graph, hold shift to adjust its bandwidth—the range of frequencies that node affects. For a “shelf” type node, this will also affect the steepness of the gradient it applies to the frequencies.

When dragging from the left or right edge, the node to be affected is the one whose input and output tabs are along that row of the graph.

Input and Output:

The bands correspond to nodes in the graph, of a filter type:

Band 1

is a Low Shelf filter

Band 2

is a Bell filter

Band 3

is a Bell filter

Band 4

is a High Shelf filter

Each is a 3 Numbers fat wire, mapping like this:

Component

Values

Frequency Centre for the node

0 at low-end frequencies, 1 at high-end frequencies

Gain for the node

-2 to cut completely, 0 to leave the frequencies unaffected, 1 to fully boost.

Bandwidth for the node

-1 for the thinnest range, to 4 for the widest range

# Low Cut Frequency

Cuts frequencies below the designated limit. (Tg) (Mm)

# High Cut Frequency

Cuts frequencies above the designated limit. (Tg) (Mm)

# Dynamics Compressor

Affects the volume of the output as it is played. (Tg)

# Dynamics Compressor

Turns on the settings in this tab.

# Compression

Compressing the dynamics of audio makes the loud parts quieter and the quiet parts louder so everything evens out.

Move the node left to right to increase the amount the audio will be compressed. Move the node bottom to top to increase the “dirtiness,” or how quickly the compression kicks in. (Tg)

# Sidechain Channel

Which sidechain channel will be used by the sidechain setting.

Sidechain Channel A

Send or receive from sidechain channel A.

Sidechain Channel B

Send or receive from sidechain channel B.

Sidechain Channel C

Send or receive from sidechain channel C.

Sidechain Channel D

Send or receive from sidechain channel D.

# Sidechain Amount

How the sound will interact with the sidechain channel. (Tg)

At the middle, the sound will not be affected and will not affect the channel. To the right, the sound sends its output into the channel—even if the volume of the gadget is set to 0. (Tg) To the left, the sound will become quieter proportional to how much audio is being sent into the channel (known as “ducking”).

The effect of the “ducking” fades in and out over a small amount of time.

On the right side of the slider, a visual representation of how much audio is in the channel is shown. And to the left, how much the receiving sounds will be ducked by the channel.

The icon on the slider is a duck while in the middle, a greater-than sign while to the right, and a less-than sign while to the left.

# Outputs

# Is Playing

Sends a signal while a note is being played.

# Per Beat Trigger

Sends a pulse each time a beat starts.

# Per Bar Trigger

Sends a pulse each time a bar starts.

# On End Trigger

Sends a pulse each time the end of the clip is reached, including loops.

# Note On

Sends a pulse each time a note starts.

# Note Off

Sends a pulse each time a note ends.

# Composite Note Data

All data regarding the note currently being played.

This output always locks to the latest note that started, or for a tie the last note that was created. When that note ends the output stops and zeroes out.

# Envelope

The current volume of the output of this gadget.

Note this is taken from the slices played, and ignores effects.

While any note is playing, outputs the volume of the longest slice as if it began playing at the start of the note until the end of the note.

# Options

# Gadget Colour

Dictates the hue of the gadget.

From 1% to 99%, goes from red to green to blue to red. At 0% and 100%, the colour becomes grey/white. (Tg)

# Polyphonic Limit

How many “voices” (eg. notes) can be played at the same time. (Tg)

This always locks to the latest note that started, or for a tie the last note that was created. Older notes are cancelled with a hard cutoff regardless of the release settings they have. When a note ends the output stops and zeroes out.

# Vari-Speed

When on, plays slices at different speeds to adjust their pitch. When off, the gadget will use granular synthesis to play the slice at the same speed but play each grain slower to make it sound lower. (Tg)

# Row Mapping

In instrument mode, when on, each row of the slice mapper is associated with a different button. Pressing that button will play a slice from that row. When there are no slices in the corresponding row, the first row (for the Cross button button) will be used instead. (Tg)

When on and the sound is in Sound Effect mode, each row maps to an audio surface type. When powered with a Collision wire, the sound will use the audio surface type from the collision to decide which row to select a slice from.

When off, any slice from the slice mapper will be played.

# Multi-language

When on, each slice will have a language setting, used to play a suitable language slice for the player. (Tg)

If only one language is used by the slices this setting is ignored by the gadget so that something plays.

# Slice Keytracking

Available:

when in “Instrument” mode.

When on, each slice will have a note setting, used to select a suitable slice depending on which note needs to be played. (Tg)

# Sound Channel

When inside a parent that has a set channel, this gadget will use that channel for audio output.

When no parent gadget has a set channel, this gadget’s channel will be used for audio output. If this gadget’s channel is unset, it will use the General channel.

The used channel (unless defaulting to the General channel) will be lit in colour. If differe, the setting will be lit white.

General

The general audio channel.

Music

The music audio channel.

Voice

The voice audio channel.

Character

The character audio channel.

Background

The background audio channel.

Gameplay

The gameplay audio channel.

Unset

Default to the general channel.

# Metre Numerator, Metre Denominator

(See Timeline > Metre Numerator.)

When in a timeline, this is overridden by the timeline’s setting. (Tg)

Note, Metre Denominator does not have a “No Time Signature” option.

# Splitter

Contains the settings:

A splitter takes a fat wire and splits those into separate outputs to allow you to isolate specific values.

Note that a non-fat wire will be split into positive and negative, as a Signal wire type. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Input

Takes any kind of wire, and splits it into multiple wires. (Jj)

# Type

Sends a value based on the source of the input wire. See Wire Types for the ID of each type.

# Outputs

There can be multiple outputs depending on how many values the input wire holds. The number of outputs and what they represent is automatically detected. The icons for these outputs will be based on those output types also. (Jj)

For example, wiring up the output from a controller sensor’s left stick will give two outputs: “Left/Right” and “Up/Down.” (Jj)

If the wire carries a single signal, the splitter will split it into a positive and negative output instead. (Jj)

# Subtitle Displayer

Contains the tabs:

Displays text on the screen like subtitles. Similar to the text displayer.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.0155% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

If there is more than one line in the text of the displayer, handles appear along the top edge for the start and end of the first and second lines of text. Drag them with Cross button to set the times those lines will be shown.

# Text Properties

# Inputs & Outputs

# Start Text, Text Active

(See Dialogue Text Displayer > Inputs & Outputs.)

# Sun & Sky

Contains the tabs:

Changes the appearance of the sun and sky, as well as the angle and brightness of the sunlight.

Note that the sky is reflected by metallic finishes.

The sun casts light and affects areas of objects this light hits. The sky light affects areas unaffected by sunlight, such as shadows.

Note that the “rays” of light cast by the sun are parallel as if emitted from infinitely far away.

The sky itself is made up of flecks, just as all things are in dreams. If you want to hide those flecks you can turn the tint amount all the way up so that all the sky’s flecks are the same colour. (Tg) Or you can use the camera’s aperture settings to blur out the sky.

A completely custom sky can be created by making a sculpt that encompasses the entire scene (Tg) or using textboxes for a perfectly “flat” colour. (Tg)
Gizmo:

A sphere with the sky projected onto it. Drag with R2 or rotate with L2 to adjust the orientation of the Sky Image. (Tg)

A stalk comes out from the centre of the sky with a sphere attached representing the sun. Drag the stalk with R2 to adjust the sun’s position in the sky.

Drag the sphere to adjust the sun’s position in the sky. Its proximity to the sky sphere also represents its brightness. When its brightness is lower, it is darker in colour. Scale using Up button/Down button to adjust the visual size of the sun in the sky.

Amount powered affects:

The received power is used to weight the blend (averaging) with other sky gadgets. If fully powered, it will average evenly. If powered very little, it will not affect the sun & sky settings very much.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

# Sun Properties

# Sun Colour

Sets the colour of the sun and of the light the sun emits across the scene. (Tg)

Wire a value into the sun’s colour with “modulate” wire-blend mode to control the brightness of the light used to light the scene beyond the normal range.

# Sun Brightness

The intensity of the light emitted by the sun across the scene.

# Sun Size

The size of the sun in the sky, in degrees of the view taken up by it. (Tg)

# Sun Visible

When on, the sun is visible in the sky.

When off, the sun is not visible in the sky. Note, however, that the sun’s light is unaffected.

# Cast Shadows

When on, any objects that cast shadows will create shadows when hit by the sun’s light.

# Sun Shadow Scale vs Detail

When Cast Shadows is on, a “shadow map” is generated for an area around the player’s view. This map is always the same size but can be scaled to cover a different distance around the view. This setting scales that view around the player.

When the shadow map is scaled down, it’s covering a smaller area and so can give finer detail to the shadows produced in the scene. When the shadow map is scaled up, it’s covering a larger area so the shadows will appear softer and less defined.

Note at very high settings, the shadows are so diffuse that you can’t see them.

# Sky Properties

# Sky Image

When set to 0, a default sky image is used with a smooth blue gradient from one side of the globe to another.

When set to a particular sky image, that image will be used as a guide for the colours across the sky—though these colours are affected by the other settings below. (Tg)

# Sky Fleck Type

The fleck used to render the sky.

# Sky Brightness

Affects the intensity of the sky light within the scene.

Also affects the brightness of the sky image itself. For example, a lower brightness will make the sky image darker.

# Sky Saturation

Affects the saturation of the sky image. Lower means the colours of the sky image itself move towards grey.

# Sky Hue Cycle

Adjusts the colours of the sky image as a whole. (Tg)

# Sky Tint Colour

Sets the tint colour to be applied to the sky image. (Tg)

# Sky Tint Intensity

How strongly the tint is applied. Equivalent to a sculpt’s tint amount. (Tg)

# Horizon Definition

How dark the lower half of the sky appears. Lower values affect the rendered sky less. (Tg)

# Fleck Shade Randomness

When a fleck is added to the sky, its shade is randomised by this amount.

# Fog Range

The distance from the camera that “fog” begins to appear, relative to the player’s view.

Beyond this distance, objects are not rendered, saving rendering time. Objects clos enough to the distance will show the sky through them, imitating atmospheric distance fog.

The fully-visible distance and distance the sky begins to show through objects are pushed back further when this value is increased. (Tg)

Through testing, I have found the following rough guides:

  • At 1000m distance fog: ~50m fully visible. ~500m barely visible.
  • At 10,000m distance fog: ~120 fully visible. ~5000m barely visible.
  • At 50,000m distance fog: ~450m fully visible. (Could not find the “barely visible distance,” as objects cannot be put far away enough away.)

It also can be lit up by Light gadgets and Glow, just as the fog from a Fog Gadget would be. Higher ranges of fog lessens how dense the fog is nearer the player. (Tg)

# Switch

Contains the settings:

An on/off switch to be used with logic. Only visible in edit mode.

This gadget is larger and shows an interactive switch on the face, for use in edit mode. When off, the off icon is shown. When on, the on icon is shown.

If the gadget has a name too long to display across the top, the title will scroll left and right while hovering over it.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

Displays the full value the gadget would send while fully powered.

Tweak Menu

# Switch Colour

Dictates the colour of the gadget itself.

# On/Off

Sets the current state of the switch.

# Off Value

The value sent when the switch is off. Cannot be greater than the On Value.

# On Value

The value sent when the switch is on. Cannot be less than the Off Value.

# Switch Visible in Scene

When on, the interactive switch on the gadget will be shown. When off, the gadget will only show the current value being sent.

# Tag

Contains the settings:

Marks a named position, and orientation, and scale within the world. (Jj) (Tg)

While a trigger zone that is looking for the tag has its tweak menu open, flashes green.

Displays a bar on the gadget’s face that represents how “detected” it is by a Trigger Zone or Follower gadget.

Gizmo:

Marks the position, rotation, and scale of the tag within the scene. (Tg)

A common issue is when a tag has been added into the chip of a puppet and then everything is targeting in front of the feet of the puppet instead of their body of face. Moving the gizmo will fix that. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Tag Output

Note: detected by multiple—OR’d?

While detected by any powered trigger zone or follower gadget, sends a percentage signal based on how “detected” it is. (Jj) (Tg) (Tg) (See Trigger Zone > Detected#trigger-zone-detected.)

Can be used to produce the coordinates relative to trigger zones. (Tg) (Tg) Or the relative distance from some centre point to activate different effects depending on how close it is. (Tg)

# Scene Transform

Sends the current position, rotation, and scale of the gadget. (Tg)

Can be used to compare against other locations. (Tg)

# Teleporter

Contains the settings:

When turned on, moves the attached object to the position and/or orientation of a specified tag. (Jj)

This can be used to teleport an animating visual component to the position of an invisible controllable component for more control over the animations. (Tg)

Gizmo:

A location dot, with adjustable axis stalks. (Tg)

Amount powered affects:

The received power multiplies the percentage the affected objects will move towards their target position and orientation each frame.

Powering with 1 (“on”) will move the affected objects to the target position immediately. Powering with 0.5 will move the affected objects halfway to the target position each frame. (Tg) (Jj)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

Tweak Menu

# Tag Name

The tag location to teleport to. (Tg) (Jj)

Use the adjustment controls to cycle through names of tags in the scene and the names used by other gadgets looking for tag names.

# Match Target Position

When on, the affected object will change position to match the target tag’s position. (Jj)

# Match Target Orientation

When on, the affected object will rotate to match the target tag’s orientation. (Tg) (Jj)

# Scope

(See Trigger Zone > Detection Scope.)

# Teleporter Ordering

When multiple teleporters are active on the same frame, those with a higher value for this setting will be processed first.

Those with the same value will be processed in whatever order the engine chooses.

Useful when teleporting to an object that is teleporting to another object at the same time to prevent them mis-timing when they should move.

# Affected Object(s)

Dictates the objects to teleport. (Jj) (Tg) Even other objects entirely. (Tg)

# Text Displayer

Note: (not included, as it seems open to abuse and hidden my Mm) {\xABC0;} hidden emoji. Unicode? Hidden icons? {<}term{>} glowing gold text {<}/term{>} {<}clue{>} Mm-pink glowing text {<}/clue{>} {x3X} (X = is an cheratcter) bold text from then on {*} bold text {*} {#} heading to the end of the line (description/comment/title only)
Contains the tabs:

If the text has been set (even with no characters), displays text either on-screen or in the world. The text will be previewed while the gizmo is shown, or if set to In Scene.

There are three parts to a text box: the text, the box which serves as the background for the text, and the border which lines the outside of the box. Settings for one will not affect the other two.

The text gadget can be used in clever ways to add effects other than text to the game. Examples include shafts of light (Mm), water ripples (Mm), and glass (Tg).

If time is paused while a text gadget is powered, it will continue to render to the screen. (Tg)

Note that when text is close to the surface of a sculpt then the further you are away from it, the more transparent the text becomes. (Tg)
Gizmo:

A preview of the text box itself. When hovering over it, arrow handles are shown on the sides that can be manipulated (for example, if the text is aligned to the left there is no handle on the left side).

Hold R2 or primary T button to drag a handle.

The text box itself can be dragged using Right stick or primary T button. Note that precise move and grid snap affect this movement, but still work using the scene grid as normal. So when not looking dead-on to an axis of the current grid the text may not move in straight lines using this.

If the box has a “tail,” a location position can be moved with R2 or primary T button to move it to set where the tail points.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.0155% gameplay > things per object.

# Text in VR

When viewing text in VR that is in-scene, it will appear in the scene as normal.

When it is not in-scene however, it will appear to stick to a plane in front of the player’s view. The distance of the plane for a piece of text can be set, defining how far “forward” (according to the view orientation) the text should display.

This affects depth perception, but the text will be on top of the scene itself no matter what.

# Text Properties

# Text

The text to display. Click on it to bring up the text input interface. The text is shown on the gadget itself. (Jj)

Note that the text to be displayed cannot be changed in-game. Also, the text gadget will not render if there is no text to display. (Tg)

Dreams icons can be used in text gadgets by typing icon names between <<angle-brackets>>. You can see a guide of all available icons at TAPgiles.com/icons with searchable keywords and cross-references, or InDreams for a list with names.

Emoji can be used in text gadgets by typing Emoji One short codes between colons like this: :emoji_name:. You can see a list of all available emoji on emojipedia.org. So find the short code for a given emoji, click on the emoji and scroll down to Shortcodes.

# Text Colour

The colour of the text. (Jj) The gadget uses this colour also.

# Text Brightness

Higher values also cause the text itself to glow. Note that if the text is set to be too bright, it can become hard to read.

# Text Opacity

The opacity of the text. Lower is more transparent. The lowest will make the text disappear completely. (Jj) Note that this opacity does not affect the box or border.

This can be used to create transparent objects such as windows or the surface of water. (Tg)

# Font

The font of the text. (Jj) Shows the number of the font used.

# Text Box Properties

# Show Text Box

When on, the background text box will be shown. When off, it will be hidden. (Jj)

# Text Box Colour

The colour of the box. (Jj)

# Tail Shape

Chooses from a number of tail styles as if the box were a speech bubble. The tail comes from the bottom centre of the box. (Jj) The first option is “none,” which will not show a tail.

If there is a tail and the gadget is selected or its tweak menu is open, a location marker will appear below the text box representing the position the tail is pointing towards.

Note that the appearance of the tail (eg. colour) will be the same as the box itself. Also, the border wraps around the tail if there is one.

The tails are as follows:

None

Straight

Bubbles

Zigzag (pointing right)

Zigzag (pointing left)

Curved (pointing right)

Curved (pointing left)

# Text Box Brightness

The brightness of the box. (Jj) Higher values make the box glow.

# Text Box Opacity

How opaque (solid) the box is. Lower values make it more transparent.

# Text Box Curviness

How rounded the corners of the box are. (Jj)

The percentage value is used relative to the width and height of the box.

For example, if a box is wider than it is tall, the corner curves will be wider than they are tall.

# Circular Curviness

How circular the curviness is that is applied.

# Taper

The larger the value, the more the right side is rendered larger that the left side.

The smaller the value, the more the left side is rendered larger than the right side.

# Wonkiness

The wonkiness effect warps the text box and border, making it appear “wonky.” This sets how much that effect affects the rendering.

When a gadget is created the wonkiness effect is randomly seeded.

# Padding

How far beyond the normal edge the text box will be rendered.

# Autofit

When on, the box will automatically resize to fit the size of the text. The width set by the gizmo handles is for word-wrapping only.

When off, the box size can be changed independently of its contents with nodes along the sides of the box. (Jj)

# Texture Properties

Applies texture to the box and border in a number of ways. While not in None mode, also applies a fade to the edges of the box, and separately to the edges of the border.

# Texture Mode

The method of adding texture to the box and border.

None

No texture is applied.

Painterly

Individual flecks are rendered to make up the box and border. Disables shadows.

Standard

A background texture based on different flecks is added as an opacity mask to the box and border.

# Texture

Unavailable:

when in None mode.

When in Standard mode, selects from a number of textured backgrounds based on the fleck types. (Jj)

When in Painterly mode, selects from a number of flecks to use for rendering the box and border.

# Texture Strength

Unavailable:

when in None mode.

How much the texture affects the box colour.

When in Standard mode, affects how apparent the texture is within the fade.

When in Painterly mode, affects how much detail you can see in each fleck making them more transparent. A lower strength makes the result less “textured” and more solid.

# Texture Scale

Unavailable:

when in None mode.

How large the texture is or flecks are.

# Fade Amount

Available:

when in Standard mode.

How far in from the outer edge the box and border starts to fade out.

# Painterly Fade

Available:

when in Painterly mode.

How far beyond the left and right edges of the original box flecks will be randomly added.

# Border Properties

# Show Border

When on, the border is shown. When off, the border is not shown.

# Border Colour

Dictates the colour of the border.

# Border Brightness

How bright the border is. Higher brightness causes the border to seem to glow.

# Border Opacity

How opaque the border is. Lower values make the border more transparent.

# Border Width

How thick the border is.

# Shadow Properties

A shadow shown behind whatever is rendered by the text, box, tail, and border.

# Show Shadow

When on, a shadow of the border is shown behind the box. It also enables further settings.

# Shadow Softness

Available:

when the shadow is on.

Softness is a fall-off gradient making the shadow more and more transparent at the edges. The softness dictates how far from the edge that fall-off reaches.

# Shadow Opacity

Available:

when the shadow is on.

How opaque the shadow is.

# Shadow Angle

Available:

when the shadow is on.

The shadow is shown a certain distance away from the centre of the box, along the specified angle.

For example, 90° would make the shadow peek out to the right of the box, and 0° would make the shadow peek out to the top of the box.

# Alignment

# Horizontal Alignment

The horizontal alignment of the text within the box, and the horizontal position within the box that will be used as its base position.

Left

will use the left edge of the box, and hide the left size handle.

Centre

will use the centre of the box, and show size handles on both sides.

Right

will use the right edge of the box, and hide the right size handle.

# Vertical Alignment

The vertical alignment of the text within the box, and the vertical position within the box that will be used as its base position.

Good for animating the size of a box from one side. For example, to make a progress bar. (Tg)

Top

will use the top edge of the box, and hide the top size handle.

Middle

will use the middle of the box, and will show size handles on both sides.

Bottom

will use the bottom edge of the box, and hide the bottom size handle.

# Horizontal Alignment (Screen)

Unavailable:

when in-scene.

Dictates the position on the screen the entire box will be displayed at. (Jj) Non-custom settings leave a margin at the edge of the screen.

Left

Positions the text box such that its left edge is to the left of the screen.

Centre

Positions the text box so that there is an equal amount of space to the left and right.

Right

Positions the text box so that its right edge is to the right of the screen.

Custom

Allows the box to be dragged horizontally to any position on the screen.

# Vertical Alignment (Screen)

Unavailable:

when in-scene.

Dictates the position on the screen the entire box will be displayed at. (Jj) Non-custom settings leave a margin at the edge of the screen.

Top

Positions the text box such that its top edge is to the top of the screen.

Middle

Positions the text box so that there is an equal amount of space above and below.

Bottom

Positions the text box so that its bottom edge is to the bottom of the screen.

Custom

Allows the box to be dragged vertically to any position on the screen.

# Settings

# In Scene

When on, the text will be displayed at some 3D position and rotation within the scene. (Jj) (Mm)

When off, the text will be displayed directly to the screen, on top of anything within the scene.

# VR Text Distance

Unavailable:

when In-Scene.

The depth of the plane this text will be displayed on. (See Text in VR.)

# Big Gadget

When on, the gadget will display larger than normal in edit mode, and show the text on the gadget’s face.

# Face Camera

Available:

when “in-scene.”

When on, the text will always be displayed straight-on to the camera, even when changing the angle the camera is looking at the text from. Effectively, this means the text will only have scale and rotation, but no 3D perspective. (Jj)

# Always On Top

Available:

when “in-scene.”

When on, the text will not be obscured by anything else within the scene, apart from other always-on-top text objects. When off, the text can be covered by objects within the scene. (Jj)

# Layer Order

Unavailable:

when In Scene is on.

All text objects on a higher layer number will be displayed above all text objects on higher layer numbers.

Note that text objects on the same layer will be displayed in the order they were created or.

# Allow Rotation

When off, text will always display upright. If in-scene, “upright” relative to the gadget.

When on, text may be rotated. When Face Camera is on, the text will always display flat to the screen, but will use the Z axis rotation as if it were rotated in 2D.

# Animation Speed

How many characters are typed per second when the gadget receives power.

While typing, text is wrapped at the point that the next character would push the word beyond the size of the containing box.

# Inputs & Outputs

# Start Text, Text Active, Text Animation Finished, Text Animating, Text Animation Progress

(See Dialogue Text Displayer > Inputs & Outputs.)

# Timer

Contains the settings:

Counts time to a target duration. (Jj) (Tg) The timer is considered “finished” when the current time is the same as the target time.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Target Time

The duration the timer will run for.

# Current Time

The current time of the timer. Maximum is the target time.

# Timer Type

The type dictates how it reacts to the start signal, and how it views the progress of the timer in relation to the target time.

Count Up:

will begin adding to the current time until it hits the target. Note that the timer will continue running even when not receiving a signal into “Start Timer.” (Tg)

Speed:

will add time multiplied by the signal received by “Start Timer.” For example, while 0.5 is sent to “Start Timer,” 0.5 seconds to be added to the current time for each realtime second that passes. (Tg)

Can be used to charge up some effect over time. (Tg)

Positional:

will run time forwards or backwards until the current time is the percentage of the target time as received by “Start Timer.” The time set will be the target time multiplied by the input signal. (Tg)

For example, sending 0.2 when the target time is 10 seconds will move the current time to 2 seconds.

Good for animating as normal to a set point in a timeline. (Tg)

Count Down:

will begin at the set target time and count down to zero, at which point it will be considered finished. (Tg)

# Start Timer

Starts time running for the timer, though how the behaviour of the timer is affected by the value sent into this setting differs depending on which Timer Type is being used. (Tg)

A switch can be used to send different values for if a signal is “on” of “off” by converting it into different speeds or positions and wiring the result into the Start Time input. (Tg)

# Timer Finished (Pulse)

Note: when the current time stops?

Sends an “on” pulse the moment when the current time stops changing unless in Speed mode. (Pk) (Tg)

# Reset Timer

Sets the current time based on which type the timer is set to use. If set to “count up,” “speed,” or “positional,” it will reset to 0. If set to “count down,” it will reset to the target time. (Tg)

If you wire the “finished” pulse output to the “reset” input, the timer will loop and send a “finished” pulse at the interval set as the target time. (Jj) (Tg)

# Timer Output

Gives a 0 - 1 (percentage) representation of the progress the timer has made towards the target time target. Think of it as a “progress” signal. (Pk) (Tg)

For example, a “count up” timer with a target of 10 seconds is at 3 seconds. It will give a signal of 0.3. Works the same for a “count down” timer. But with the same settings, this would give a signal of 0.7. (Jj)
A good use for this is to set a Timeline’s playhead position through the timeline. (Tg)

# Timer Finished (Signal)

Note: This technically correct?

Sends a signal while the current time is the same as the target time. (Pk) (Tg)

# Timeline

Note: S letter for solo icon
Contains the tabs:

Any gadgets within a timeline will be activated and deactivated (turned on or off) at the right times depending on where they are located within the timeline. Placing a gadget more to the left of the timeline will activate it earlier, and placing it more to the right of the timeline will activate it later. (Tg)

Note, specifically gadgets to the immediate right of the playhead will be powered. (Tg)

Because of this, logic can be run at a specific point in a timeline or even on a loop. (Tg) It also makes programming anything in an order, or anything with precision timing very easy to make and adjust. (Tg) (Tg)

Logic can even ensure that a timeline was turned on before a certain time and enable later logic to active when the time comes, for example to play a lead-in piece of music before changing to a new section of the song. (Tg) Or to turn off a part of the song so that it doesn’t play when it loops back around. (Tg) Or even affect what is played at certain times. (Tg)

You can move, clone, delete, select, etc. gadgets within the timeline as you would in the scene. You can also drag from the left or right edge of the gadget to adjust when they start or stop being activated within the timeline. Note that some sound gadgets limit this depending on their contents and settings.

The time mode can use musical measures and BPM, with features to help snap clips to these measures. Or it can use normal time. To cycle between these modes, click on the measures or time display in the top-right of the window. (Mm)

Gadgets placed in a timeline will be powered on at the right time and powered off at the right time.

You can use a keyframe within a timeline to affect the timeline itself (Tg) or sounds/instruments on the timeline. (Tg) Timeline settings can be changed as it is playing using various kinds of logic.

The playhead shows which part of the timeline is currently being played. While time is running, you can use Cross button to drag it to a new position or click on the head of the timeline (showing the time or bar numbers) to snap the playhead to that position.

You can record a Keyframe to set the playhead’s position, but need to use shift +Cross button to record the playhead’s position. (Tg) (Tg) This can be used with a “keep changes” keyframe to set the position and then allow it to play as normal. (Tg)

Amount powered affects:

The power received will multiply the power of all contained gadgets. (Tg) This can be used to blend between 2 animation timelines. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006533333333333334% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

Playback speed is multiplied by the parent timeline’s playback speed. The playhead position is inhereted from the parent timeline.

If holding shift while dragging one end of the timeline it can be stretched, and the playback speed will be adjusted so that the contents scale with the new duration.

# Window Buttons

The timeline has a number of special buttons across the top-left of its window:

Metronome

While the timeline plays in edit mode, a metronome will sound based on the timeline’s Metre Numerator and Metre Denominator. A higher sound will play on the first beat of every bar.

Count-In

When recording into an instrument within this timeline, 1 bar will be used to count the creator in before the timeline begins playing. Numbers will show in the centre of the screen counting them in before the timeline will begin to progress.

Solo

When playing time, only this timeline will play even if unpowered. When it gets to the end, the timeline will restart automatically. Useful for testing animations, etc.

Timeline Snap

When off, objects and the window edge will move freely. When on and in realtime mode, they snap to the columns shown. Or when using beats mode, things will snap to the bars when further away and beats when closer. (Holding L1 will temporarily invert this setting.)

# Fader Handles

When some gadgets are placed on a timeline, they have fader handles on the top left and top right of the gadget itself. Drag these with R2 or primary T button to add a ramp to the power, locked to the position of the playhead. This means if the timeline is paused midway through one of these ramps, the power of that gadget will remain as it is.

# Time Type

The current time the playhead is at in the timeline is displayed in the top-right of the window. Click it with Cross button to toggle between “realtime” and “beats” modes. (Tg)

Realtime shows the hours, minutes, and seconds passed in the timeline, and shows the times across the columns. The playhead can be dragged to any point in the timeline smoothly.

When the timeline is created from Assembly Mode, it will start in “realtime” mode. When the timeline is created from Sound Mode, it will start in “beats” mode.

Note, when inside another timeline, the time type and meter will be inherited from a parent timeline.

# Scale the View

Hold shift +Left button or Right button when using a Dualshock 4 to scale the view of the timeline horizontally, time-wise.

When using the moves, hover over the timeline with the primary imp, hold secondary circle and twist.

This means a second will be a lot wider and more precise timing adjustments can be made. (Tg)

Scaling up enough will show 30 columns per second. When the timeline is at 100% playback speed this matched up perfectly with the 30 logic frames per second the engine uses. Frame numbers will be displayed across the top of the timeline, in place of the bar numbers or time.

# Previewing

Hover over the timeline and preview controls will appear below the window. (Tg) These include “play/pause” and “rewind.”

This previews this timeline only, and no interactions with any other part of the scene such as physics, or keyframes outside of the timeline. For this reason, it’s good to remember to also test with time running to see how the full engine will affect playback of the timeline.

# Trim Handles

Note: When using beyond the trim end area, what happens? When the trim handles leave 0 space for the timeline how does that affect playback? What if the timeline itself is 0 width?

Hover over the playhead row to see “trim start” and “trim end” handles. Drag them with Cross button to adjust their position. (Tg)

The trim start and end are relative to the start and end of the timeline respectively. This means that adjusting the start or end of the timeline itself will affect the trim start and end.

The trim start and end will be considered the start and end of the timeline for all purposes apart from placement of gadgets within the timeline.

Shortcut: When using the DS controller, hover over the playhead row and click L3 to set the “trim start” to that position, or R3 to set the “trim end.”

# Playback Properties

# Timeline Colour

The colour of the gadget.

# Playback Speed

How fast the timeline plays at. Shows a beats per minute display in a tooltip as you edit the setting.

At 100% playback speed, there are 2 beats per second.

When nested inside a parent timeline, the resulting speed of playback will be multiplied by its parent’s speed. By stretching inside a timeline up to 1600% playback speed can be set.

# Playback Mode

(See Action Recorder > Playback Mode.)

Defaults to Sustain mode.

Does not have Ping-Pong mode.

Using Loop mode allows you to have a perfectly looping timeline even when using the trim handles to chop up the animation in any way. Such a timeline can be offset relative to the trim handles to make timing similar loops together very easy. (Tg)

# Restart Timeline

When sent a signal, the playhead will move to the start of the timeline. This will trigger even if the timeline is unpowered.

# On End Trigger

Sends a pulse when the end of the timeline is reached. (Tg)

# Playhead Position

Note: Does the wired playhead lag, or the output from the other gadget lag?

Sends the percentage of progress through the playable area (including trim) that the playhead currently is at.

To set the playhead’s position by wire, while the timeline is open wire the value into the bottom of the playhead line. A received 0 will set the playehad to the start, a 1 will set the playhead to the end. (Tg) (Tg) This can be used to sync one timeline’s playhead to another timeline’s playhead. (Tg)

This can be used to have fine control over the mapping from a percentage value into some new value. (Tg) Or give different potential results with weighted probabilities. (Tg) Even to produce results when two coordinates are within particular ranges. (Tg) Or anything in which things happening in order when triggered would be needed. (Tg)
Note that at the start of the scene, the playhead will be at 0% through the timeline for at least 1 frame before the incoming wire input is used. If there is logic at the start of the timeline you do not want to activate at this time, use a second timeline to leave that logic off for 1 frame until the playhead adjusts correctly. (Tg)

# Ignore Frame Rate

When on, the logic engine will not slow down the playing of the timeline. Good for making sure music doesn’t slow down if the framerate slows down.

# Beat & Sidebar

# Metre Numerator

How many beats (as defined by the meter denominator) are in a bar. (Tg)

# Metre Denominator

Assuming a four-beat bar, the fraction of a beat each beat column lasts. (Tg)

Quarter Note

Each column is 1 beat long.

Eighth Note

Each column is half a beat long.

Sixteenth Note

Each column is a quarter beat long.

No Time Signature

Each column is 1 beat long, though the beat is not carried through to contained gadgets.

# Show Sidebar

When on, the sidebar is shown. (Tg) This has two buttons for each row of the timeline: “Mute Row” and “Solo.”

Mute Row controls the power of all gadgets on a row. If there are any rows with Solo enabled, all rows that do not have solo enabled will be turned off.

Use Triangle button on a mute button to unmute all rows. The same works for solo’d rows.

# Volume & Channel

# Volume

Adjusts the volume of autio output from this gadget. (Tg)

Audio sources within this gadget have their audio output multiplied by the parent volume. Top-level gadgets have their output volume multiplied by the volume of the channel they are using.

The setting is added to 100% for calculations. So +10% would give a final volume for that gadget of 110% of normal.

The output volume from the parent gadget is shown at the bottom of the tab, rounded.

For example: we have a Timeline A, containing Timeline B, containing Sound Gadget C. A is set to 30% giving 130% volume. B is set to -40% giving 60% volume, but this is multiplied by the 110% of the parent timeline, giving a final value of 78%. C is set to 80%, which is multiplied by the 78% giving a final value of 62%.

# Sound Channel

(See Sound Gadget > Sound Channel.)

# Trigger Zone

Contains the tabs:

Detects if an object of some kind is within the defined zone. (Mm) For example, detecting if a tag gadget is within the zone. (Jj)

Has a location node associated with it that marks the position of the trigger zone within the scene. Note that this doesn’t do anything if using the “scene” as the zone to detect in.

While the gadget is selected or its tweak menu is open, the zone will be displayed in the scene. While it’s displayed, you can adjust its size by hovering over a side to see an arrow pointing away from the shape in the direction you can pull it. Drag it to adjust that side. (Jj) (Mm)

Can also have a falloff, to measure how close a detected object is to the core zone. This falloff is measured from the edge of the core shape and beyond. You can adjust this by hovering over a side of the zone and holding shift while dragging it out.

While the tweak menu is open, any object in the scene that can be detected will pulse green.

There is a performance limit on how many zones can be active at once, including zones from other kinds of gadgets. (Tg)

Gizmo:

A location marker, and a zone visualisation. The zone must contain the location point and some shapes require it to be the centre. Drag the outer edge of the zone with R2 or primary trigger. Drag the falloff with shift +R2 or primary trigger.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006533333333333334% gameplay > things per object. 255 active zones looking for shapes (sculpts, groups) can function at once. There is no detectable limit for how many zones can look for points (tags, camera, imps) at once.

# Important Properties

# Things to Detect

Defines what kind of object the gadget tries to detect. Note that if an object is within the trigger zone but powered off, it will not be detected.

Possessed Controller Sensors (Looks for a shape):

will look for objects that a controller sensor is attached (surface-snapped) to that is currently possessed by a player.

Tag (Looks for a point):

will look for a named Tag. (Cc) (Tg)

Tags that can be detected—as allowed by the mode, name, and detection scope—will flash while the trigger zone is selected or its tweak menu is open. This happens whether they are currently detected by the trigger zone or not. (Cc)

Imp (Looks for a point):

will look for an imp. (Cc)

Camera (Looks for a point):

will detect if the player’s current view originates within the specified zone. (Cc)

Element (Looks for a shape):

will look for any instance of a specified Dreamiverse element. (Cc)

Labels (Looks for a shape):

will look for elements with the labels defined in the labels tab. (Cc) (Tg)

This mode can be used to detect arbitrary shapes created by sculpts. (Tg)

Note that group labels and detection is separate from their contents. Meaning, a group can be detected but its contents may not be detected.

Scene Element (Looks for a shape):

will look for a specific instance of an object within the scene.

Possessable Controller Sensors (Looks for a shape):

Looks for any object that has an attached possessable controller sensor; possessed or not.

All Controller Sensors (Looks for a shape):

Looks for any object that has an attached controller sensor.

# Name to Detect

Note: Check modes and behaviours.
Unavailable:

when looking for the Imp, Camera, or a Dreamiverse Element.

Used to name the tag, scene element, or labelled element being looked for. (Cc) Can use the adjustment controls to cycle through the names of existing scene elements and tags, and names other gadgets within the scene are looking for.

If a name is specified in the “Name to Detect” setting, only detects objects that also have that name. Because of this, you can use this mode and allow all labels, and just use the name feature.

This works with several detection modes:

  • “Tag” will look for tags that have the required name. If no name is specificed, will match only tags with no name set. (Cc)
  • “Scene Element” will look for elements that have the required name. If no name is specified, will match only elements with no name set. (Cc)
  • “Labels” will look for objects in the scene-level only that have the required name. If no name is specified, will match any object with the correct label at scene-level or within groups. (Cu)

# Detection Scope

Available:

when looking for tags.

Dictates where the target must be located as it related to the trigger zone gadget’s location. (For the definition of what “Here” means for this setting, see Scoped Targetting.) (Cc)

Everywhere

will detect if the target whether it is “here” or not.

Here

will detect only if the target is “here.” (Cc)

Not here

will detect only if the target is not “here.” (Cc)

# Number to Detect

The minimum number of targets required to be considered “detected.” More targets may be present. (Cc)

Also dictates the maximum number that will be sent by the “number detected” output.

Turning the slider down beyond 1 will change this setting to “all.” With this, all possible targets existing within the level must be within range to be considered “detected.” (Cc)

# Number Detected

Outputs the number of detected targets, to a maximum of the “number to detect.” (Cc) (Tg)

# Dreamiverse Element to Detect

This is an attachment input to link to an element within the scene. Only available when looking for an “element.”

Lets you search for a specific element locally or in the Dreamiverse. The trigger zone will look for that element. (Cc)

# Scene Element to Detect

Available:

when detecting a “scene element.”

Links to any number of specific sculpts or groups within the scene to be detected by the trigger zone.

# Detected

Sends a 0 - 1 signal based on the target’s position within the defined zone. (See Zone Size.)

# Consider Players

Note: test 2 player for detected object outputs

When on, the Detected output will send detection signals for each player or non-player separately depending on which player owns the object being detected. If the trigger zone gadget is inside an object owned by a player, detected objects will output separate detection signals depending on which players own trigger zones that are detecting it.

When detecting Possessed Controller Sensors, Imps, Posessable Controller Sensors, and All Controller Sensors, outputs will always consider players, and this switch is disabled.

When detecting the Camera, outputs never consider players and this switch is disabled.

# Zone Size

You can use things like fall off to make it seem like the sound is at a certain position within the scene relative to a particular point. (Tg)

The shape of the zone within the scene that the gadget can detect targets within (Jj), including the entire scene.

# Zone Shape

The shape of the zone. Stretchable by hovering over the shape and dragging with R2, just as in sculpt mode.

Sphere

A sphere shape. May not be stretched non-uniformly. As such, it has one dimension: the radius of the sphere.

Cube

A box shape.

Cylinder

A cylinder shape.

Cone

A cone shape. Increasing the Z fall-off will extend beyond the circular base, maintaining the same angles for the sides of the fall-off cone.

Ellipsoid

A sphere that can be stretched non-uniformly.

Scene

Includes the entire scene.

# Zone Size

The dimensions of the core of the zone. Signals pertaining to something within the core will be full signals. (Tg)

# Zone Falloff

The dimensions of the falloff of the zone. Signals pertaining to something within the falloff will be attenuated. The signals are multiplied by a percentage based on how far from the outer edge of the falloff towards the core the signal is coming from.

For example, while a tag is closer to the edge of the falloff, the detected signal will be closer to 0%. Halfway between the outer edge and the core, the detected signal will be at 50%. As it gets closer to the core and further from the outer edge of the falloff, it will be closer to 100%. (Tg)

# Labels

Defines settings relating to how labels are detected by the trigger zone. (Cc) Also contains settings for the target object’s visibility and collision. Note that groups can also have labels associated with them.

# Detection Mode: Visibility

Unavailable:

when the trigger zone is looking for tags, imps, or the camera.

The visibility of an object required if it is to be detected. (Cc)

Visible

detects objects only if they are visible.

Hidden

detects objects only if they are not visible.

Both

detects objects whether they are visible or not.

# Detection Mode: Collision

Whether an object must have collision turned on or not for it to be detected.

Collidable

detects objects only if they are collidable.

Non-Collidable

detects object only if they are not collidable.

Both

detects object whether than are collidable or not.

# Detect Labels: Match Mode

Only affects behaviour while in Labels mode.

Any Selected

will detect any object with at least one of the selected labels. (Cc) (Cc)

All Selected

will detect any object with all selected labels. (Cc)

# Labels

There are 9 input switches, one for each label. (Cc)

“Unlabelled” will match any object that has no labels at all.

(See Labels.)

# Value Slider

Contains the settings:

This outputs a specific value signal that has been set. Also provides a UI to easily adjust this value while the game is running in edit mode without opening the tweak menu. (Jj) Note that this gadget will never be seen by the player, even when its UI is set to visible.

These are particularly useful for seeing the output of a signal in realtime when debugging things (Jj), or to easily configure more complex aspects of logic.

When holding a wire connected to an output and hovering over the gadget, an input port for the value will appear.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

Displays the full value the gadget would send while fully powered.

Tweak Menu

# Value Slider Colour

The colour of the gadget. (Tg)

# Value

The current value to be sent. (Jj) If set to below the minimum value, will reset to the minimum value. If set to below the minimum value or above the maximum value, will reset to within the accepted limits.

Changing this will update the UI on the face of the gadget, and changing the UI on the face of the gadget will update this value.

When wiring into this setting, the modulate blend mode cannot be used.

# Minimum Value

The minimum value of the slider.

# Maximum Value

The maximum value of the slider.

# Slider Visible In Scene

When on, the UI on the face of the gadget will be shown. When off, the UI on the face of the gadget will not be shown. Instead, the gadget will simply show the current value being sent.

# Variable

Contains the settings:

A variable gadget defines a variable. The name of the variable is defined by the name of the gadget. These names are case sensitive (eg. “P1” is a different variable to “p1”). (Jj) (Tg) These values can be stored between scenes and between playthroughs of the Dream the scene is in.

Persistent variables can be used to store and restore the state of gadgets between sessions or scenes. (Tg) They can even be used to detect if the player is coming back to a dream or if they are coming to it for the first time, and change behaviours depending. (Tg)
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object. 128 persistent variables per dream, no limit for non-persistent variables.

Tweak Menu

# Initial Value

The variable will have this value when the game is first loaded. (Tg) If this variable persists in the Dream and its value has been stored as something else, the gadget will have that value instead.

Cannot go below the Minimum Value or above the Maximum Value.

# Minimum Value

The lowest value the variable can have. (Tg)

Can go up to a maximum of the initial value.

# Maximum Value

The highest value the variable can have. (Tg)

# Multiplayer

When on, each player will have their own value stored within the same variable that can be modified separately. (Jj) (Tg)

# Persist In Dream

When on, the variable’s value will be stored when the player leaves the scene. If the Restore on Rewind setting is off, the value is also stored when the player rewinds the scene or the scene is reset.

Note, there is a limit of how many persistent variables can be stored for a single dream.

When a scene loads that contains a variable gadget with the same name and “Persist in Dream” turned on, the stored value will be retrieved. (Tg) Using this, you can transfer data between scenes and play sessions. (Jj) (Tg)

These values are shared across dreams contained inside a parent dream, unless the “Dream within a Dream” setting is turned on for the sub-dream.

Note, it is not required to have a variable in a scene if it is not being used. (Tg)

# Force Reset

When on, at the start of the scene the stored value is reset to the initial value. Note this happens even if the variable gadget is unpowered. (Tg)

# Restore Value on Rewind

Dictates how the variable’s value is handled when the player rewinds the scene or the scene is reset using the global settings gadget.

When on, the value will be reset to the initial value. When off, the value will be retained. (Tg)

# Current Value

Sends the current value of the variable. (Tg)

# Value Increased

Note: wire type

Pulses when the variable’s value is increased by a variable modifier gadget. (Tg)

# Value Decreased

Note: wire type

Pulses when the variable’s value is decreased by a variable modifier gadget. (Tg)

# Variable Modifier

Contains the settings:

A variable modifier gadget changes the value of the variable indicated by its name. (Tg) Note that there must be an existing variable gadget with that name in the scene, to be able to set its value. (Tg)

Using modifiers you a simple stats system that drains and replenishes in different ways can be created. (Tg) Or a menu that saves your settings for the game. (Tg)

When the associated variable has Multiplayer enabled, if a variable modifier is powered by a Player Info wire only the players with a signal going through that wire will have their value modified.

For example, wiring a controller sensor button (which uses a Player Info wire output) into the power of a variable modifier will have that modification only happen for the player who pressed that button.
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Variable Name

You can adjust the value of this field to cycle through the names of all variable gadgets within the scene and all variable modifier “variable name” values within the scene. (Tg)

Dictates which variable will be modified by this gadget. (Jj)

# Operation Type

Dictates how the variable’s value will be modified by the gadget. (Jj)

Set

The associated variable will have its value set to the Operation Value. (Tg)

Get

The associated variable’s value won’t be changed, but this will get the current value and send it from the Variable Value output.

Add

The associated variable’s value will be changed by the amount specified by the Operation Value. (Tg)

Note that you can add a negative value to subtract from the variable’s current value.

The Add operation happens after the Reset operation, each frame. (Tg)

Reset

The associated variable’s value will be reset to its initial value. (Tg)

# Update Type

Dictates when the variable’s value will be modified. (Jj)

When Powered On:

The associated variable will be modified once, when the power of the gadget goes from non-positive to positive (eg. off to on). (Tg)

Continuously While Powered:

The modification will occur every logic-frame (30 times per second) while the gadget is powered. (Tg)

This is good for a value slowly creeping up or some resource draining over time. (Tg)

# Scope

(See Trigger Zone > Detection Scope.)

Note that to determine what modifiers are “Here,” the seeking gadget is the Variable, not the Variable Modifier that has this setting.

# Operation Value

Unavailable:

when in “Get” or “Reset” mode.

The value used to modify the variable, as defined by the operation type.

When the variable has “multiplayer” turned on and a Player Info wire is setting this value, connected players’ variables will be indpenedently modified according to the values in the wire.

# Variable Value

Available:

when in “Get” mode.

Outputs the variable’s current value. (Jj)

# Wiper

Contains the settings:

Displays different wipe effects.

When powered, transitions to the set Wipe Amount over the Fade-In Time. Then when unpowered, transitions to 0 wipe over the Fade-Out Time. (Tg)

Can transition into a colour, and out to the new view. Or freeze the current view and transition out directly to the new view.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Wipe Style

The graphical style of the wipe itself. (Jj)

When using VR, linear/positional wipes will be relative to what the player sees, not within the scene. For example, a linear wipe left to right will always be seen as left-to-right for VR players regardless of how their headset is positioned.

Bokeh

A screen wipe.

Colours from the current view are used to create circles of light that move toward the camera while fading out. When the new view is loaded, colours from that view are used to create circles instead. Screen.

While pushing on the sticks, the bokeh moves in response similar to the controls when rotating an object.

Dissolve

A screen wipe.

Fades to the colour or new view.

Linear

A linear wipe.

Shows an opaque box moving over the current view in a straight line, and then move out in the same direction to reveal the new view.

Circle

A positional wipe.

An opaque circle appears over the current view, and expands to cover it. Then to transition out, a cutout of a circle is made which expands out to reveal the new view.

Star

A positional wipe.

Similar to the circle wipe, in the shape of a star.

Heart

A positional wipe.

Similar to the circle wipe, in the shape of a heart.

Wibble

A screen wipe.

The view deforms as if underwater. When playing in VR, Dissolve will be used instead.

# Transition via Colour

When on, the wipe will transition to a colour, and then transition out of the colour to the next view.

When off, the wipe will freeze the view and transition to the new view.

# Wipe Colour

The colour the wipe will transition to. (Jj)

# Glow

Available:

when via-colour is on.

Makes the transition colour glow a lighter colour. Affects the bloom and lens flare of the player’s view.

# Reverse Fade-In

Unavailable:

when using a screen wipe style or when via-colour is off.

When on, a positional or directional wipe will play the fade-in transition in reverse.

# Reverse Fade-Out

Unavailable:

when using a screen wipe style.

When on, a positional or directional wipe will play the fade-out transition in reverse.

# Softness

Unavailable:

when using screen wipes.

Blurs the edge of the wipe. (Jj)

# Position/Direction

For positional wipes, dictates the centre of the circle relative to the screen. (Jj)

Note that this setting is overridden if there is a target set.

For linear wipes, this is used as the direction the wipe will move in.

# Track Object

The direction will be set dynamically to follow the linked object. (Jj)

# Fade-In Time

Unavailable:

when not using a screen wipe style or when via-colour is off.

How long it takes to transition to the wipe amount from the moment the wipe starts. (Jj)

Note that the “ramp in” slider applies while turning on the wipe, obscuring the current view.

# Fade-Out Time

How long it takes to transition out of a wipe from after the wipe is deactivated. (Jj)

And the “ramp out” slider applies while turning off the wipe, revealing the new view.

# Wipe Amount

How far through the transition the wiper currently is.

The target transition amount. When less than 100%, non-via-colour wipes will not function, and wipe styles with direction (eg. linear wipe) will not be able to continue in the same direction (eg. transition in moving right, transition out moving right).

The wiper’s timing can be directly controlled by setting Fade-In and Out times to 0, and animating this setting. (Tg)

# Transition Done

Sends a signal while the wipe is at full transition.

If “via colour” is on, this is when the screen is fully opaque. Else, it is the moment the wiper is turned on and the screen capture is taken and lasts for 1 frame like a pulse.

# Wireless Receiver

Contains the tabs:

Receivers communicate with transmitters with the same name as the specified channel that are in range.

Note: if no name is specified, all transmitters will be communicated with.
Gizmo:

the area the receiver is active in; works like a trigger zone’s gizmo.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.0067857142857142855% gameplay > things per object.

# Wireless Receiver Properties & I/O

# Channel

Dictates which transmitters can communicate with the receiver. (Jj)

# Signal from Transmitter

The values from all transmitters in communication with this gadget are combined and then output.

Whether a transmitter can communicate with a receiver depends on its “Scope” setting, as follows:

  • Scope is set to “Everywhere.”
  • Scope is set to “Here” and is within this Receiver’s targetting scope.
  • Scope is set to “Not Here” and is not within this Recevier’s targetting scope.

If Channel#wifi-receiver-channel is not set, transmitters of any name can communicate. If Channel is set, the transmitter’s name must be identical to the channel (this is case-sensitive).

Each transmitter’s value is multiplied by the falloff value, depending on how close to the core the transmitter gadget is.

Thin wire values (Boolean, Number, Signal) are OR’d together, using the value furthest from 0.

Fat wire values are blended, averaging all values.

The thin wire result and the fat wire result are then multiplied together and output.

# Signal to Transmitter

Broadcasts any signal it receives to transmitters within the specified zone. (Jj)

# Wireless Receiver Zone Size

Defines the shape and size of the receiver’s range, including a fall-off that attenuates the received signal. (Tg)

# Wireless Transmitter

Contains the settings:

Transmitters communicate with receivers that are set to a channel of the same name while in their zone. (Jj)

The position of the transmitter is the front-centre of the gadget face. Or when in a microchip, the front-centre of the chip’s gadget. (Tg)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006533333333333334% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# Signal from Receiver

Note: Does Are they blended if they are fat wires? [Tg|https://youtu.be/s9acmTFOU6M?t=473]

The values from all receivers in communication with this gadget are combined and output. (Jj)

The value outputted ignores the falloffs; it will always be at full strength. (Cc)

The OR is found for all incoming values, finding the value furthest from 0. When there is a tie between values, the receiver created first takes priority.

Thin wire values (Boolean, Number, Signal) are OR’d together.

Fat wire values are OR’d together.

For example, a 2 Numbers value (0.5, 1) OR’d with the 2 Numbers value (0.6, 0.7) will OR 0.5 with 0.6 to get 0.6, and 1 with 0.7 to get 1. So the result from this step would be (0.6, 1).

Then the fat wire result is OR’d with the thin wire result. Each value in the fat wire value is individually OR’d with the thin wire value.

For example, the fat wire (0.6, 1) OR’d with the thin wire (0.8) will OR each value. So the result would be (0.8, 1).

This result is then output.

# Signal to Receiver

The received signal will be broadcast to any corresponding receivers whose zone includes the transmitter gadget’s position.

# Scope

(See Trigger Zone > Detection Scope.)

Note that to determine what transmitters are “Here,” the seeking gadget is the Wireless Receiver, not the Wireless Transmitter that has this setting. (See Signal from Transmitter.)

# Speaker

Contains the tabs:

Channels sound gadget output through one place, and so is able to affect all audio channeled through it.

Most often used to have many sources output from the same 3D position, or to get the envelope (realtime volume of audio output) of a music track.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Properties

# Volume

The volume of the speaker.

Note, the final output volume is multiplied by channel settings.

# Delay

Adds a delay effect to all audio passing through this gadget.

# Reverb

Adds a reverb effect to all audio passing through this gadget.

# No. of Sounds

The number of linked sound gadgets that can play notes. Older sound gadgets take priority.

# Panning

# Envelope

Sends the highest envelope value out of all sounds playing through this speaker.

# Surround Pan, Stereo Width, Rear Speakers Volume, Pan Style

(See Sound Gadget > Panning.)

# 3D Panning

# Reverb

Contains the tabs:

There are four versions of this gadget, one for each of the four reverb channels: Reverb A (Music 1), Reverb B (Music 2), Reverb C (Game 1), and Reverb D (Game 2).

Amount powered affects:

The received power is used as the weight of the blend (averaging) with other gadgets. If fully powered, it will average evenly. If powered very little, it will not affect the settings very much.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006266666666666667% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

# Reverb Properties

# Reverb Preset

A number of impulse response settings that make the audio sound like it’s being played inside different settings. A visualisation of the impulse response is represented as a wave form. The name of the chosen impulse response will be shown as the name of the gadget.

Drag a slice from a sound gadget’s slice mapper into this setting to set it as the impulse response and save it to the -1 position.

The built-in reverb impulses have the following names:

0

Marble Mausoleum (Lge)

1

Echoing Cathedral (Lge)

2

Empty Warehouse (Lge)

3

Cathedral (Lge)

4

Sports Hall (Lge)

5

Reactor Hall (Lge)

6

Marble Hall (Med)

7

Underground Car Part (Med)

8

Partitioned Factory Hall (Med)

9

Studio (Med)

10

Reflective Auditorium (Med)

11

Sitting Room (Med)

12

Reflective Auditorium Balcony (Med)

13

Brick Kiln v. Short Slap (Outdoor)

14

Sharp Single Echo (Outdoor)

15

Echoey (Outdoor)

16

Roofless Court Echoes (Outdoor)

17

Triple Slap Echoes (Outdoor)

18

Brick Kiln Short Echoes (Outdoor)

19

Underground Tomb (Sm)

20

Concrete Acoustic Dome (Sm)

21

Church w. Acoustic Jars (Sm)

22

Church Transept (Sm)

23

Sitting Room (Sm)

24

Hard Corridor (Sm)

25

Summer Forest (Outdoor)

26

Long Single Echo (Outdoor)

# Volume

The volume of the reverb effect’s output.

# Reverb Pre-Delay

How much time the reverb is delayed after the input sound.

At 0%, there is no delay. At 100%, there is a delay of 165 milliseconds (0.165 seconds). (As explained by Ed Hargrave.)

# Pitch Shift

Note: Is this actually the speed of the impulse?

Shifts the pitch of the input audio.

# Shorten

Note: Percentage of the way through the impulse?

The higher the setting, the sooner the impulse is cut off.

# Infinite Reverb

The volume of the signal kept as it goes through the reverb process. The higher the setting, the longer the input signal will carry. At 100%, the input signal will never die.

# Reverb Effects

# Distortion Amount

Applies distortion to the impulse.

# Reverb Chaining

The amount of this reverb’s output to pass on to another reverb later in the processing chain. For this reason, B can only be sent to C or D, C can only be sent to D, and D cannot be chained at all.

# Next Reverb Channel

The channel to send to.

Reverb B (Music 2)

Chain to Reverb B.*

Reverb C (Game 1)

Chain to Reverb C.*

Reverb D (Game 2)

Chain to Reverb D.*

# Dynamics Compressor

(See Sound Gadget > Compression.)

Compresses the reverb output.

# EQ Filter, Low Cut Frequency, High Cut Frequency

(See Sound Gadget > EQ Filter.)

Affects the equalisation of the reverb output.

# Delay

Contains the tabs:

Controls the delay settings for the 4 main channels. Each channel has its own version of this gadget, with different settings.

There are 4 versions of this gadget: Delay A (Long), Delay B (Ping-Pong), Delay C (Dub Echo), and Delay D (Short Echo).

Amount powered affects:

The received power is used as the weight of the blend (averaging) with other gadgets. If fully powered, it will average evenly. If powered very little, it will not affect the settings very much.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

# Delay Properties

# Volume

The volume of the delay audio. Also shows a meter of the output of the delay channel.

# Playback Speed

Multiplies various time settings of the gadget.

Is multiplied by the parent playback speed similar to the Timeline Playback Speed setting.

# Time, Feedback

Time is how long the audio is delayed before a new iteration begins. Multiplied by the Playback Speed setting. While hovering over the top half of the graph, the tooltip shows the time between iterations in milliseconds. It also shows the nearest musical notation for that speed, assuming 100% speed has 2 beats per second.

Feedback is how much of the original volume each iteration keeps. Iterations continue until no volume is left.

Visualises each iteration as a vertical black bar from the bottom of the graph.

Note that while these settings send a Spice & Randomisation wire value and spicy and random range settings can be added, these are ignored.

# Beat Sync Delay Time

When on, the Time will snap to the note timings. The timings will also be multiplied by a parent timeline of the delay gadget.

# Rate, Depth

Affects the pitch of the chorus output over time. A sine wave increases and decreases the pitch.

Setting

Axis

Effect

Rate

X

how quick the sine wave goes from high to low

Depth

Y

how much the pitch is affected

# Reverb

(See Sound Gadget > Reverb.)

How much reverb to add to the delay iterations.

# Reverb Channel

(See Sound Gadget > Reverb.)

# Delay Effects

# Distortion Amount

(See Reverb Gadget > Distortion Amount.)

# Lo-Cut, Hi-Cut

(See Sound Gadget > EQ Filter.)

Cuts frequencies of the delay output that are lower or higher than the settings.

Lo-Cut defaults to 10%, and Hi-Cut defaults to 90%.

# Stereo Ping-Pong

Each delay iteration will come out of a different stereo channel (left or right). The stereo image is wider (the sound is cut off from the opposite side more) the higher the setting.

The first iteration of a new sound always comes out of the left side first.

# Surround Ping-Ping

Similar to Stereo Ping-Pong but bounces between the centre and rear channels instead.

# Sound Channel

(See Sound Gadget > Sound Channel.)

The delay volume and sound channel is independent from the audio source’s volume and channel.

# Master Mixer

Contains the settings:

Has sliders for the volume of each audio channel.

When more than one gadget is in the scene, the volume settings are added to 100% and then multiplied.

For example, if music is set to -25% and +80% by different gadgets, those settings actually apply 75% and 180% to the volume of those channels. Multiplied together that gives 135%.
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006125% gameplay > things per object.

Tweak Menu

# General

Added to 100%, then multiplies the volume of all output from this channel.

For example, a setting of 20% will be added to 100%. A sound effect using this channel will play at 120% of its normal set volume.

Note that the audio coming out of the PS4 will also be affected by the player’s audio settings for this channel.

# Music

(See Master Mixer Gadget > General.)

Affects the music channel.

Note that while playing music from another PS4 app such as Spotify, the music channel is muted.

# Voice

(See Master Mixer Gadget > General.)

Affects the voice channel.

# Character

(See Master Mixer Gadget > General.)

Affects the character channel.

# Background

(See Master Mixer Gadget > General.)

Affects the background channel.

# Gameplay

(See Master Mixer Gadget > General.)

Affects the gameplay channel.

# Channel

Contains the settings:

Cannot be named directly.

General Channel, Music Channel, Voice Channel, Character Channel, Background Channel, and Gameplay Channel.

Amount powered affects:

When there are multiple gadgets for the same channel, settings are blended (averaged). This averaging is weighted by the power they are receiving.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006266666666666667% gameplay > things per object.

While on a timeline:

has fader handles.

Tweak Menu

# Volume

The volume output of this channel.

# Distortion Amount

Adds distortion to all audio on this channel.

# Chain Reverb Amount

(See Reverb Gadget > Reverb Chaining.)

# Next Reverb Channel

(See Reverb Gadget > Next Reverb Channel.)

# Ambisonic Panning

Note: confirm this is on 3d-panned sources

For 3D Panned sound sources using this channel, when the player is wearing the VR headset and earphones sources will sound as though they are coming from above or below as well as left/right/forward/back relative to the orientation of their head within the game.

# Dynamics Compressor

(See Sound Gadget > Compression.)

Affects the compression of the channel output.

# EQ Filter, Low Cut Frequency, High Cut Frequency

(See Sound Gadget > EQ Filter.)

Affects the equalisation of the channel output.

# Connectors

Contents:

To join two objects together, first click on the “parent” object with the yellow sphere (the object that won’t move in relation to the joint), and then click on the “child” object with the blue sphere (the object that will move in relation to the joint). (Mm) (Jj) (Tg) When a connector is placed the child will have “movable” turned on. (Jj)

For joint connectors, a purple joint will appear exactly between the yellow and blue ends of the connector. And once placed the position of the yellow and blue nodes doesn’t matter. They’re just a handy indicator as to what the ends of the connector are attached to. The purple joint’s position and angle dictates how the connector will behave. You can move the purple joint independently of the yellow and blue nodes.

While the connector is selected, or you have hold of the purple joint, indicators will display showing you how the joint will behave. For example, a circle showing angle at which a joint can spin, or lines showing the angle limits. (Jj)

Now, if you move the parent object, the child object will move with it. And if you try to move the child object, it will only move as allowed by the connector. (Though beware of moving things while time is paused; strange things can happen if you move an object attached as the parent of a connector. Always rewind first.)

To reposition connectors, press Triangle button over a child object with a connector linked to a parent object. Now the objects can be freely moved, while leaving the purple “joint” part of the connector in the same place. The position of the yellow and blue ends of the connector will update to keep the same relative position to the object they are each attached to. (Tg)

Moving the parent will not move the child, and moving the child will ignore the constraints of the joint. (Mm) While repositioning, you can also move the yellow and blue ends. If you release them while hovering over another object, that end will now be attached to that object. (Mm)

An important thing to note about connectors is that the child will have “movable” turned on when placing the connector. If you want an object to be constrained by a joint but not move on its own because it has an unbalanced mass, turn off gravity and lower its density.

# Joint

Contains the settings:

A connector with a specific point in space acting as a pivot, around which the child object may move at a set distance. Depending on the type of joint this movement may have further limitations.

For all input and output explanations, “clockwise” and “anti-clockwise” are as if looking from the joint in the direction of the child node—as demonstrated by the small amount of stalk sticking out on the child side of the purple node.

Tweak Menu

# Type

What type of joint this connector is. (Jj)

# Ball Joint

Rotates freely around the purple node’s position.

# Bolt

Rotates in the z axis of the purple node.

# Motor Bolt

Works identically to the bolt, but automatically adds forces to turn the joint to a target rotation. (Jj)

Has a persistent direction it is rotating in, which starts at clockwise by default. If Use Limits is on, then this direction is flipped when it gets to one end or the other of those limits.

# Tightness

Dictates how much force is required to make the joint move. (Jj)

# Springiness

Unavailable:

when in Motor Bolt mode.

Higher springyness adds forces trying to preserve the target rotation of the joint. (Tg) Alternatively, a keyframe can be used to add springyness without using the physics system. (Tg)

For the ball joint and bolt, the target rotation is set by the initial position of the child.

# Collide with Connected

When on, collision works as normal. When off, any collisions between the child and parent objects will be ignored. (Jj)

Having this turned on can cause physics problems with a group of collected objects constantly colliding with themselves.

# Lock Rotation

Available:

when in Ball Joint mode.

When on, prevents the ball joint from rotating around its Z axis as defined by the line from the blue parent node to the purple joint.

# Cycles per Minute

Available:

when in Motor Bolt mode.

Used to calculate the target rotational speed of a motor bolt. (Jj)

When positive, the default direction will be clockwise.

# Strength

Available:

when in Motor Bolt mode.

How much force is applied to force the joint into the correct position.

# Reverse

Available:

when in Motor Bolt mode.

When on, the direction is flipped.

# Use Limits

When on, the behaviour of the joint will be limited depending on what type of joint it is in some way. (Jj) When on, a gizmo will be shown to manipulate the limits. (Jj)

Moving a yellow handle past the blue handle will move the blue handle along with it to stay within the limits. Moving a blue handle past a yellow handle will move the yellow handle to expand the limits. Moving yellow handles will be blocked past the other yellow handle.

A bolt can only rotate between two specific angles. When limits are on, the gizmo shows two yellow handles—one for each end of the limit—and a blue handle representing the bolt’s current rotation relative to the limit range.

A motor bolt works similarly to the bolt when limited. Additionally, its rotations will bounce between the two yellow handles.

A ball joint has a different kind of gizmo. It shows a cone with a rounded base to visualise the limit range. Drag the edge of the base with Cross button to adjust the range.

# Angle Limits Range

Dictates the angle of motion allowed within the limits. This updates when the limit indicators are manipulated. Changing this will push the yellow lines away from the angle exactly in between them. (Jj)

# Connector Position

Available:

when in Motor Bolt mode.

When wired, overrides the target rotation.

The received value is normalised depending on whether Use Limits is on or off, and then used to set the target rotation. The Motor Bolt will then use that target rotation instead of the animated target it normally uses.

When Use Limits is off, a negative value will set the target to rotate anti-clockwise that many times (a value of -5 will target a 5 full rotations anti-clockwise).

When Use Limits is on, the received value is clamped to a range of -1 to 1 (meaning sending in a -1.2 will cause a value of -1 to be used). A value of 0 will set the target to the exact middle between the two yellow handles. A -1 will set it to the anti-clockwise yellow handle, and a 1 will set it to the clockwise yellow handle.

Note that the motor bolt will still use the normal settings to get to this rotation. This simply sets the target rotation.

# Connector Completion

Sends a signal representing the current position rotation of the joint. (Jj) (Tg)

A 0 is sent while the rotation is at the base position—the same as when the joint was made. Other values are sent depending on the type of joint used and whether limits are on or not.

Bolts and Motor Bolts will send higher values as the joint rotates clockwise as looking from the joint towards the child node. When rotated 180 degrees clockwise, it loops around to -180 and continues up from there.

When limits are on, Bolts and Motor Bolts send a 0 while the blue handle is at the anti-clockwise yellow handle to 1 while the blue handle is at the clockwise yellow handle. Effectively a percentage of how far through the limit the bolt currently is.

Ball Joints send a higher value up to 1 as it reaches 180 degrees from the base position.

# Linear

Contains the settings:

For explanations, “start” is defined as the furthest parent end of the connector, and “end” is the furthest child end of the connector.

Gizmo:

Yellow handle at the start, blue handle at the end. Elastic only shows the yellow handle.

Tweak Menu

# Connector Type

The type of connector will affect the constraints of movement of the child object.

# Piston

Similar to Slider mode, but powers movement along the same line. Has a target position that is animated along that linear path. Also has a direction it’s moving in.

Defaults to pushing towards the end.

# Slider

Allows linear movement towards and away from the parent position. The child object’s orientation is locked.

# String

Allows free movement within a certain range of distance from the parent node.

# Elastic

Similar to String mode, but allows a springyness as if tied to a piece of elastic.

# Tightness

How hard it is for the child node to move.

# Minimum Length

Available:

when in Piston mode.

Cannot exceed Maximum Length.

The minimum point the piston can travel to.

Linked to the gizmo’s yellow handle.

# Maximum Length

The maximum point a piston can travel to.

Cannot be smaller than Minimum Length. Cannot be set to smaller than the current distance between parent and child nodes, but using Triangle button will default it to the Minimum Length.

When adding a new linear connector, this is set to the distance between the parent and child nodes.

Linked to the gizmo’s blue handle.

# Collide with Connected

When on, allows the child object to collide with the parent object.

# Cycles Per Minute

Available:

when in Piston mode.

The speed the piston will move towards the target position, relative to the distance between the start and end.

For example, when the start and end is 2m apart and the cycles/minute is at 15, the target position and piston will move at 1m/second.

# Motor Strength

Available:

when in Piston mode.

The amount of force used to push the child to the target position.

# Reverse Direction

Available:

when in Piston mode.

When off from the start of the scene, the piston will move the child away from the parent first. When on from the start of the scene, the piston will move the child toward the parent first.

When changed during the scene, the target end (pushing away or pulling in) will be inverted.

# Slack Length

Available:

when in Elastic mode.

The distance the child object will be pulled towards.

Linked to the gizmo’s yellow handle.

# Strength

Available:

when in Elastic mode.

The strength of the elastic to pull the child object back towards the “slack” distance.

# Connector Position

While a wire is connected, the target position is set based on the received value and the internal direction setting is ignored.

Clamps the received value to between 0 and 1, then uses that as the target position.

# Connector Completion

Available:

when in Piston mode.

How far through from start to end the child currently is. When further than the end, the value continues increasing at the same rate. (Tg)

Effectively, how far from the start the child is, as a multiple of the distance from the start to the end.

# Object Tweak Menus

Contents:

Objects other than gadgets have tweak menus and settings as well. Here’s how they work...

# Sculpt

Note: thermo for shared memory?
Contains the tabs:
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.0094% gameplay > things per object. Graphics > sculpture data is taken up by the final built surface of a sculpt, multiplied by the surface tightness/detail/density of that surface. Graphics > Sculpture physical shape is used by the spheres that fill a sculpt for use by the physics engine.

# Physical Simulation

When a sculpt is movable, or inside a group and one of its parent groups is movable, it will be part of the physics simulation.

When such a sculpt (A) is near another sculpt (B), checks are made between the two for if it is possible for them to collide.

It is possible for them to collide with each other if:

  • A is collidable, and B is collidable.
  • And B either “collides with” a label of A or has a label that A collides with.
  • And B is either not inside a group, or all groups B is a child of “collide with” a label of A.

If it moves slower than a threshold of velocity for long enough (such as coming to rest on a flat surface), and is not being affected by a mover or rotator gadget or similar, it will “sleep” and stop being simulated.

If the sculpt begins moving, or a nearby sculpt moves, and it is found that a collision is possible, or the sculpt begins moving, it will “wake” and continue to be simulated.

# Outer Properties

Settings for the overall look of the sculpt, including the flecks.

# Tint

The colour of the tint applied blended with the spraypainted colour of the sculpt itself.

When the Tint Amount is at 0% and then the colour is set, the Tint Amount will be set at 50%. Note that this doesn’t happen when recording with a keyframe.

# Tint Amount

How much the tint colour affects the final colour of the sculpt.

0% doesn’t apply the tint at all. Closer to 100%, the tint will affect colours less saturated and closer to middle-grey. Reaching 200%, the tint will override the colours completely.

# Original Colour Saturation

The colour saturation of the sculpt itself.

Applied before tinting.

# Hue Cycle

Hues can be thought of as on a wheel—hence the “degrees” unit for this setting. Around the circle we move from red to blue to green to yellow and back to red. (Tg)

Adjusting the hue cycle rotates all the sculpt’s colours around that wheel.

For example, say there is a spraypainted patch of red, and a patch of blue. Now add Hue Cycle of 90 degrees. The red will shift around to blue, and the blue will shift around to green.

Applied before tinting.

# Shinyness/Roughness

Shiny shows a circular specular highlight of spotlights, the sun according to its size, and glowing objects and diffuse lights have a more hazy highlight. The more shinyness, the tighter the highlight is. The less shinyness the wider and less defined the highlight is.

Rough hides the specular highlight. The more roughness, the less opacity the specular highlight has. The less roughness, the more opacity the specular has.

So the shinyness/roughness slider can be thought of as: 0% defined specular, 50% diffuse specular, 100% no-opacity specular.

# Waxyness/Metalness

Waxy allows light to be blocked less by the surface a light hits, allowed to absorb through the sculpt to other surfaces of the sculpt. So using this you can make an effect like a sheet with an image projected on it. Though if the sculpt casts a shadow, it will still cast a fully opaque shadow. The more waxyness, the further a given light can travel through the sculpt. The less waxyness, the shorter a given light can travel through the sculpt.

Metal causes the colours to reflect less of the sculpt’s colour and the colour of the light that hits its surfaces, and instead reflects the sky image. When at full shinyness, the sky image can be clearly reflected. When the finish is more rough, the colours of the sky affect the sculpt’s appearance. From around 15% shinyness up, it instead uses the diffuse light as normal.

# Glow

How intensely the colours on the sculpt’s surface (after tinting) glow. (Tg) This affects lens flare and bloom.

# Emit Light from Glow

Dictates when the glow will emit light to the surroundings. (Pk)

When looking at a glowing object that can emit light, it will always emit light. This light soaks into the surrounding area over time, and is absorbed by objects that cast shadows. The light from an object that has a higher glow setting will soak further away from the object. It is this light that is picked up by the distance fog in the scene.

When a glowing object is obscured by a sculpt or is not on-screen, the amount of light it emits is dependent on how close the view is to the object.

For example, if you look away from a light-emitting sculpt you may be able to see the edge of a platform. But as you move away from the light source towards the edge it becomes darker and darker until you’re far enough away from the source and it is emitting no light—making it impossible to see the edge of the platform.
Never:

lets the sculpt itself glow visually without illuminating other objects nearby.

When visible:

means the object will only emit light when the object has the Visible setting on.

Always:

causes the object to always emit light whether the object has the Visible setting on or not.

# Cast Shadows

Dictates when shadows will be cast by this sculpt. (Pk)

Never

means any occluded light source will still cast light through the object.

When visible

means the object will only cast shadows when the object is also set to be visible.

Always

causes the object to cast shadows whether the object is visible or not.

# Inner Properties

Similar to the Outer Properties, but applying to the inner “hull” of the sculpt beyond the flecks.

Has the settings: Colour, Colour Amount, Original Colour Saturation, Hue Cycle, and Glow.

# Fleck Properties

The same settings as a painting has, without the Stretch setting.

# Effects

Individual settings, one for each effect type.

# Physical

# Movable

When on, the sculpt will react as a physical object within the scene. (Pk) Because of this, objects that are movable can fall away from each other, even when they’re inside a group. (Mm)

When being moved by a keyframe, the sculpt appears to lose friction until it reaches the true position the keyframe is moving it to. (Tg)

Note that an object affected by a mover/follower/rotator of some kind will be pseudo-movable. It will not respond to collisions or forces unless it is actually movable. But it will move independently of any group it is contained by. (Tg)

# Visible

This is a switch. When on, the sculpt will be visible in the scene. When off, the sculpt will not be visible in the scene.

Note that something can be invisible and still be collidable or cast shadows. This switch only affects the visibility of the sculpt and nothing else.

# Collidable

When off, no collisions involving this sculpt will happen.

When on, other collidable sculpts that can be collided with or that can collide with this sculpt will cause collisions if either of the sculpts are movable.

Note that collidability only takes effect when in play mode. While editing and moving things around, you can place collidable objects so that they overlap each other without a problem. (Pk)

# Friction

Only works when movable is turned on. Affects how the sculpt reacts when it would scrape against object that it collides with. (Pk)

# Bounciness

When the sculpture collides with the surface of another sculpture, its direction will reflect off the surface, and its speed will be preserved by the amount dictated by the bounciness setting.

For example, a ball is heading for the ground at 10 m/s, and its bounciness is set to 60%. When it hits the ground it will start moving in the opposite direction at 6 m/s.

# Squashyness

How deformed the physics spheres can become from their original positions. At a non-zero value, the sculpt is rendered based on the positions of the physics spheres.

The rendering of the sculpt will stretch along one axis that best fits the physics spheres’ current form.

# Density

How dense the sculpt is. The weight/mass used for physics simulations is the volume of the sculpt multiplied by its density.

Note that this does not affect physics gadgets (eg. Follower); only physically simulated collisions will be affected.

# Ignore Gravity

When off, the scene’s global gravity will affect the physics simulation of this sculpt if it is movable or a containing group is movable.

When on, global gravity will not affect this object’s physics simulation.

With “ignore gravity” on, custom and controllable gravity can be added using a simple Mover. (Tg)

# Imp Interaction

Dictates how the imp will interact with the sculpt.

None

means the imp will not affect or be affected by the sculpt in any way.

Collide

means the imp will move around the sculpt when it comes into contact with it.

Grab

means the imp will be able to grab this sculpt. When hovering over the sculpt, the dot on its antenna will glow, indicating a grabbable object.

# Physics Cost

Collidable sculpts that are movable or part of a movable group have physics spheres generated within them to be used as part of the physics simulation. The more physics spheres are used, the more performance is required to run the physics for that object.

Changing this setting on an applicable sculpt shows these spheres within the sculpt for 2 seconds. To see these spheres permanently, and colour coded for the performance cost of the sculpt, use the Test Mode’s Physics heatmap.

Low

Physics spheres will be more spread out.

When a sculpt that is just a sphere is set to low physics cost, only one physics sphere is used, and so its collision is perfectly spherical.

Medium

Physics spheres will be less spread out.

High

Physics spheres will be more tightly packed.

# Collides With

Dictates which labels are required on a sculpt to collide with this one.

# Collides with

(See Labels.)

# Labels & Ownership

# Labels

Has no “Unlabelled” switch. For an object to be considered unlabelled, it must have no labels switched on.

(See Labels.)

# Detected

Sends a signal while detected by a Trigger Zone. (Tg)

# Player Ownership

Sets and gets the player that owns this sculpt.

# Audio Surface Type

# Audio Surface Type

Which audio surface type this object will send through the Collision wire as an ID when another object impacts with it.

Default

The default surface type. ID = 0.

Metal

The metal surface type. ID = 1.

Stone

The stone surface type. ID = 2.

Wood

The wood surface type. ID = 3.

Dirt

The dirt surface type. ID = 4.

Gravel

The gravel surface type. ID = 5.

Grass

The grass surface type. ID = 6.

Liquid

The liquid surface type. ID = 7.

# Painting

Note: check it all
Contains the tabs:
Gizmo:

An arrow setting the direction the Wind effect will travel.

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.0092% gameplay > things per object.

# Coat Properties

# Tint Colour, Tint Amount, Original Saturation, Shinyness/Roughness, Shinyness/Metalness, Glow

(See Sculpt Mode > Outer Properties.)

Most settings in this tab work the same as the corresponding sculpt settings.

# Opacity

How opaque the flecks are. Lower means more see-through or transparent. (Pk)

# Finish

How much the finish of the edits within the painting will be overridden by the tweak menu finish settings.

# Emit Light From Glow

Unavailable:

when glow is at 0%.

Makes the paint appear to light up.

When on, light will soak into the surroundings and illuminate other objects.

When off, glow will only affect how the paint itself is rendered.

# Fleck Properties

# Ruffle

Each fleck has a randomly-seeded 3D ruffle rotation. As the ruffle is set higher, a fleck will be rendered closer to that ruffle rotation.

If the fleck was made with Surface Snap on, it will only rotate around its Z axis—as if stuck onto the surface at a different rotation. Similar to how flecks ruffle on a sculpt.

Negative ruffle will take ruffle away from individual flecks that have ruffle applied to them using the Ruffle tool.

# Impasto

Each fleck has a special impasto map included. Upping the impasto uses this map to offset the height of the fleck along its surface (its Z axis), making it “fatter”—and in some cases multi-layered.

At 0% impasto, the fleck is at some default thickness, but not absolutely flat.

Negative impasto truly flattens the fleck.

Each fleck can have a maximum of 300% impasto. Plus the painting setting of 300% impasto, for a maximum appearance of 600% impasto. (Jl)

# Looseness

As looseness is increased, each fleck in the painting is scaled up.

At 100% looseness a fleck is approximately twice the size: double the width and double the height.

This is the limit of how large a fleck can be made after creation, however.

# Stretch

Stretches each fleck in the direction it’s facing.

# Stroke

Settings for how flecks are to be rendered based on the start and end of each individual stroke. (Pk)

Note that this is affected by the Animate in Sequence setting. (Tg)

# Start Point

How far along each stroke in the painting the flecks will start rendering. (Tg)

# End Point

How far along each stroke in the painting the flecks will stop rendering. (Tg)

Start Point or End Point can be set to draw a line only to a certain point. (Tg)

# Fleck Density

How dense the flecks are packed in to the stroke. A low density will leave gaps between each successive fleck, whereas a high density will close those gaps. Fleck settings (eg. colour) are taken from the nearest original fleck.

# Stroke Fade In

When on, the flecks from the start of a stroke roughly one third from the start are affected.

Note, this is done on a stroke by stroke basis.

The closer they are to the start, the more transparent and smaller they become. The first fleck is approximately half its normal size (half width and half height), and at 5% normal opacity.

# Stroke Fade Out

Similar to Stroke Fade In, but affecting the flecks from the end of a stroke to roughly one third from the end.

# Duplicates

Duplicates the painting relative to the origin of the painting. Duplicates do not add to the graphics thermometer.

All strokes, even duplicates, react to Wind effects and animations individually.

Other physics such as from force appliers or movement is copied from the original stroke’s starting position.

# Positional Duplicates

Duplicates the painting preserving orientation but randomly changing position in directions allowed by the setting. (Pk)

None

means there are no positional duplicates.

Inside Sphere

Clones are placed within a sphere.

Around Camera

Clones are placed within a sphere in view of the camera. As the camera moves, copies no longer seen won’t be rendered, and new ones will be rendered when in range. (Pk)

On Plane

Clones are placed on the surface of a flat square plane, whose surface points up.

On Disc

Similar to On Plane, but on a circular area.

Along Line

Clones are placed along a line to the left and right of the original. The direction of this line is aimed to the left and right, perpendicular to the “upright” of the painting.

# Rotational Duplicates

Duplicates the painting, randomly rotating each around the origin in directions allowed by the setting. (Pk) (Pk)

None

means there are no rotational duplicates.

All Directions

will make copies randomly going in all directions, centred at the starting point of the painting.

Around Hemisphere

will make copies similar to the “all directions” setting, but only have them on one side.

Around Cylinder

will make copies similar to the “all directions” setting, but only have them on one axis.

# Copies

Unavailable:

when Rotational and Positional Duplicates are set to None.

How many copies to render.

# Clone Spread

Unavailable:

when Positional Duplicates is set to None.

Affects the distance from the origin point of the painting that the copies will be shown at. (Mm)

# Scale Jitter

Unavailable:

when Rotational and Positional Duplicates are set to None.

The range of sizes away from the original size that a clone can be. Each clone is scaled from the origin point of the painting to a random degree between 100% - [jitter] and 100% + [jitter]. (Mm)

For example, at 50% each stroke will be scaled between 0.5 and 1.5 times its original size.

# Animation

Increase the animation speed to have flecks smoothly travel along the drawn line, adhering to the size of the original line but each fleck retaining its own opacity. If you turn down the fleck density, the gaps will travel along the line at the same speed.

The animation tab has various ways of animating the flecks along each stroke. (Pk)

# Playback Speed

The speed at which each stroke’s flecks move along the line. If there is a lower fleck density, the gaps move along the stroke in the same way. (Mm)

# Animate in Sequence

Strokes are considered to be one stroke, in the order they were created.

Note, this doesn’t just affect animations.

# Loop

Note: How does loop off affect animation?

When off, plays whatever animation would happen once only.

When on, seamlessly replays the animation constantly.

# Pulse

When switched on, instead of the flecks moving along the line, the flecks stay in the same position and a “pulse” is animated along the stroke instead. A pulse has a gradient to it according to the Trail Length setting. At the front of a pulse, it’s at full strength. This strength falls off linearly towards the end of a pulse.

Flecks are rendered with their size being multiplied by the strength of the pulse at their position. (Mm) (Pk)

# Trail Length

Unavailable:

when Playback Speed is 0%, or Pulse is off.

The length of the pulse’s trail relative to the length of that stroke. (Pk)

# Jet Trail

When on, a fleck will follow its normal animated path, but that path will not move as the painting object itself moves. This has the effect of individual flecks floating behind as the painting is moved. (Mm)

Note that Frame-by-Frame animation will also update these paths as they animate.

# Frame-by-Frame

Settings controlling the frames of the painting.

# Frame

The current frame of the painting to show. Can be set by wire. (Tg)

When exiting editing a painting, will be set to the last edited frame.

# Animation Type

(See Action Recorder > Playback Mode.)

Affects the playback of the paint frames.

Includes the None option to not animate the frames at all.

# Speed

Unavailable:

when Animation Type is set to None.

How many frames per second each frame is shown for. (Tg)

# Stop Motion Movement

When on and time is running and the frame changes, the current position of the painting will be stored. Strokes will be rendered with the start relative to the stored position instead of the painting object’s current position.

If attached at both ends, the end of the stroke will not be affected.

# Effects

Individual settings, one for each effect type. Paintings have one added effects setting: Hand-Drawn Animation.

The offset for the timing of a fleck’s animation is based on the order it was created within that painting.

# Hand-Drawn Animation

This effect moves all flecks away from their original positions by some amount over time. This amount changes at intervals.

The higher this setting, the further the flecks move and the shorter the interval—making it appear more animated.

# Physical Properties

# Physical

When on, the paint will have some limited physical reactions to things such as being moved or forces being applied. (Pk) Note that when strokes move, the start always stays in the same position.

# Attached at Both Ends

When on, the start and end points will remain static, while the length of the strokes can physically move. (Pk)

# Attach End to Object

Click this button and then a different object. While the tweak menu is open, the target object will have a translucent white sphere around it. The ends of all strokes within the painting will now keep their position relative to the position orientation and scale of the target object. Press Triangle button on the button to remove this link.

# Floppiness

How much each stroke can deform when forces affect the painting.

# Wind Strength

The higher this is, the more the “wind” affects the paint strokes. (Pk) Requires the paint to have floppiness so that it moves in the wind.

If wind strength is more than 0%, a white widget appears allowing you to move the wind and change its direction relative to the painting. (Pk)

# Wind Flap Frequency

The higher this is, the faster the waves of wind hit. (Pk)

# Wind Ripple

How randomly offset each stroke’s wind flap is.

# Wind Direction Local

Available:

when the paint is physical and has a positive wind strength.

The direction of the wind will adjust as the paint object’s orientation is changed.

# Gravity

Simulates gravity on the strokes, as if there was a projectile fired from the start point toward the end point. (Mm)

Works even when the painting is not physical.

# Labels

For use with the Force Applier.

# Group

Contains the tabs:
# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.003095402298850574% gameplay > things per object.

# Contained Objects Movement

Pseudo-movable objects will not move with the group.

When using a rotator, to have the object also move with the group a connector can be used attached to something non-movable within the group to anchor it. (Tg)

Objects with keyframed positions will be positioned relative to the group. (See Restoring Positinos within Groups.)

# Physical Properties

At the bottom of this tab is a readout of the sum of all the weight of contained sculpts.

# Visible

When on, objects inside the group may be seen if they are powered and visible.

When off, objects inside the group may not be seen. Note that this only affects Sculpts and Paintings.

# Movable

While on and the group contains at least one sculpt, the group’s movement will be physically simulated. Any contained non-movable objects will move with the group and will be used to calculate collisions for the group. (Tg)

Because of this, a group containing a lot of sculpts can be very performance-expensive to simulate the movement of as there are a lot of objects to check collision for.

# Labels & Ownership

# Collision Labels

# Audio

# Wire Blend Modes

Contents:

Each input tab for a setting has a wire blend type which affects how the inputs from connected wires affect the final value used by the gadget. (Tg)

# Overwrite

When connecting a wire to a setting currently at 0, the blend mode is set to Overwrite.

Sets the setting’s value to the OR of the input values. The OR of a set of values is the highest magnitude (furthest from 0).

When there is a tie, the source gadget created first is used. When the values come from the same source gadget, the setting later in the gadget (further down the window or from a later tab) is used. (Tg)

# Modulate

When connecting a wire to the input of a setting that has a non-zero value, the blend mode is set to Modulate.

Finds the OR of the input signals. If the result is a fat wire, the default value of the fat wire is used.

The result is multiplied by the original base value of that setting. (Tg) (See Overwrite Blending.)

# Blend

Sums the power of the source gadgets of all input signals. Sums the signals received from those inputs. Divides the signal sum by the power sum.

Effectively averages the input values. (Tg)

# Wire Types

Contents:

Certain outputs send specific types of wires. Some contain more than one value for use in more advanced logic. These are displayed as many thin wires wrapped into a rainbow-coloured cable and so are known as “fat wires.” (Jj)

# Thermometer & Performance Limits:

0.006184895833333333% gameplay > wires & animation per object.

# Default Value

Fat wires have their own “default” value that is used by gadgets that cannot make use of the separate values bundled into the fat wire. There are a number of ways to get this default value:

# Boolean

Boolean outputs send 1 or 0. Pulse outputs use boolean wire types.

Components:

Boolean.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Logic×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Logic×Number=Numberthe value of Number is combined with Boolean
Logic×Signal=Signalthe value of Boolean is combined with Signal.
Logic×Player level=Player levelthe default of Boolean is combined with each Player Info component.
Logic×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Wireless controller X/Y Axisthe default of Boolean is combined with each Left/Right Stick component.
Logic×Paint bucket=Paint bucketthe default of Boolean is combined with each Colour component.
Logic×Four=Fourthe default of Boolean is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Logic×Three=Threethe default of Boolean is combined with each 3 Numbers component.
Logic×Two=Twothe default of Boolean is combined with each 2 Numbers component.
Logic×Sliders=Slidersthe default of Boolean is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Logic×Rotate=Rotatethe default of Boolean is combined with each Rotation component.
Logic×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Logic×Collidable=Collidabledefault of Boolean is combined with Collision impact.
Logic×Music=Musicdefault of Boolean is combined with Music volume.

# Number

Similar to the Signal wire type.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Number×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Number×Logic=Numberthe value of Number is combined with Boolean
Number×Signal=Signalthe value of Number is combined with Signal.
Number×Player level=Player levelthe default of Number is combined with each Player Info component.
Number×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Wireless controller X/Y Axisthe default of Number is combined with each Left/Right Stick component.
Number×Paint bucket=Paint bucketthe default of Number is combined with each Colour component.
Number×Four=Fourthe default of Number is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Number×Three=Threethe default of Number is combined with each 3 Numbers component.
Number×Two=Twothe default of Number is combined with each 2 Numbers component.
Number×Sliders=Slidersthe default of Number is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Number×Rotate=Rotatethe default of Number is combined with each Rotation component.
Number×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Number×Collidable=Collidabledefault of Number is combined with Collision impact.

# Colour

A colour represented as red, green, and blue channels as percentages. (Tg)

When there is a colour setting for an object, the wire will automatically attach to the first colour setting.

A colour can be fed from one setting to another to ensure they match perfectly. (Tg)

Default Value:

The relative luminance of the colour (how bright the colour is visually). Luminance is calculated using the formula (0.2126 * [red]) + (0.7152 * [green]) + (0.0722 * [blue]).

Components:

Red, Green, Blue.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Paint bucket×Signal=Paint bucketthe default of Signal is combined with each Colour component.
Paint bucket×Player level=Paint bucketthe value of Colour is combined with Player Info controller colour.
Paint bucket×Music=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Paint bucket×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Paint bucketthe default of Left/Right Stick is combined with each Colour component.
Paint bucket×Logic=Paint bucketthe default of Boolean is combined with each Colour component.
Paint bucket×Two=Two?
Paint bucket×Number=Paint bucketthe default of Number is combined with each Colour component.
Paint bucket×Four=Fourthe default of Colour is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Paint bucket×Three=Threethe default of Colour is combined with each 3 Numbers component.
Paint bucket×Sliders=Slidersthe default of Colour is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Paint bucket×Rotate=Rotateeach component is combined in order.
Paint bucket×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Paint bucket×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Paint bucket×Collidable=Collidabledefault of Colour is combined with Collision impact.

# Transform

A scene-space transform, consisting of 8 components (3 for position, 4 for rotation, 1 for scale). These components are grouped as 3 fat wires.

When not set, position and rotation will default to (0, 0, 0), and scale will default to 1.

Note that inputs that can receive a Transform type value will also accept 3 Numbers type values and use them as the position.

All objects have a scene-space transform dictating where they appear in the scene (though this cannot be gotten as an output directly).

For example, you can move a sculpt around setting its position. You can rotate it, changing its orientation. And you can make it larger and smaller, setting its scale.
Default Value:

The scale of the transform.

Components:
Position

The position of the transform, where it is. A 3 Numbers fat wire. (Tg)

Orientation

The orientation of the transform, how it’s been rotated. A Rotation fat wire. (Tg)

Scale

The scale of the transform, how large something is. A Number wire.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Mover×Three=Movereach component is combined in order.
Mover×Signal=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Logic=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Number=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Paint bucket=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Four=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Two=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Sliders=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Rotate=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Music=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Player level=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Mover×Collidable=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Value of Collision position is combined with Transform position.
Mover×Eight=Mover value of Transform position is spread, and then position and scale are combined with 8 Numbers components, in order. As in, value of 8 Numbers A is combined with Transform position X. Value of 8 Numbers B is combined with Transform position Y. Value of 8 Numbers C is combined with Transform position Z. Value of 8 Numbers D is combined with Transform scale. Rotation is ignored.

# Signal

Default Value:

The sum of the positive and negative inputs. For example a positive of 6 and a negative of 4 will give a default of 2 (6 - 4).

Components:
Positive:

The positive signal when the number is positive.

Note, when a negative number is sent into this value using a combiner, it sets the actual value anyway. So sending a -5 would, when split, send 0 from Plus, and 5 from Minus.
Negative:

The absolute signal when the number is negative. This means the negative becomes positive; eg. -5 will become 5.

Note, when a negative number is sent into this value using a combiner, it is ignored.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Signal×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Signal×Logic=Signalthe value of Boolean is combined with Signal.
Signal×Number=Signalthe value of Number is combined with Signal.
Signal×Four=Fourthe default of Signal is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Signal×Three=Threethe default of Signal is combined with each 3 Numbers component.
Signal×Two=Twothe default of Signal is combined with each 2 Numbers component.
Signal×Paint bucket=Paint bucketthe default of Signal is combined with each Colour component.
Signal×Sliders=Slidersthe default of Signal is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Signal×Rotate=Rotatethe default of Signal is combined with each Rotation component.
Signal×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Wireless controller X/Y Axisthe default of Signal is combined with each Left/Right Stick component.
Signal×Player level=Player levelthe default of Signal is combined with each Player Info component.
Signal×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Signal×Collidable=Collidabledefault of Signal is combined with Collision impact.
Signal×Music=Musicdefault of Signal is combined with Music volume.

# 4 Numbers

A 4-dimensional vector.

Default Value:

The magnitude of the vector: square root of ([A squared] + [B squared] + [C squared] + [D squared])

Components:

Letter A, Letter B, Letter C, Letter D.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Four×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Four×Signal=Fourthe default of Signal is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Four×Player level=Four(default?) of Player Info combined with each component of 4 Numbers.
Four×Music=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Four×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Fourthe default of Left/Right Stick is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Four×Logic=Fourthe default of Boolean is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Four×Number=Fourthe default of Number is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Four×Paint bucket=Fourthe default of Colour is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Four×Three=Foureach component is combined in order.
Four×Sliders=Foureach component is combined in order.
Four×Two=Fourthe default of 2 Numbers is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Four×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Four×Collidable=Collidabledefault of 4 Numbers is combined with Collision impact.
Four×Rotate=Fourvalues unaffected, but the fourth component of 4 Numbers set to 1.

# 3 Numbers

A 3-dimensional vector.

As components are read in the same order regardless of the wire type, inputs that expect a position (3 number) fat wire can also use a Transform fat wire. (Tg)

Default Value:

The magnitude of the vector: square root of ([A squared] + [B squared] + [C squared])

Components:

Letter A, Letter B, Letter C.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Three×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Three×Signal=Threethe default of Signal is combined with each 3 Numbers component.
Three×Collidable=Collidablethe value of 3 Numbers is combined with Collision position.
Three×Player level=Three(default?) of Player Info combined with each component of 3 Numbers.
Three×Music=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Three×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Threeeach component is combined in order.
Three×Logic=Threethe default of Boolean is combined with each 3 Numbers component.
Three×Number=Threethe default of Number is combined with each 3 Numbers component.
Three×Paint bucket=Threethe default of Colour is combined with each 3 Numbers component.
Three×Four=Foureach component is combined in order.
Three×Two=Threeeach component is combined in order.
Three×Sliders=Sliderseach component is combined in order.
Three×Rotate=Rotateeach component is combined in order.
Three×Mover=Movereach component is combined in order.

# 2 Numbers

A 2-dimensional vector.

Default Value:

The magnitude of the vector, or hypotenuse of the triangle: square root of ([A squared] + [B squared])

Components:

Letter A, Letter B.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Two×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Two×Signal=Twothe default of Signal is combined with each 2 Numbers component.
Two×Player level=Two(default?) of Player Info combined with each component of 2 Numbers.
Two×Music=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Two×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Wireless controller X/Y Axiseach component is combined in order.
Two×Logic=Twothe default of Boolean is combined with each 2 Numbers component.
Two×Paint bucket=Two?
Two×Number=Twothe default of Number is combined with each 2 Numbers component.
Two×Four=Fourthe default of 2 Numbers is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Two×Three=Threeeach component is combined in order.
Two×Sliders=Slidersthe default of 2 Numbers is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Two×Rotate=Rotatethe default of 2 Numbers is combined with each Rotation component.
Two×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Two×Collidable=Collidabledefault of 2 Numbers is combined with Collision impact.

# Spice & Randomisation

Represents a single sound setting with the ability to have spice and/or a random range. Such as a Split Slider setting.

Such settings can have a random range with a maximum and minimum value. Each time that setting is used by the engine, a random value within that range is used instead. They can also have a “spicy” version of the setting and random range, which is blended to depending on how “spicy” the note is that is being played. The spicy setting also has its own random range.

Default Value:

The middle point of the non-spicy random range.

Components:
Base:

The base value of the setting (maximum of the non-spicy randomised range).

Spice:

The spicey value of the setting (maximum of the spicy random range).

Random:

The minimum value of the non-spicy random range.

Randomised Spice:

The minimum value of the spicy random range.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Sliders×Signal=Slidersthe default of Signal is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Sliders×Music=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Sliders×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Slidersthe default of Left/Right Stick is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Sliders×Logic=Slidersthe default of Boolean is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Sliders×Number=Slidersthe default of Number is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Sliders×Paint bucket=Slidersthe default of Colour is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Sliders×Four=Foureach component is combined in order.
Sliders×Three=Sliderseach component is combined in order.
Sliders×Two=Slidersthe default of 2 Numbers is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Sliders×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Sliders×Player level=Slidersthe default of Player Info is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Sliders×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Sliders×Collidable=Collidabledefault of Spice & Randomisation is combined with Collision impact.
Sliders×Rotate=Slidersvalues unaffected, but the fourth component of Spice & Randomisation set to 1.

# Rotation

A rotation or orientation. Depending on which mode a splitter or combiner is in, the three components will be different. Yaw, pitch and roll in one mode. And X rotation, Y rotation, and Z rotation in “Axis and Angle” mode.

In axis mode, the components are calculated as a vector of rotation—the axis. And then the vector is multiplied by the angle rotated.

Rotations are in fact represented as quartnerions. Something like X, Y, Z (the vector of the rotation axis) and W (the magnitude, or how much it actually rotates around that vector). Splitters interpret those values and output them. Combiners interpret input values and create a quaternion.

Components:

Yaw, Pitch, Roll, X Rotation, Y Rotation, Z Rotation.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Rotate×Signal=Rotatethe default of Signal is combined with each Rotation component.
Rotate×Music=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Rotate×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Rotateeach component is combined in order.
Rotate×Logic=Rotatethe default of Boolean is combined with each Rotation component.
Rotate×Number=Rotatethe default of Number is combined with each Rotation component.
Rotate×Paint bucket=Rotateeach component is combined in order.
Rotate×Three=Rotateeach component is combined in order.
Rotate×Two=Rotatethe default of 2 Numbers is combined with each Rotation component.
Rotate×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Rotate×Player level=Rotatethe default of Player Info is combined with each Rotation component.
Rotate×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Rotate×Collidable=Collidabledefault of Rotation is combined with Collision impact.
Rotate×Four=Fourvalues unaffected, but the fourth component of 4 Numbers set to 1.
Rotate×Sliders=Slidersvalues unaffected, but the fourth component of Spice & Randomisation set to 1.

# 8 Numbers

An 8-dimensional vector.

Default Value:

The magnitude of the vector: square root of ([A squared] + [B squared] + [C squared] + [D squared] + [E squared] + [F squared] + [G squared] + [H squared]).

Components:

Letter A, Letter B, Letter C, Letter D, Letter E, Letter F, Letter G, Letter H.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Eight×Signal=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Number=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Logic=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Four=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Three=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Two=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Music=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Eight×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Paint bucket=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Sliders=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Rotate=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Player level=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Eight×Mover=Mover value of Transform position is spread, and then position and scale are combined with 8 Numbers components, in order. As in, value of 8 Numbers A is combined with Transform position X. Value of 8 Numbers B is combined with Transform position Y. Value of 8 Numbers C is combined with Transform position Z. Value of 8 Numbers D is combined with Transform scale. Rotation is ignored.
Eight×Collidable=Eightspread components of Collision are combined with components of 8 Numbers, in order. For example, Collision position X is combined with 8 Numbers volume, Collision position Y is combined with 8 Numbers button, etc.

# Collision

Data about a collision event.

Default Value:

The impact force.

Components:
Impact

The force of the impact.

Surface Type

The audio surface type of the surface the source object collided with.

Position

The scene position the impact happened at.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Collidable×Three=Collidablethe value of 3 Numbers is combined with Collision position.
Collidable×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Value of Collision position is combined with Transform position.
Collidable×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Collidabledefault of Left/Right Stick is combined with Collision impact.
Collidable×Logic=Collidabledefault of Boolean is combined with Collision impact.
Collidable×Number=Collidabledefault of Number is combined with Collision impact.
Collidable×Paint bucket=Collidabledefault of Colour is combined with Collision impact.
Collidable×Sliders=Collidabledefault of Spice & Randomisation is combined with Collision impact.
Collidable×Rotate=Collidabledefault of Rotation is combined with Collision impact.
Collidable×Player level=Collidabledefault of Player Info is combined with Collision impact.
Collidable×Four=Collidabledefault of 4 Numbers is combined with Collision impact.
Collidable×Two=Collidabledefault of 2 Numbers is combined with Collision impact.
Collidable×Signal=Collidabledefault of Signal is combined with Collision impact.
Collidable×Music=Musicspread components of Collision are combined with components of Music, in order. For example, Collision position X is combined with Music volume, Collision position Y is combined with Music button, etc.
Collidable×Eight=Eightspread components of Collision are combined with components of 8 Numbers, in order. For example, Collision position X is combined with 8 Numbers volume, Collision position Y is combined with 8 Numbers button, etc.

# Left/Right Stick

Represents how a Dualshock 4 controller’s stick is being pushed. Outputs of this type are between -1 and 1, with a magnitude between 0 and 1. (Tg)

Depending on the source, can be adjusted relative to the orientation of the player’s view.

Inputs also accept any vector type fat wire, using the A and B values for X and Y.

A sticks value can easily be converted into being one of 8 directions. (Tg) Or even to separate signals per direction. (Tg)
Default Value:

The magnitude of the vector; how much the stick is being pushed. (Tg)

Components:

Left/Right, Up/Down.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Signal=Wireless controller X/Y Axisthe default of Signal is combined with each Left/Right Stick component.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Player level=Wireless controller X/Y Axisthe default of Player Info is combined with each Left/Right Stick component.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Logic=Wireless controller X/Y Axisthe default of Boolean is combined with each Left/Right Stick component.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Number=Wireless controller X/Y Axisthe default of Number is combined with each Left/Right Stick component.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Paint bucket=Paint bucketthe default of Left/Right Stick is combined with each Colour component.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Four=Fourthe default of Left/Right Stick is combined with each 4 Numbers component.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Sliders=Slidersthe default of Left/Right Stick is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Three=Threeeach component is combined in order.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Rotate=Rotateeach component is combined in order.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Two=Wireless controller X/Y Axiseach component is combined in order.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Collidable=Collidabledefault of Left/Right Stick is combined with Collision impact.
Wireless controller X/Y Axis×Music=Musicdefault of Left/Right Stick is combined with Music volume.

# Music

Data about a music note. Each time a new note begins, a clip will start a new data stream through the same output.

Note that only components that have been split and are wired into while rewound will output values.

Default Value:

The volume output.

Components:
Volume:

Outputs will be between 0 and 1. Takes into account the if the note is playing and its volume as set in the piano roll or as performed using R2, but not the volume of the output the note produced.

Button:

An integer between 0 and 7 representing the button (including face buttons and d-pad buttons) that were used to perform the note. When a note is added or moved while the instrument is in “row mapping” mode (eg. for percussion instruments), the button value of that note is set.

When new notes are drawn on the piano roll their button is set by the order they were added. So the third note draw will have the button index 2 (the third value).

The order of the buttons is the same as playing notes with a piano-style instrument in performance mode. It’s also the same as the order of the buttons while looking at a row-mapped instrument’s piano roll, the values go up from the bottom.

The order is as follows:

Value

Button

0

Cross button

1

Square button

2

Triangle button

3

Circle button

4

Down button

5

Left button

6

Up button

7

Right button

Note:

A number representing the note itself. Middle C (C4) is 0. Each semitone is 1/12 (0.0833...) above or below the previous. And an octave will be 1 above or below the previous.

Spiciness:

The “spicy” setting of the note over time.

Imp Position X Axis:

The X position (left/right) of the note over time within the performance window. From -1 at the left edge to 1 at the right edge.

Imp Position Y Axis:

The Y position (up/down) of the note over time within the performance window. From -1 at the bottom edge to 1 at the top edge.

Note ID:

The index of note based on the order it was originally created.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Music×Paint bucket=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Music×Eight=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Music×Four=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Music×Three=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Music×Two=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Music×Sliders=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Music×Rotate=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Music×Player level=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Music×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Music×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Musicdefault of Left/Right Stick is combined with Music volume.
Music×Logic=Musicdefault of Boolean is combined with Music volume.
Music×Signal=Musicdefault of Signal is combined with Music volume.
Music×Collidable=Musicspread components of Collision are combined with components of Music, in order. For example, Collision position X is combined with Music volume, Collision position Y is combined with Music button, etc.

# Player Info

A signal for each player.

Default Value:

The player value that has the largest magnitude (furthest away from zero, positive or negative).

Components:
Positive:

The default value’s positive magnitude. Signal

Negative:

The default value’s negative magnitude. Signal

Not Player Owned:

No specific player was tied to this signal. For the purposes of finding the default value, this is counted as a player value.

Player 1:

Player 1’s value for this signal.

Player 2:

Player 2’s value for this signal.

Player 3:

Player 3’s value for this signal.

Player 4:

Player 4’s value for this signal.

Controller Colour:

The Colour of the lightbars of all involved players, averaged. White if no players were tied to the signal.

Combination Rules

When wired into the same input as another wire type, they are combined using the following rules:

Player level×Signal=Player levelthe default of Signal is combined with each Player Info component.
Player level×Logic=Player levelthe default of Boolean is combined with each Player Info component.
Player level×Number=Player levelthe default of Number is combined with each Player Info component.
Player level×Paint bucket=Paint bucketthe value of Colour is combined with Player Info controller colour.
Player level×Four=Four(default?) of Player Info combined with each component of 4 Numbers.
Player level×Three=Three(default?) of Player Info combined with each component of 3 Numbers.
Player level×Two=Two(default?) of Player Info combined with each component of 2 Numbers.
Player level×Music=Musiceach component is combined in order.
Player level×Wireless controller X/Y Axis=Wireless controller X/Y Axisthe default of Player Info is combined with each Left/Right Stick component.
Player level×Sliders=Slidersthe default of Player Info is combined with each Spice & Randomisation component.
Player level×Rotate=Rotatethe default of Player Info is combined with each Rotation component.
Player level×Eight=Eighteach component is combined in order.
Player level×Mover=Movervalue of Transform scale is combined with 1. Other values are ignored.
Player level×Collidable=Collidabledefault of Player Info is combined with Collision impact.

# Setting Types

Contents:

This section explains the various setting types, how they can be interacted with, and other details particular to that setting type.

A setting can be manipulated with using Cross button.

Most numerical settings can be set by typing numbers in, by using shift +Square button.

Pressing Triangle button on a setting will revert it to the default value or state.

When the object being tweaked is selected and other objects of the same type are also selected, changing settings in that tweak menu will update the same setting in all selected objects.

Similarly, changing the name of one object will update the name of all objects regardless of their type.

Some settings such as name fields and numerical sliders can have their values adjusted one notch at a time. Using the Dualshock/Dualsense controller, use Up button and Down button. Using the moves, use secondary Square button and Triangle button.

Note that all setting outputs from a gadget are multiplied by the power they are receiving (from 0 to 1). So even a switch, powered by a 50% signal will output half of whatever value it would normally send. (Tg)

A wire can be routed out of a setting and into the same setting. When an external wire is attached and the “overwrite” blend mode is used on the input, the value furthest from 0 will be kept. So if a value is sent externally into this setting and then the wire is removed or sends 0 soon after, and the original setting value was 0, the value that was sent in externally will be preserved—looping out and back into the same setting. (Tg)

This can make it very easy to preserve a value within an emitted object.

# Slider

A simple slider with a single associated value you can drag with Cross button. Drag left to decrease the value, or right to increase the value. Press up/down on the dpad to increment or decrement the value.

Most slider settings range from -9999999 to 9999999 in increments of 0.1.

Note that distance measurements are displayed as in-scene meters. However, this is after converting from the internal value and taking into account the scale of the gadget. As such, scaling a gadget may change the displayed value.
To set the value in meters by sending a number through a wire regardless of what scale it may be at currently, the Modulate wire blend mode can be used. (Tg)
Similarly, rotations use a different internal value to the degrees per second that is displayed. The same solution also works in that case. (Tg)

Has an input and an output.

Note that for percentage sliders, an input of 1 will set the setting to 100%, and an output of 1 means the setting is at 100%.

# Slider with Output

A slider that has an output but no input.

# Slider Set

Multiple sliders pertaining to a single setting. Direct setting is not possible with these slider sets.

The number of sliders can vary depending on other settings within the gadget, and the wire type that can be received or sent will by a number type allowing the same count of inputs.

For example, while there are 3 sliders showing, a 3 Numbers fat wire can be used to set it, and a 3 Numbers fat wire will be sent from its output.

# Switch

A switch. Click with Cross button to toggle on or off.

While receiving a signal, the switch will be on.

Has an input and output.

# Switch with Input

A switch, with an input only.

# Switch with Output

A switch , with an output only.

# Selector

An array of multiple switches, only one of which may be on at any given time. Select an option to turn it on and turn off the previously selected option.

# Colour

Use Cross button to manipulate the colour. Has a colour wheel through the spectrum of hues around the outside, and a triangle in the centre.

One side of the triangle represents the brightness from black to white. Another side of the triangle represents the saturation (intensity) of the hue.

Receives and sends Colour values.

# Detected Name

A single-line text input that should contain the name of an object within the scene.

Use Cross button on the box to directly type in the name.

Use the incrementing controls to cycle through all applicable names in the scene and applicable names that other gadgets look for. Note that changing the value using this method will not carry across other selected objects.

# Switch with Slider

Uses a switch to toggle the entire setting on or off. While on, the accompanying slider sets the setting itself.

# Graph

A 2D representation of the settings, possibly with nodes that can be manipulated within the display.

# ADSR Graph

A graph with 4 nodes. For nodes representing time, 0 is no time and 1 is the maximum, matching the full width of the graph interface.

I/O is a Spice & Randomisation fat wire, but the values map in this way:

Attack

time taken to increase to full volume. Value: 0-1.

Decay

time taken after reaching full volume to decrease to the sustain volume. Value: 0-1.

Sustain

the sustain volume. Value: 0-1, representing no volume to full volume.

Release

time taken to decrease to no volume after the note is released. Value: 0-1.

# Graph with a Node

Effectively 2 sliders combined into one 2D graph and a single node to adjust both settings at once. Move the node with Cross button. While moving a node, a random range or spicy setting can be added just as with a split slider.

Has 2 inputs and outputs, one for the setting tied to the Cross button position, and one for the setting tied to the Y position of the node. For sound settings, these will be Spice & Randomisation. Otherwise they will be Number values.

Hovering over the top half of the graph is equivalent to hovering over the first hidden slider. This includes the tooltip and the “adjust value” controls.

# Input

An input-only setting that receives some value.

# Object Input

An input wire that may connect to any number of objects within the scene to be affected by. (Tg)

Surface-snapping a gadget with this type of input by holding shift while moving or stamping it will add a wire from that object to this input. While surface-snapped to an object it affects, such wires are hidden from view.

When inside a chip that has an associated Affected Object, gadgets with this type of input will also use that object.

# Trigger Input

An input-only setting that will trigger some behaviour when its input signal goes from non-positive to positive. (Tg)

This is checked after blending the input wires, so for multiple wires to be able to trigger something it’s best to use a Signal Manipulator to turn a signal into a pulse, leaving the input at 0 after the trigger has been sent. (Tg)

# Output

An output-only setting that sends some value.

# Object Output

An output wire that may connect to an object within the scene to affect. (Tg)

Surface-snapping a gadget with this type of output by holding shift while moving or stamping it will add a wire from this output to that object. While surface-snapped to an object it affects, such wires are hidden from view.

When inside a chip that has an associated Affected Object, gadgets with this type of output will also use that object.

# Pulse Output

An output-only setting that will send a pulse (a 1 value for one frame only) at some event.

Most pulse outputs send a Boolean value.

# Editor Mode Button

A button that only does something while in edit mode. This is not a setting, but tends to be used for testing the gadget.

# Signal Input and Output

Receives a value, and sends a value from the same setting—often with the value having been manipulated in some way.

# Signal Input and Output with Button

Outputs the current state of the button. Can be set by an input wire, or keyframed. The higher of that value or the normal controller sensor output is sent during play.

While being hold with Cross button in edit mode, overrides the outputs a signal to represent the state being set.

# Signal Input and Output with Slider

Similar to the Button version, but is a slider.

# Text

A multi-line text setting. Use Cross button on it to type in text.

Text inputs can also take dreams icons in the form <icon-name>, as well as emoji in the form of :emoji-name:.

# Pair of Range Sliders

Two sliders which set the range of the same setting. The minimum setting will push the maximum setting up if moved beyond it. And the maximum setting will push the minimum setting down if moved beyond it.

A button. After clicking on it with Cross button, a glowing dashed line will lead to the imp tip. Click Cross button on an object within the scene to link the gadget to that object.

# Dreamiverse Creation

Click Cross button on this setting to search the dreamiverse for an element.

# Switch with Text

A switch that enables the setting, with an accompanying text input.

# Switch with no Input

A switch with no input to set it. Such switches can often still be set using a keyframe.

# Many Outputs

Multiple outputs that have the same behaviour. The number of active outputs is often dictated by a second “Number of Ports” setting.

The next highest port will be shown when:

If a wire is then connected to that port, the Number of Ports setting will increase to accommodate this. However, if all wires are removed from the highest allowed port, the Number of Ports setting will not decrease.

When placing a wire and holding shift to clone it, if there are no wires connected to lower ports the new held wire will come from the next port down.

# Many Inputs

Multiple inputs that are all used by the gadget the same way.

# Many Inputs and Outputs

Many channels, each with their own inputs and outputs.

# Switch with Detected Name

A switch that turns on the setting. When on, the set name to detect is used to affect the gadget’s behaviour.

# Image Slider

A slider that works similarly to the slider. An image slider chooses from multiple discrete settings—much like a selector but in a slider format.

The slider’s handle changes icon as the setting is changed to represent the currently selected image.

# Audio Slice Graph

A visual representation of an audio slice of the sound gadget. By dragging Cross button, the start point of the slice can be changed.

If holding shift while changing the start point, the setting widens such that a range of the slice can be set. If so, each time the setting is checked, a random point within the range is used—much like a split slider.

# Split Slider

Similar to a slider. If shift is held while changing the value, the slider will split in two, allowing a range to be set.

Each time the setting is checked, a random value within that range will be used. And a vertical line is shown for the actual value used on the slider. (Tg)

Hold L2 while setting to set a spicy value, which can be used while notes are performed depending on their spicyness.

Has a Spice & Randomisation input and output.

# Label List

A list of individual Switches, one for each label:

Heart Friend
Skull Foe
Skybox Scenery
Prop Object
Machine Machine
Blast Weapon
Rocket Missile
Target Target
No entry Unlabelled: Refers to objects with no label set.

# Creation Types

There are four types of creation: Dream, Scene, Element, Collection.

# Dream

Dreams are rectangular. They contain scenes or other dreams. (Tg) These can be linked together by plugging wires into doorway nodes of different scenes. If there is more than one scene that could be seen within the dream map, a map button is shown on the dream’s cover page.

When playing a new scene within a dream, it is stored as the last scene the player visited. The doorway they entered through is also stored. If they leave the dream and come back, they will start at this scene, entering through the doorway they used to get there before. The object that was auto-possessed when they entered will not be restored, but the doorway will become the checkpoint if that setting is turned on.

When leaving a scene that stores a persistent variable, that variable’s current value is stored and can be accessed by other scenes. If the player leaves the dream and comes back, that value will still be stored and can be accessed by scenes.

If a player has played the dream before, a red reset button is shown on the dream’s cover page. If they click this and confirm, all data about their playthrough will be deleted—including persistent variables and which scenes they’ve played and which was the last one they played.

When a scene is within a dream, the current values of any variables marked “persistent” will be saved before leaving that scene. And if the dream is in the dreamiverse—whether private, public (remixable), or playable—scoreboards will keep a record of all posted scores coming from any scenes within it.

They cannot be remixable.

# Nesting Dreams

Dreams can be nested up to 4 deep—including the top-level dream. Only 50 dream creations can be contained within another dream.

When exiting a normal nested dream, the player will be sent along the wire link to whatever other scene or dream is connected in the map. If the doorway is not connected to another scene or dream, they will exit the dream entirely, they will be left in the map of the first nested dream the visited (or cover if the map isn’t available to them).

If the dream is a “dream within a dream,” the player will instead be taken to the cover of the top-level dream.

# Map

Note: What happens if no wires come from an entrance to a scene/dream? random. What happens if no wire comes from a scene when you exit it through a doorway? kicked from the dream “Selected X items”

Scenes and dreams will appear as thumbnails. Hovering over these thumbnails will show a tooltip with the name of that creation and its owner.

Dreams can contain a maximum of 100 scenes or dreams. This number cannot exceed 50 dreams. Only 400 scenes are allowed—including all scenes contained within the dream map, and all scenes within contained dreams.

If a scene is added and it is the only scene in the dream, a wire is taken from the dream’s entrance doorway into that scene. (Tg)

Use Triangle button to remove a scene or dream. Use Cross button to add a single scene or dream to the selection, and use Circle button to cancel the selection. Use R2 to drag them around. If dragging a selected scene or dream, all selected scenes and dreams will also be dragged.

Doorway nodes can be connected using wires. Hovering over a node will show the name of the corresponding doorway gadget or node. Tweaking one of the dream’s doorways on the outside edge of the screen will edit the name of that doorway node.

To take a wire from one doorway, use Cross button or R2 on a doorway node. To plug the wire into another doorway, use Cross button or R2 on the target doorway. (Tg)

If wiring from an exit, it can only connect to entrance or two-way doorways. If wiring from an entrance, it can only connect to exit or two-way doorways. If wiring from a two-way doorway, it can be connected to any kind of doorway. (See Doorways.)

When wiring into a doorway on the edge of the dream, it will change to fit the match the source of the wire.

For example, wiring an exit into the dream’s doorway will turn the dream’s doorway into an exit.

Use Triangle button on a wire or doorway to remove it.

The edge outline will adjust to fit as objects are added, removed, and moves around the map.

If no entrance doorways in the dream connect to a scene/dream, the player will start in a random scene/dream within the map.

Searches for scenes or dreams you own, are a collaborator on, or are remixable. Doorways will be shown as nodes on the edge of the thumbnails. Select one to add it to the dream map.

If no entrance doorway exists inside the scene or dream, one will be added. If no wires connect to the dream map’s entrance node, one will be added going from it to the newly added scene or dream.

# Tools

Tools to edit the dream map.

This is a menu with the following items:

# Move

Controller: R2, Moves: primary T button.

Drag scenes, dreams, scribbles, and notes around. Can also tilt the controller to rotate the held object.

# Clone

Shortcut: shift +R2.

Make a copy of a scene, dream, scribble, note, or doorway of the dream.

# Tweak

Shortcut: shift +Square button.

Tweak the settings of a scene or dream, the text of a note, or the name of a doorway of the dream.

# Delete

Shortcut: Triangle button.

Use R2 on an object or wire to delete it.

# Scribble:

Use R2 to draw a glowing, slightly transparent line.

Pull the trigger lightly to make a thinner line and harder to make a thicker line.

Hold shift to adjust the range of thicknesses so the line can be thicker while using R2.

Draw with Cross button to use the medium thickness—the thickest line you get without holding shift.

# Change Colour or Font:

Use R2 or Cross button on a scribble to change its colour.

Use on a note to change its colour and font.

# Add Note:

Click anywhere to add a new piece of text and begin editing it. This text will use the selected Colour and Font.

Tweak a note to edit its text. Use the Change Colour or Font tool to change its colour or font.

# Doorway:

Adds a doorway to the outer edge of the dream. Once linked to a scene or dream with a wire, it becomes the same type as that doorway.

These can then be named by tweaking them, and moved around the edge and cloned.

# Colours

A list of 10 colours, used by scribble and notes. The colours are as follows:

Used when Scribbling or using the Change Colour or Font tool.

# Fonts

A menu of all fonts in the game.

Used when adding a new Note or using the Change Colour or Font tool.

# Background

Allows you to select a photo to use as a background for the map view.

Note, once a background image has been selected it cannot be removed; only replaced with a different background image.

The opacity of the image can be adjusted using Background Opacity.

# Background Opacity

How opaque the background image is.

# Clear Scribbles

After confirming, deletes all scribbles.

# Update

Displays the number of contained scenes or dreams that have a later version that any contained by this dream.

Contained scenes and dreams will use the version that was imported. Use this to update the references to different versions, much like the Update Mode while editing a scene or element. (Tg)

# Edit Contained Scene or Dream

Use shift + Square button on a scene or dream to adjust its settings.

# Lock Mode

There are 4 lock modes, and these affect how scenes are shown and how they can be interacted with within the dream’s map.

A scene has a locked state and a visibility state. When unlocked, the scene can be clicked on in the map view to get to its cover page. When locked, the scene cannot be clicked on but is visible. When visible, a scene can be seen within the map view. When invisible, it cannot.

Unlocked Initially

always seen, always clickable.

Locked Initially

always seen, clickable only if the player has played that scene through the dream.

Invisible Until Discovered

seen only if the player has played that scene through the dream.

Always Invisible

never seen.

# Assign Scoreboards

A list of all scoreboards the dream has, each with checkboxes next to them (off by default).

When a scoreboard has been assigned to one or more scenes but none of those scenes are visible to the player, that scoreboard will also be hidden from the player.

# Persistent Variables

When inside a dream, scenes can store values in persistent variables between playthroughs and between scenes.

If a dream is inside another dream it will share the parent’s persistent variables, unless “Dream within a Dream” is turned on for that sub-dream.

# Scoreboards

Note: Does changing the multiplayer option reset the board? Is it a bug? Check multiplayer explanation.

When uploaded to the dreamiverse, a dream can display scoreboards from the cover page and scores can be posted from scenes within the dream. (Jj) (See the Score and Score Modifier gadgets.)

If you own the dream, you can edit the scoreboards to tell Dreams what kind of scoreboard it is. Click on the scoreboards icon on the cover page, scroll over to the scoreboard you want to edit, and then click on the pencil button on the top-right. (Jj)

Here you can set a number of options:

Score Unit

has two options. “Number” will display the score as a number. “Time” will display the number as a time, with the integer part of the score representing one second.

Better score is…

has two options. “Higher” will sort the scores highest-first. “Lower” will sort the scores lowest-first.

Multiplayer Boards

has two options. This option is used when there have been scores posted for that number of players to that scoreboard, without the “multiplayer” option turned on for that score gadget.

  • “Separate” will show a dropdown to select the player count of the scores to show (so if “2 Player” is selected, only 2 player scores will be shown).
  • “Combined” will display all such scores in the same view, with no dropdown to filter them. Note that changing this option will reset all scores.

# Dream within a Dream

When this setting is turned on for a dream contained within a parent dream, when the player is sent to the sub-dream via a wire it will be as if they exited and went to that dream directly. (Tg)

Any scores and variables will use and save to that dream and not the parent dream.

When exiting that sub-dream, the entire dream will be exited.

# Scene

Scenes are circular. They contain external elements, and things created directly inside the scene. All scenes have an entrance by default. They can also have doorway gadgets that will show up as nodes when linking scenes in a dream. (Tg)

They may be remixable.

# Element

Elements are hexagonal. They are individual creations that people can bring into other creations. They may contain external elements. (Tg)

They are always remixable.

Making an element with interactive elements can make developing another element a lot easier to manage, avoiding having to bounce back and forth between elements and scenes to simply test if some piece of logic works. (Tg)

For example, you have a character as a separate element. You want to add logic to it so it can interact with something in the scene itself. So you can make a small test element that contains those elements from the scene, import it while working on the character, and then delete it when you’re done.

When importing an element that contains more than 1 top-level object, they will automatically be grouped. The grid-centre of the group is based on the (0, 0, 0) origin point of the element. You can see that point by turning on “floor guide.”

# Collection

Collections look like a circular dotted line with 3 thumbnails of contained creations featured. These may contain any kind of creation. (Tg)

They cannot be remixable.

# Set Collection Icon

The first 3 creations added to a collection will be shown as part of its icon. You can also set which creations are used and where by following these steps:

  1. View the collection.
  2. Click on the contained creation you want to add to the thumbnail to go to its cover page.
  3. In the top-right of the cover page click the Collection Set Collection Icon button to see a preview of the collection’s icon.
  4. Click on one of the 3 spots for that spot to use the creation’s thumbnail.

# Cover Page

Contents:

Scroll right to find further menus for the creation.

# Labelling

Labels are shown as icons on creation thumbnails. They are also shown in text above the name on the creation’s cover page. They can be set when first quick-saving, or by clicking on the text labels on the cover page with Cross button.

# Is your creation VR-friendly?

All creations will run in VR. Choosing these labels is telling the player that playing the creation in VR has been tested and ensured to be fun, not just playable. Please set creations to VR-compatible or above only if playing them is a good experience in VR.

Not Sure

Visible to all.

TV Only

Only visible to non-VR players by default.

VR Compatible

Visible to all players. Cannot be chosen if the creation has not been played in VR.

VR Only

Only visible to VR players by default. Cannot be chosen if the creation has not been played in VR.

Note, a Dream cannot be set to VR-compatible or higher if it contains scenes that are not labelled VR-compatible or higher.

# Disable Comfort Mode

Note: or collaborator?

Unavailable unless set to VR-compatible or higher.

A switch, off by default. When on, players with Comfort Mode on will see a label on the creation’s thumbnail indicating it is for experienced VR players and designed for Comfort Mode to be off.

If you are the owner or collaborator of the creation, you can still play it with comfort mode on. If you are not, then a screen will be shown:

Comfort Mode Not Applicable. This creation was designed to be played with Comfort Mode switched off. Would you like to play with Comfort Mode switched off temporarily?

And three buttons: Exit this creation. Play in Cinema Mode. Play with Comfort Mode off.

Note, this screen will be shown before each scene with “Disable Comfort Mode” turned on while playing a Dream.

# Is your creation designed for a specific controller?

Indicate to the player which controllers are required to play the creation.

Searches are not automatically filtered based on these filters.

# Customise

Set the style and look of the cover page.

# Done

Saves the changes and exits customisation.

# Fonts List

Displays a preview of the creation’s title in boxes, each using a different font. The font that is used shows a green Tick on its top-right corner.

Navigate left and right through the font list by dragging with R2 or using Left stick.

# Language Fonts

Shows options for different language types. Once selected, only fonts that support those languages will be shown in the font preview list.

If a language set is chosen that the currently selected font is in and the green tick is clicked, the previously chosen font will be saved.

The language sets are as follows:

# Randomise

Randomises font and colour.

# Colour Scheme

Shows 8 previews for the allowed colours. The selected colour will affect the buttons a player sees on the creation’s cover page, as well as the thumbnail’s outline.

Picked randomly when a creation is first saved.

A green Tick is shown on the top-right of the currently selected preview.

The colours are as follows:

# Set Background Photo

Shows a list of photos taken within Dreams. The currently selected photo has a green Tick on the top-right.

Selecting a photo and saving will copy the photo into the creation as its thumbnail.

Note that any photos taken will be removed when a creation is deleted. So when creating a temporary scene to make a nice thumbnail image, save the creation and set the cover page of the creation in question before deleting that scene.

A “Take a photo...” button can be clicked to launch the game straight into photo mode.

# Set Collection Icon

(Only available when accessed from a collection you own.)

Click to see a preview of the collection’s thumbnail, with three thumbnails of contained creations. Click on one of the slots to set it to use the creation’s thumbnail instead. (See Set Collection Icon.)

# Send to...

Has 4 options:

Send to a Dreamer

allows you to search for dreamers. Press Cross button on a dreamer to send the creation to them (note there is no confirmation screen). (Unavailable when the creation is not public or playable.)

Add to Another Creation

allows you to add the creation to another. Any creation can be added to a collection. Scenes and Dreams can be added to dreams. Elements can be added to scenes. (See Creation Types.)

Play Later

adds the creation to your “play later” queue. This queue can be accessed through your profile page. (Unavailable when the creation is not uploaded.)

View on Indreams.me

shows a screen displaying the indreams url for the creation. (Unavailable when the creation is not uploaded.)

# Creation Settings

Settings for this creation.

# Visibility

A tab containing related settings.

# Creation Listing Status

Unavailable:

when the creation has not been released as playable or public.

A creation can only have one of the following listing statuses:

Unlisted

means cannot be found in searches or dreamsurfing listings etc. (Tg)

Listed

means can be found in searches and dreamsurfing listings etc.

# Archive

Note: Does it ask to delete the local copy when doing this from the creation settings?

Hides the online versions of this creation in My Creations, and sets the creation to Unlisted. (Tg)

Note, local versions will still be shown in My Creations.

If this is already lit, clicking the button will restore it, undoing its Archived status and showing its online versions in My Creations. This will not make the creation Listed.

# Collaborators

Note: find add collab icon. Test to see what is required to be shown in the By list.

A list of players currently added as collaborators. The owner can use Triangle button to remove any collaborators, and a collaborator can use this to remove themselves as a collaborator. (Tg)

If no players are added as collaborators, an “Add Collaborator” button is shown. Click it with Cross button to search for players.

Use Cross button on a player’s imp to reveal a green envelope icon above them. Then click the green Tick circled in the top-right to send invitations to those players. (Tg)

This notification has an Accept and Reject button. The player must click Accept to become a collaborator on that creation.

Once they are a collaborator on a creation, it will appear in their My Creations list. When they view My Creations, creations they are collaborating on will be in a separate tab. (Tg)

Collaborators may only upload changes privately. Only the owner may publish it as playable or public.

Note, up to 10 players can be added as collaborators at any given time. The “by” list on the cover page will show those players and any players that uploaded existing versions of the creation.

# Report...

Has 3 options:

© Copyright Issues

opens a browser window direct to copyright.indreams.me. Also shows the longform ID of the creation.

Give it a Thumbs Down

will tell the system you want to see this kind of thing and content from its creator less. This is not shown in any other place, and does not affect the like count.

Report Creation

will allow you to report a creation that violates the Dreams guidelines. Click it to see which things you can report a creation for. This does not include things like theft from other creators or use of copyrighted material or intellectual property.

# Reset Progress

While playing a dream, the last played scene as well as any persistence variables are stored locally. This button will delete all data from previous plays.

# Play, View

Plays the creation.

If the creation is an element, shows as a “View” button. Otherwise shows as a “Play” button.

# View Map

In-game, this is simply dubbed “view.”

Only shown on dream creations when there is at least one visible scene.

Shows the map of scenes and dreams contained in the creation.

# Edit

Edits the creation.

# Remix

Note: What if the referenced version is later deleted?

Creates a copy of the creation, with a credit reference back to this version including its genealogy.

# Release

Gives options to release the creation as public or playable. (Tg)

# Photos, Take a photo...

A list of photos taken with this creation, and buttons to release, archive/restore, and delete the local copies of those photos. This list can be sorted and filtered.

If no photos have been taken for this creation, shows a “Take a photo...” button instead. This will play the creation Paused in Photo Mode.

# Comments

Note: expand on reporting

Shows all comments made on the creation. The name of the player who left the comment is shown above the box, and their imp is shown to the left of the box.

Comments that are too long to be shown within the box can be scrolled up and down using R2.

“Write a Comment” lets you leave a new comment. Four buttons are first shown, to let you select what type of comment you wish to leave (see below).

At the top of the screen are tabs to only show the corresponding comments. There are 4 types of comment a player can leave:

Comment/Discussion

for simple comments that do not fit the other types.

Feedback

for suggestions and feedback on the creation.

Bug

for reporting a bug experienced while playing the creation.

Review

for comments concerning the quality of the creation.

Comments have 4 buttons beneath them:

Thumb Up

will upvote the comment.

Thumb Down

will downvote the comment, and hide the contents of that comment from you (though a button can be used to temporarily show the contents again). If a comment gets enough downvotes it will be hidden for all players.

Report...

will show a screen with 3 buttons:

  • Thumb Down Comment.
  • Block User.
  • Report Comment.
Reply

will allow you to reply to that comment. The screen will change to show the comment being replied to and the normal comment box.

# Versions & Release

Note: If another person makes a version and it’s re-saved as the latest version, can you then delete the version they made and so remove them from credits? Check names of buttons.

A list of all versions made of the creation. The player who saved the version, the time it was saved, and its version notes are shown below the version’s thumbnail. (Tg)

Click on a version with Cross button for more details, edit the version notes, and manipulate the version with the following buttons:

Play/View

to play that version.

Edit this Version

to edit that version. Using this, that version can be saved again to become the latest version. (Tg)

Delete

to delete that version.

Release

to release that version as the latest version. Only available to the owner. (See Cover Page > Release.)

# Genealogy

Shows a list of other credit-linked creations along with their thumbnail, published status icon, and owner. This list is searchable, and filterable by tag and category.

Private creations are shown with no thumbnail name or owner.

There are 3 tabs:

Contents

shows creations this creation contains.

Used In

shows creations this creation is contained in.

Remixes

shows creations that are remixes of this creation. Note that elements exported from other elements/scenes are remixes of the source creation.

Click on a creation with Cross button to go to that creation’s cover page. Use shift +Cross button to go to its genealogy.

# Pause Menu

Contents:

Pause at any time using OPTIONS button. This section explains what buttons and options the pause screen has.

# Help

Information on creation types, tagging, release rights, controls, how to turn on more info and prompts, “where to start” which describes how to import assets from the dreamiverse and find the in-game tutorials, a link to indreams.me, and a word on copyright and intellectual property.

# Video Player

A searchable and filterable list of all in-game tutorials. Click on one to show the video playing in the corner of the screen while editing your creation as normal.

# Send to, Creation Settings

Shortcuts to “Send to...” and Creation Settings.

# Photo Mode

Shortcut to Photo Mode but with electronics unable to be displayed.

# Describe VR Experience Level

Available:

when VR was used to start playing.

Rate how experienced a player should be before playing this. Reveals 3 selector buttons:

1

Can be played with very little experience. Indicates little to no camera movement required to play.

2

Should be played by those with a little more experience, with caution. Indicates some camera movement.

3

Should only be played by players with a lot of experience using VR. Indicates lots of intense camera movement.

The average rating from players is shown on the cover page of the creation.

# Thumbs Up

Click this to give it a big like and a massive thumbs up.

# Play, View

Shortcut to Play or View the creation.

# Remix

Available:

when playing a remixable creation or editing a creation.

Shortcut to remix the creation.

# My Preferences

Opens the Preferences screen.

# Quick Save

Note: find save icon
Available:

when editing a creation.

Saves in the local “quick save” slot of the creation.

Note, only one quick save slot is available per creation. Any data about the previously quick saved version will be lost.

# Save Version

Available:

when editing a creation.

Saves, publishes, and uploads the creation in different ways. (Tg)

On the left side the Creation Name is shown. Also the current thumbnail (before saving) is shown.

# Search Listings

Sets the Listed Status of the creation.

# Edit Audio Preview

Note: what cateogory of element is required? What about in chips? Confirm times.
Available:

if the creation is an element.

If audio was played from the creation, a screen is shown allowing you to edit the 3 second audio preview of the creation.

“Choose a New Preview” shows a graph of the volume over time of the up to 12 seconds of audio recorded. A window is shown over this visualisation indicating which part of the recording will be used as the audio preview. Drag the window with Cross button or R2.

Click the ” Reset to Default” button to reset the window to the centre of the recording. Or, if the recording didn’t fill the 12 seconds, to the start of the recording.

Press the ” Play Preview” button next to it to preview the selected slice of recorded audio. Press the ” Listen to Current Preview” button below to listen to a previously set preview.

If no audio was played while editing the creation, a message requesting that audio be played from edit mode be done before trying again.

Click Yes to view the element and see a graph visualising the audio as it is recorded. Then pause and select Edit Audio Preview again to edit as normal.

# Save and release this version

Note: describe
Available:

when the owner of the creation. (Tg)

Uploading a creation will require any contained creations to be uploaded to at least the same degree of “publicity.” Also, if a creation to be uploaded is a remix of another creation, that other creation must be released as remixable.

Creations that must be uploaded are shown in a list, each with buttons with options for how it is to be released. When choosing to make a creation playable or public, listed status can also be chosen. (Tg)

Release as PLAYABLE

Requires all contained elements to be uploaded as private or remixable. (Tg)

Release as PUBLIC (Remixable)

Requires all contained elements to be uploaded as remixable.

If the creation contains private creations that you don’t own, a warning saying it cannot release the creation as public as it contains PRIVATE creations. Clicking on this button will show those creations.

# Save this version as PRIVATE

A private creation is uploaded to the servers, but no one can see it apart from you and any collaborators set on the creation. (Tg)

Requires all contained elements to be uploaded as private, remixable, or playable. (See Save Version.)

# Save this version to your PS4™ System

Saves a version locally. (Tg)

# Version Notes

Available:

when publishing a type has been selected.

Text saved to describe the version for later reference. (Tg)

# Categories & Tags

Available:

when publishing a type has been selected.

At the top of the screen the category is selected. A subcategory may optionally also be selected. The categories and sub-categories are as follows:

Game

Single Player, Multiplayer.

Audio-Visual

Feature, Short, Visual Novel, Music.

Showcase

Gallery (for showing art), Expo (for showing interactive objects), and Set (for showing props).

Across the bottom of the screen, tags can be selected and added.

There are many built-in tags shown by default, which are automatically translated for players using different language settings on their PS4. The built-in tags are the following:

Abstract, Action, Adventure, Air, Alien, Ambient, Animal, Art Deco, Art Nouveau, Asset Creation, Baroque, Bathroom, Bed, Bedroom, Black, Blue, Blues, Boat, Brawler, Brown, Building, Calculator, Car, Cartoon, Chillout, Cinematic, City, Classical, Classicism, Cold, Colourful, Combiner, Comedy, Controller Sensor, Country, Countryside, Cute, Cutscene, Cyan, Dance, Dialogue Text Displayer, Doorway, Drama, Draw Notes, Drum ’n’ Bass, Electronic, Emitter, Exclusive Gate, Expressionist, Fantasy, Fighting, First person, Flower, Fog, folk, Four-Legged, Funk, furniture, Futuristic, Galaxy, Garden, Goth, Gothic Art, Grab Sensor, Grade & Effects, Grass, Green, Grey, Gyroscope, Hand-Drawn, Heavy Metal, Hip-Hop, Historical, Horror, Hot, House, Human, Ice, Imp, Impressionist, Indigo, Instrument, island, Jazz, Kitchen, Level Assembly, Level Design, Light, Lighting, Living Room, Lounge, Magenta, Modern, Monochrome, Musical, Mystery, Nature, Noir, Office, Orange, Outer Space, Party, Path, Perform, Piano roll, Pink, Pixel, Planet, Plant, Platform, Pop, Pop Art, Prize Bubble, Prop, Psychedelic, Puppetry, Purple, Puzzle, R & B, Racing, Realism, Red, Reggae, Road, Robot, Rock, Romance, Room, Rotator, RPG (Role Playing Game), Satire, Science Fiction, Score, Score Modifier, Sea, Selector, Shooter, Simulation, Skyscraper, Space, Spaceship, Splitter, Sport, Stairs, Stealth, Still Life,Stone, Stop Motion, Strategy, Street, Street Art, Sun & Sky, Superhero, Supernatural, Surreal, Surrealism, Survival, Synth, Tag, Tank, Techno, Text Displayer, Third person, Thriller, Town, Train, Truck, Typography, Underground, Universe, Village, Violet, Wall, Water, Weapon, Weird, Western, Whimsical, White, Wind, Window, Wood, World, Yellow.

Click “Add Tags” to choose from tags you have added to creations before. From there, click “Create a Tag” to create a new tag and automatically select it.

# Rewind

Rewinds the current scene and resumes playing.

# Exit

Exit from the creation.

If there are unsaved changes for the creation, you are asked if you would like to “Save this creation before leaving?” You can select from the following options:

Don’t Save

to exit without saving.

Back

to not exit.

Save

to quick save and exit.

# Back to Play Mode

Available:

when looking at the dream map while paused.

Resumes playing the scene you paused at.

# Back to Edit Mode

Resume editing the creation.

# Main Menu

Regardless of where you are, always takes you to the main menu in your homespace.

# Preferences

Contents:

All preference settings for Dreams.

# Controls

# Control Scheme

# Control Scheme

How to control the view and imp when using the Dualshock 4 or Dualsense controller. Right stick changes the angle of the view left, right, up, or down.

Motion Sensor Function

uses the controller’s gyroscope sensor to move the imp on-screen. Freeroam camera controls are used.

Left & Right Sticks

uses Left stick to move the imp. Attempting to move the imp further than the edge of the screen will pan the view in that direction.

Holding shift and using Left stick will pan the view left or right, or move forwards or backwards relative to the current view angle.

Holding shift and pushing Right stick up or down will pan the view up or down relative to the current view angle.

# Imp Sensitivity

Unavailable:

when not in Motion Sensor Function mode.

How quickly the imp moves across the screen when tilting the controller.

# Imp Speed

Unavailable:

when not in Left & Right Sticks mode.

How quickly the imp moves across the screen when pushing the left stick.

# Imp Acceleration

Unavailable:

when not in Left & Right Sticks mode.

How quickly the imp gets to full speed when pushing the left stick.

# Vibration Strength

How strong the vibration/rumble features of any creation will be.

# Toggles Instead of Holds

When on, actions that normally require holding a button or trigger will instead be turned on by pressing that button once. Then to turn off that action, press that button again.

# Handedness

When using the move controllers, the primary move controller is used to do most actions, with the secondary move controller tweaking settings and bringing up the menu.

The hand holding the controller affects certain things such as the side the menu flips out on.

Left

will assume the primary controller is being held in the left hand and the secondary controller being held in the right hand.

Right

will assume the primary controller is being held in the right hand and the secondary controller being held in the left hand.

# Camera

# Invert Camera Y

When off, pushing up on Right stick will look up and move the camera down relative to the centre of its orbit.

When on, pushing up on Right stick will look down and move the camera up relative to the centre of its orbit.

# 3rd Person Camera Speed

How fast the camera orbits around the central focus point when pushing on Right stick.

# DreamShaping Camera Speed

How fast the camera moves in free roam mode while editing a creation.

# Display

# Visuals

# Screen Shake

How much the screen can shake from the use of a Screen Shaker gadget.

# Motion Blur

How much objects will be allowed to blur when moving at speed.

# Enable UI Effects

When on, Dreams menus have effects applied to them giving them movement and colour.

When off, Dreams menus have such effects reduced or turned off entirely.

# Show Watermark

How opaque the Made in Dreams watermark in the bottom-right corner of the screen is.

# Prompts

# Show Prompts

When on, prompts are shown next to the imps depending on the situation and what is being hovered over.

When off, such prompts are hidden.

# Show More Info

When on, shows more info about settings and buttons after hovering over them for some time.

# Adjust More Info Timing: Tweak Menu & Dreamiverse Buttons

Note: what is a dreamiverse button?
Unavailable:

when Show More Info is off.

How long a setting or dreamiverse button must be hovered over before its More Info box appears.

# Adjust More Info Timing: Create Menu Buttons

Unavailable:

when Show More Info is off.

How long a create menu button must be hovered over before its More Info box appears.

# Release Prompts

When on and you release a scene, a reminder that a scene must be added to a dream to appear in Dreamsurfing will be shown, with buttons to automatically make a new dream and add the scene to it.

# Re-Centre Imp Reminder

Note: how long before the prompt is shown?

When on and the imp is left at the edge of the screen for a certain amount of time, a reminder of how to re-centre the imp is shown.

# Audio

# Volume

# Music Volume

Note: which channels?

The volume of audio on the Music channel.

Note, this channel will automatically be set to 0 while playing music in another app on the PlayStation. For example, using the Spotify app.

# Sound Effects Volume

Note: which channels?

The volume of audio on the sound effects channels.

# Voiceover Volume

Note: which channels?

The volume of audio on the Voice channel.

# Enable UI Sounds

When on, user interface sounds will play in create mode when hovering, activating settings, tools, modes, etc.

# Subtitles

# Show Subtitles

When on, Subtitle Displayers will be rendered. Also a preview of how subtitles will look is displayed at the bottom of the screen.

# Subtitle Size

Unavailable:

when Show Subtitles is off.

The size of subtitles when shown. The available sizes are:

# Subtitle Text Colour

Unavailable:

when Show Subtitles is off.

Choose which colour subtitle text will display using.

White (default), black, red, orange, yellow, green, light blue, dark blue, purple, pink, light pink.

# Subtitle Background Colour

Unavailable:

when Show Subtitles is off.

Choose which colour will be shown behind subtitle text for contrast.

Uses the same colours as Subtitle Text Colour. Defaults to black.

# Subtitle Background Opacity Colour

Unavailable:

when Show Subtitles is off.

A slider for how opaque the background will be behind the text. Defaults to fully opaque.

# VR Subtitle Position

Unavailable:

when Show Subtitles is off.

A slider for how far below centre the subtitles should appear.

# Dreamshaping

# UI

User Interface settings.

# UI Size

The size of menus and icons in edit mode. The sizes are as follows:

# Visual Feedback

Note: What changes does this make for mode changes?

How much visual feedback is used to indicate what scope you are in while editing a creation.

# Menu Position (Wireless Controller)

Where the menu will appear when using the Dualshock 4 controller.

Top

places the menu at the top of the screen, with sub menus appearing below.

Bottom

places the menu at the bottom of the screen, with sub menus appearing above.

# Show Floor Guide

When on and you enter edit mode, the floor guide will be on by default.

When off, the floor guide will be off by default.

# Tools

# Default Sculpt Mode Tool

Which sculpt tool will be equipped when entering Sculpt Mode. The available default tools are as follows:

# Social

# Streaming Camera Position

The corner that the camera feed will be shown in while streaming. Click on the preview with Cross button to cycle through the following options:

# Visible on Indreams.me

When on, your creations and profile will be shown on indreams.me.

# Visible in Promotional Materials and on our Live Streams

When on, your permission is given for your PSN ID to be used in promotional materials and on Media Molecule live streams.

# Blocked Players

Click the button with Cross button to see a searchable, filterable list of Dreams players that you have currently blocked. These players cannot access your profile or creations, and their comments and creations are hidden from you.

# VR

Settings for playing with the PlayStation Virtual Reality headset.

# Comfort

Settings to make it easier for people to use VR if they suffer from motion/acceleration sickness.

# Comfort Mode

When on and using VR while the camera is moving within the game, your view will not change until the camera has become stationary. Then you will teleport to the new location using the Camera Transition Style below.

Games will be told if this setting is on also, so that creators can take steps to cater to players who have this setting on.

# Camera Transition Style

Unavailable:

when comfort mode is off.

How the screen will transition between views. Choose between:

Instant

will switch to the new view with no transition.

Fade

will fade to black and then fade to the new view, with a 1 second transition.

# Comfort Vignette Strength

When the view is being moved by something other than the player’s head, a black vignette is shown around the edges of the screen to make the faster motion of the scene flying past less noticeable, which helps some to not get queasy as the camera moves.

# DreamShaping Menu Distance

How far away menus and other UI will appear in edit mode, while using VR. For example, the thermometer readout.

The options are: “Near,” “Middle,” and “Far.”

# Allow Low Frame Rate in VR

At times a warning will be shown asking if you want to continue in “cinema mode” (a flat 2D screen shown in 3D space) to make the experience more comfortable, or exit entirely.

When off, if a scene dips below Mm’s minimum framerate standards the same screen will be shown.

When on, the screen will be shown only if the scene dips below 30 frames per second.

# Static Sky

When on and in edit mode, the sky will rotate in yaw (looking left/right) and not pitch up/down or roll sideways.

Good for moving around using the move controllers if you suffer from acceleration sickness.

# Dreamiverse

Settings for browsing content as regards VR.

# Hide Non-VR Content When in VR

When on and using VR, hide content not marked as suitable for VR.

# Hide VR Content When Not in VR

When on and not using VR, hide content marked as only suitable for VR.

# Dreamiverse Screen Size

How large the Dreamiverse screens appear while using VR.

The options are: “Small,” “Medium,” and “Large.”

# View Credits

Roll the credits for the dream that is, Dreams!

# Tutorials

Contents:

When you haven’t played Dreams yet, the introduction walks you through using your imp and the basic camera controls.

To find more tutorials, go to Dream Shaping > Dream Workshop.

# VR How To... Videos

Brief videos showing the capabilities of the new VR-related creation features.

# 10 Top Tips: Creating VR Dreams

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Use the Head/Camera Tracker

Experience Level: intermediate.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

(See Gadget > Head/Camera Tracker.)

# How To... Create 3D Audio in VR

Experience Level: intermediate.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Use the Hand/Imp Tracker

Experience Level: intermediate.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

(See Gadget > Hand/Imp Tracker.)

# Start Dreaming

How to use the Dualshock 4 and its basic controls.

There are also equivalent tutorials for using the moves.

# Part 1 of 4

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Find Connie’s first clue
  2. Move to the second island
  3. Assemble the rocket
  4. Make sure the rocket cone is straight
  5. Find the clue on the third island
  6. Find the final clue
  7. Follow the arrow to the final island
  8. Get Connie to the exit

Basics of edit mode, moving around.

# Part 2 of 4

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Get Connie across the first gap in play mode
  2. Grabbing and moving
  3. Get Connie across the first gap
  4. Rotate the second platform into place
  5. Realign the second platform
  6. Resize the third platform to get Connie to the flag
  7. Escape the scene

Moving, scaling, and rotating objects.

# Part 3 of 4

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Use the clone tool to build a bridge
  2. Flip the arch to complete the bridge
  3. Create a staircase by repeating clone-from-clone
  4. Recreate the staircase by repeating clone-to-clone

Flipping, cloning, and multi-cloning objects.

# Part 4 of 4

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Use repeat clone to cross the first gap
  2. Use select to help widen the bridge
  3. Group and clone the blocks to the next gap
  4. Scope into, and edit the bridge group
  5. Get Connie and Cuthbert to the door

Selecting objects, creating groups, scoping in and out of groups.

# Part 1 of 4 (Left & Right Sticks)

A version of Start Dreaming Part 1 of 4 for the sticks control scheme.

# Start Dreaming (Motion Controllers)

A version of Start Dreaming for the move controllers.

# Part 1 of 4

Experience Level: beginner.

# Part 2 of 4

Experience Level: beginner.

# Part 3 of 4

Experience Level: beginner.

# Part 4 of 4

Experience Level: beginner.

# Art Tutorials

# Coat, Style & Effects

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Use the Tint Tool to colour the scene
  2. Use Looseness to add texture
  3. Use Finished to make the river reflective
  4. Use the Flow and Comb Tools to add movement to the river
  5. Use Fleck, Impasto and Ruffle to add texture and dimension
  6. Make the cottage feel warm and welcoming
  7. Use Show/Hide to view your changes

# Lighting & Atmosphere

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Setting the Scene
  2. Sun and Sky
  3. Tweak the sun settings
  4. Tweaking the Sky
  5. Studio Lighting
  6. Light Gadgets
  7. Tweaking Lights
  8. Using Fog Gadgets
  9. Tweaking Fog
  10. Grade and Effects

# Sculpting

Experience Level: advanced.

  1. Use Smear Shape to create a bridge
  2. Use the Move Tool to clone or rotate your sculptures
  3. Use Spraypaint to colour your sculpture
  4. Use Subtract to cut into your sculpture and cross the first gap
  5. Use Grid Snap to make a neat bridge
  6. Use Mirror guide to make a symmetrical sculpture
  7. Build a final bridge
  8. Use blending to customise your bridge

# Sculpting (Motion Controllers)

Experience Level: advanced.

# Painting

Experience Level: advanced.

  1. Practise painting with the Brush Flecks Tool
  2. Paint a leaf using the Brush Flecks Tool
  3. Paint a stalk using the Draw Flecks Tool
  4. Make petals using the Stamp Fleck Tool and Kaleidoscope
  5. Make more flowers using Group and Clone
  6. Create new blooms using the Fleck Editor
  7. Make a raindrop path using the Rule Flecks Tool
  8. Tweak the stroke to change the look of the raindrop
  9. Use the Duplicates page to make a downpour

# Logic Tutorials

Basics of logic.

# Wiring and Logic

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Learn how logic works in Dreams
  2. Connect gadgets together using wires
  3. Connect multiple gadgets with cloning
  4. Make a trigger zone permanent using a counter
  5. Add a timer to make things challenging
  6. Wire gadgets to reset the logic
  7. Tweak the setting of the gadgets

Trigger zones, microchips, counters, and timers.

# Health, Destroyer and Checkpoints

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Add a Health Modifier to your scene
  2. Tweak the health modifier to make a damage zone
  3. Add a checkpoint to your scene
  4. Attach a health manager to the block
  5. Tweak the health manager cooldown
  6. Connect the health manager to a destroyer
  7. Use a number displayer to show a value
  8. Using a health modifier to create a healing zone

# Scoring, Timers & Prize Bubbles

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Score Gadget
  2. Tweaking Score Gadgets
  3. Use a Number Displayer to show the Score
  4. Change the appearance of the Number Displayer text
  5. Add a Prize Bubble and a Score Modifier to the scene
  6. Use a Score Modifier to add to the total score
  7. Connect the Prize Bubble and Score Modifier to create a scoring collectable
  8. Set up a Score to record fastest times
  9. Add a Timer to the scene to record fastest times
  10. Change the Timer Type to Speed
  11. Post the current time as a score

Timers, Counters for modes, Scores and Score Modifiers.

# Selectors & Exclusive Gates

Experience Level: advanced.

  1. Using Selectors
  2. Connecting Selectors
  3. Exclusive Gates
  4. Connecting Exclusive Gates
  5. Learn how Exclusive Gates priority works
  6. Advanced Exclusive Gate Logic

# Character Creation

# Character Art

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Add a Deluxe Puppet to your scene
  2. Adjust the puppet’s default pose
  3. Re-proportion your character
  4. Tint your puppet in Coat mode
  5. Investigate the hat box
  6. Move the hat out of the box group
  7. Add parts to your puppet

# Character Gameplay

Experience Level: advanced.

  1. Learn how to tweak the jump height of a character
  2. Make Connie Crouch
  3. Trigger a pose through button presses
  4. Animating Connie’s smash
  5. Wire a button press to the animation in a Timeline
  6. Stamping a Force Applier into the Microchip
  7. Stopping the force affecting Connie and Cuthbert

# Animation

# Action and Possession Recorders

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Animate the ledge
  2. Practise your animation skills with “retake”
  3. Tweak the action recorder to change the animation
  4. Clone and flip your ledge to make a way down
  5. Use the possession recorder to animate the helper cube
  6. Experiment with the tweaks to hone your animation

# Keyframes and Timelines

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Create your first keyframe
  2. Wire a trigger zone into your keyframe to activate it
  3. Smooth our your keyframe with sliders
  4. Edit multiple objects in your keyframe animation
  5. Use “keep changes” to make animations permanent
  6. Place a timeline in the scene
  7. Blend two keyframes on your timeline using blending
  8. Scale the keyframes for a longer time to add pauses
  9. Set your timeline’s playback mode to make it loop

# Audio Tutorials

# Sound Design

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Open Sound Mode
  2. Add a background sound
  3. Add a sound effect to the fire
  4. Add a sound to the light-up platform
  5. Connect the trigger zone to the sound
  6. Clone the platform and give it a sound
  7. Add a looping sound to the raising platform
  8. Wire up the trigger zone and movement sensor

Sound effects.

# Arranging Music

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Music in Dreams
  2. Music Timelines
  3. Using the Music Arrangement Collection
  4. Arranging Music on a Timeline
  5. Trimming and Fading Music Clips
  6. Tweaking Timelines and Music Clips

Timelines, Clips, Instruments.

# Music Performance

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Stamp a new instrument onto the timeline
  2. Perform notes
  3. Change the instrument’s key and scale
  4. Learn how to record your performance
  5. Delete the notes from the canvas and re-record the performance
  6. Record a melody using a different instrument
  7. Use the Piano Roll to edit a recording
  8. Select and clone notes to build on the melody
  9. Draw notes directly on the Piano Roll
  10. Use Freeform View to move notes around

# Cinematic Sound Design

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Preview the Timeline to play the first animation
  2. Score the collapse of the platform
  3. Add a sound for the impact
  4. Add reverb to the sound effects
  5. Add a start-up sound to the Timeline
  6. Add a stop sound to the Timeline
  7. Add a Selector to the Microchip
  8. Connect the rain and sun sounds to the Selector
  9. Learn how to use ADSR
  10. Finish scoring the scene

# Gameplay Tutorials

Gadgets, connectors, physics.

# Connectors and Physics

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Evaluate the first obstacle
  2. Get Connie across the first gap using string
  3. Get Connie across the second gap in using the piston
  4. Connect the plank using the bolt
  5. Set limits to get Connie across the third gap

Connectors, physics, grid.

# Imp Gameplay

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Make an object Movable and Grabbable by the imp
  2. Stamp a Tag gadget on the ball
  3. Tweak the Trigger Zone to detect tags
  4. Stamp a Camera and connect it to the Trigger Zone
  5. Change the Focus Distance of the Camera
  6. Change the Min and Max Imp Distance of the Camera
  7. Stamp a Grab Sensor onto the Microchip
  8. Add a hover effect to the button
  9. Use the Grab Sensor to trigger the button logic

# Emitters

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Surface Snap an Emitter gadget
  2. Connect an object to emit
  3. Tweak the settings of the emitter
  4. Connect the Trigger Zone to the Emitter
  5. Clone the onto the Fruit Launcher
  6. Stamp an animated effect
  7. Link the animated effect to an emitter
  8. Attach the watermelon to the Emitter
  9. Use Preview Invisibility to reveal the original object
  10. Add a Tag to the reference object’s logic
  11. Connect the broken block to the Emitter
  12. Use Grid Snap to align the destroyed block

# Cameras and Text

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Stamp a Camera and change its transition
  2. Edit the framing of the Camera
  3. Stamp a Text Displayer and add text
  4. Customise the look of the Text Displayer
  5. Move the new gadgets onto the Timeline
  6. Change the Aperture and Focus Distance
  7. Stamp a Dialogue Displayer
  8. Create two possible responses to Cuthbert’s dialogue
  9. Connecting or dialogue options
  10. Connect a Camera to the Dialogue Text Displayer
  11. Add close prompts to finish the conversation

# Controller Sensor

Experience Level: advanced.

  1. Scope in to Cuth-Bot and open its Microchip
  2. Stamp a Controller Sensor
  3. Change the Possession Visual
  4. Stabilise an object with a Gyroscope
  5. Stamp a Mover and tweak its gizmo
  6. Connect the Mover to the Controller Sensor
  7. Increase the strength of the Mover and set it to Local Space
  8. Create a wire with a positive and negative signal
  9. Add a Rotator and tweak its gizmo
  10. Connect the Rotator to the Controller Sensor
  11. Tweak the Rotator to refine the control

Using a controller sensor to create custom controls for a robot two-wheeled racer.

# Masterclasses

# Remixing Dreamiverse Dash

Experience Level: beginner.

  1. Get familiar with the Dreamiverse Dash game
  2. Move around the scene using the left and right sticks
  3. Customise the game using objects already in the scene
  4. Keep things neat in the scene by using guides
  5. Add more elements to the scene
  6. Animate an object in the scene using an Action Recorder
  7. Edit elements by scoping into them
  8. Control the player view with Trigger Zones and Camera Pointers
  9. Tweak the Sun & Sky and the Grade & Effects of the scene
  10. Adjust how your scene plays with the Global Settings gadget

Mm Creative Director Mark Healey shows you how to remix Dreamiverse Dash, and add your own gameplay.

# Sculpting and Level Assembly

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Play through and explore the scene
  2. Sculpt a rough level
  3. Decide on a theme for your level
  4. Sculpt a landmass block
  5. Finessing the block
  6. Making more versions of the basic block
  7. Sculpt some rocks
  8. Roughly assembling the scene
  9. Creating grasses, bushes, and plants
  10. Making some trees
  11. Making simple wooden structures
  12. Adding custom detail

# Stylistic Scene Creation

Note: details for tips

Experience Level: intermediate.

  1. Welcome to the masterclass
  2. Create your base look
  3. Create the rough layout of your scene
  4. Create a stylised sign
  5. Dress and modify the scene
  6. Make a detailed arch and wall piece
  7. Dress the scene with ribbons
  8. Create an area that’s in a different style
  9. Populate the sky with clouds
  10. Add depth with painted buildings
  11. Reflect on what we made

Mm artist Maja takes us through how she assembled a scene from whitebox to finished creation, utilising existing elements, modifying others, and creating some from scratch.

# Sculpting a Male Bust

Experience Level: advanced.

  1. Work your way around the scene
  2. Stamp the start of your sculpture
  3. Cut from your stamped shape
  4. Use Soft Blend to create the body and neck
  5. Add the nose, mouth, and chin
  6. Tweak the jaw and add ears
  7. Block out the eyes
  8. Add details around the face
  9. Add further detail to the face
  10. Define the mouth and lips
  11. Bulk out the lips
  12. Give your sculpture defined ears
  13. Give your person a defined brow
  14. Create muscle definition in the neck
  15. Add muscles to the throat
  16. Adding the final touches
  17. Create hair by smearing shapes
  18. Add facial hair to your person
  19. Add some more realistic eyes
  20. Add eyelashes and eyebrows
  21. Add some final personal touches

Mm Art Director Kareem demonstrates his technique for sculpting a male bust.

In this Masterclass we go from the basics of creating a bust, adding in detail and then finish off with some personal touches.

# How To... Videos!

# How To... Quickly Assemble a Level

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

Two parts: Adding Elements, and Bring It to Life.

# How To... Make a Squeaky Door

Experience Level: beginner.

# How To... Make a Mossy Rock

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Make a Simple Button

Experience Level: beginner.

# How To... Make Blinking Eyes

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Make a Magical Effect

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Make a Waterfall

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Make a Window

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Tidy Elements

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Use Camera Pointers

Experience Level: beginner.

# How To... Make a Forest

Experience Level: beginner.

# How To... Make it Rain

Experience Level: beginner.

# How To... Make Grass

Experience Level: beginner.

# How To... Make a First Person Character

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Make a Bounce Pad

Experience Level: beginner.

# How To... Use the Sculpture Detail Tool

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Make an Interactive Chest

Experience Level: intermediate.

# How To... Make a Looky Eye

Experience Level: intermediate.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

# How To... Make a Flappy Mouth

Experience Level: intermediate.

# How To... Create Connected Doors Between Scenes

Experience Level: intermediate.

# How To... Make a Shooty Cannon

Experience Level: intermediate.

# How To... Add Labels

Experience Level: beginner.

You can watch this tutorial on YouTube.

Learn about adding labels to your creations for VR Compatibility and more.

Play the creation in VR at least once to be able to add VR labels. If still wearing your VR headset then on first quick-save, after choosing type and category, VR and controller compatibility labels can be set.

# Modes

Contents:

Edit mode begins in Assembly Mode. Different modes allow creatino of different kinds of objects, or have tools to change objects in different ways.

To change mode, use the mode menu.

# Assembly

The main mode, allowing you to assemble everything together. The default mode.

While holding an object, hold OPTIONS button to lock the camera. This can be useful for moving an object towards or away from the camera without moving the camera with it.

# Basic Controls

To do most things in 3D space, use R2 on the DS4 or the primary trigger with the move controllers.

For example, to move an object, hover over it, hold R2, move it around, and let go of R2. Using the move controllers, use the primary trigger in the same way to move and rotate an object at the same time.

To “click” on a UI button in the menu, or to drag a UI element within a tweak menu, use Cross button.

While moving an object with the Dualshock, it will move along the axis of the grid’s orientation if the grid is not at its default orientation even if no movement guides (grid or precise move) are on.

# Shift

Many controls have a “shifted” shortcut associated with them. For example, R2 will grab and hold an object, whereas shift +R2 will clone an object and hold the clone.

When using a Dualshock or Dualsense controller, hold L1 to shift whatever controls you are using. When using the Move controllers, hold Triangle on the Secondary Move controller.

# Reel

While using the controller, hold an object with R2. Then hold OPTIONS button and use the left stick to reel the object toward and away from the camera.

While using the moves, hold an object with T button. Then hold secondary circle and twist the secondary controller to reel the object toward and away from the camera. Or, when using VR, toward and away from the imp tip.

# Translating Dualshock 4 Shortcuts to Move Controllers Shortcuts

The shortcuts and icons used in this document have titles to help translate between control schemes, but in most cases it’s easy to translate between the two.

The ”shift” button is L1 for the Dualshock 4, and secondary Triangle button for the Move controllers. And the face buttons on the Dualshock 4 Cross buttonSquare buttonTriangle buttonCircle button translate to the primary Move’s face buttons: primary Cross buttonSquare buttonTriangle buttonCircle button. (Tg)

And to toggle between modes (such as Add/Subtract) use Triangle button for the Dualshock 4 and tap the secondary sphere to the primary base. (Tg)

# Camera Controls

To change your view, use the left stick to move the camera relative to the current view (like strafing in a first-person game): left and right to move left and right, and up and down to move forwards and backwards. Holding shift while moving the left stick up or down will move up or down relative to the current camera angle. Use the right stick to rotate the camera around the imp.

Holding R1 will put you into grabcam mode. When used while not holding anything and hovering over an object, the imp will zoom over to its surface and grab it, allowing you to swing yourself around it using the sticks. Otherwise, holding R1 will let you move around relative to the imp itself. For example, this can be useful for getting closer to a shape you’re about to place in a sculpt.

Holding shift and pressing R1 while hovering over an object or window will zoom your view to that object or window.

Note: some controls change depending on the current Control Scheme setting.

# Wire Controls

To create a new wire, hover over the left or right edge of a tweak window next to a setting to reveal a small input or output tab, or an input or output nub on the side of a gadget or microchip.

Click with Cross button or R2 to create a new wire. Click again with Cross button or R2 to attach that wire to another input or output.

Note that a wire created from an output (to the right of a gadget or window) can only be attached to the input (to the left of a gadget or window). And a wire from an input can only be attached to an output.

Hovering over a wire closer to the input end will light up the input end of the wire, or closer to the output end will light up the output end of the wire.

While a wire is lit up like this, shift + R1 (similar to the grabcam zip) will zip you over to the other end of the wire.

So hovering over the input end will zip you to the output end, for example.

While a wire is lit up, shift + R2 (similar to cloning) will clone the wire, leaving you holding the same end.

For example, hovering over the input end of a wire and cloning will create a new wire coming from the same output and leave you holding the input end of the wire.

Holding shift while placing a wire will place the wire and create a clone of that wire.

Note that some gadgets will open instead of placing a cloned wire when using shift + Cross button. If shift + R2 is used instead it will place the cloned wire as expected.

When on a Microchip, Cross button will create a pin on the wire, and put the wire into a “pinned” mode. The wire will then follow straight lines from wire pin to wire pin, allowing the creator to customise the routing of the wires. (Tg)

Use Cross button and drag to pin the wire and immediately adjust the position of the pin.
Pinning multiple wires to the same point will have them stack next to each other as on a real microchip, creating a “ribbon” of routed wires. That pin will then move the corresponding pins for all the ribboned wires. (Tg)
These pins move if the outputting and inputting gadgets are being moved at the same time, but not if only one side is being moved.

When cloning more than one object connected by a wire, the wire will be cloned at the same time—connected between the new copies.

Wires use the colour of the outputting gadget. When coming from a splitter, wires will have a colour based on the value being represented. (See Wire Types.)

# Window Controls

Hold R2 to move windows around. Note, when hovering over a gadget within a window, this will move the gadget instead.

Press Cross button on the window’s title at the top to edit the gadget’s name.

There are 3 buttons on the top-right of every window:

“Save Position” will save the position and rotation of the window so that next time you open it, it will open in the same position. (Mm) When green, the window is in the same position as the one stored. When yellow, the window is in a different position to the one stored. When grey (“off”), there is no stored position.
“Pin to Screen” will attach the window to the screen itself. This allows you to move around the scene while still being able to see anything “pinned to screen.” Note that when you turn off “pin to screen,” the window will return to the in-scene location it was in before it was pinned to the screen.
“Close” closes the window. Shortcut: while hovering over the window or its gadget, shift +Circle button.

# Automatic Grouping

When holding an object and scoping in to another object, if that target object is not a group a new group will be created that contains the held object and the target object.

Connectors that were attached to the target object will reattach to the new group. Keyframes etc. will still reference the original object, not the new group. Keyframes etc. that reference the rotation of the connector will still reference the connector. (See Kinematics.) Emitters will still reference the original object, not the group. (Tg)

When a group is not referenced by an Emitter, Keyframe, etc. and it would have only a single object in it—when the other objects are deleted or scoped out of the group—the group will “collapse,” being removed entirely and leaving only that last object in place.

If that object is a sculpt or group, any connectors will now be attached to that sculpt.

# Kinematics

Note: when happens if an object with position recorded is jointed (disallowing IK)?

Kinematics is the mathematics used to find a solution to allow several joints to rotate properly.

Forward Kinematics will rotate only child objects depending on the rotation of the parent object. (Tg)

Recorded FK will indicate this by using hash marks from the top-left to the bottom-right, with a green stripe. (Tg)
Note that recording FK actually records the rotation of the joint itself, not the rotation of the object.

Inverse Kinematics will use the desired position of a child object to rotate its parent connected objects (up to 3 in a chain) to allow it, within the set constraints. (Tg)

Recorded IK will indicate this by using hash marks from top-right to bottom-left, with a yellow stripe. (Tg)
Note that only something jointed with at least 2 parent objects in the chain can use IK. (Tg)

When both IK and FK are involved in the same chain, the recorded IK will take precedence. (Tg)

Note that a keyframe that has recorded IK will only be able to record IK for that object. And a keyframe that has recorded FK will only be able to record FK for that object. (Tg)

When using the Dualshock 4 controller, R2 sets the position and uses IK to adjust parent joints. Using L2 sets the rotation of an object—or when used on a jointed object will rotate the object itself which in turn will use FK to rotate connected child objects.

When using the Move controllers, by default they will use IK. To swap between IK and FK, tap the secondary sphere to the primary base.

# Thermometer

In edit mode, there is a display in the bottom-left of the screen (by default), displaying 3 thermometers: measurements of how much memory is being used by the creation for a number of categories as small circles partically filled to indicate how much memory of that category is being used.

These category thermometers are:

Gameplay

The transform (position, etc.), and tweak menu settings, and state of all objects in the creation.

This is the only category that can change during play, when objects are created by Emitters and destroyed by Destroyers.

Graphics

Sculpt surface data, painting fleck data, and text displayer gadgets data (including similar gadgets), as well as some “shared” data between objects.

Sound

Audio data.

When a thermometer increases or decreases by 1% or more, the thermometer will pop up and display how much the category changed by.

Hovering over the thermometer will make the circles expand into bars, again partically filled for how much memory has been used. Hovering over a bar will show the category’s usage as a percentage, rounded up.

Clicking on the thermometer with Cross button will open a new view with the percentages shown up to 2 places of precision. It also has a “More Info” button.

The More Info view shows the sub-memory-limits, or “sub-thermos.”

# Max Physical Size

The maximum distance any object can exist from the origin of the scene (meaning 0,0,0 on the coordinate system, the centre of the scene) is somewhere between 5555.4 and 5555.5 meters. Any further than that and the object will be deleted, with a message saying “Object deleted - centre was too far from origin.”

You can visualise the scene’s origin by turning on the Floor Guide.

# Selection

Press Cross button while hovering over any object to select it, or deselect it if it was already selected. If you continue to hold Cross button and hover over other objects those objects will also be selected or deselected—depending on if the first object was selected or deselected.

Deselect everything you have selected by pressing Circle button. Select all objects within the current scope by double-tapping Cross button (pressing Cross button twice in quick succession). (Tg)

# Gizmo

A gizmo is something that appears when selecting some gadgets or while their tweak menu is open. It serves as an indicator for certain settings that gadget has, and by manipulating some gizmos can change those settings.

When a gadget with a location gizmo is moved into a Microchip or Timeline, the location is preserved. (Tg)

When it location is unset, the gizmo will appear just above the gadget (or its parent chip) with a move icon shown. The location will default to the centre of the front of the face of the gadget (or its chip). Move it with R2 to set its location relative to the gadget (or parent chip). (Tg)

If the location is unset and is a physics gadget (eg. Follower) the location will default to the centre of mass of the object being affected.

An arrow gizmo can be pointed in different directions, and an axes gizmo can be adjusted to change the orientation of a gadget’s behaviour, and so on.

Gizmos also work with the Grid, and can be aligned to it just like any object.

# Performance Limits

There are a number of limits put on how much heavy processing can be done in a scene. These limits will turn off features automatically so that the scene can still run, and will show a warning symbol and message while editing to let the creator know what is happening.

These warnings can be ignored, but are just letting you know that some functionality may not be working as expected. So for things like spotlight shadows, the creator may leave Dreams to do its own thing, or power different sets of lights on and off so that they have more control over how that part of rendering performance is handled.

# Camera Bookmarks

Note: can it be bottom-left?

Hover over the mode icon in the top-left of the screen to reveal the camera bookmarks list. (Tg)

The first camera bookmark in the list will be restored when going to edit mode from the creation’s cover page. If there are no camera bookmarks, the view used when last saved will be restored.

In a new creation there is one bookmark already added.

The first button Add Bookmark is enabled while not at one of the bookmarked views. Click on it to add a bookmark at the current view to the list with the thumbnail of what can be seen.

Below is a list of bookmarked views, with a thumbnail. Click on one to go to that view. If already at that view, click on the bookmark to retake a screenshot at that view.

Use shift +Square button to edit the name of the bookmark.

Use Triangle button to delete the bookmark.

This menu has the following items: Loading navigation...

Find elements in the dreamiverse and stored locally to stamp into the creation being edited.

# Tools

Various tools to help you work with objects within the creation being edited.

This menu has the following items: Loading navigation...

# Undo

Undoes the last performed action. Use undo multiple times in a row to undo multiple actions.

# Redo

Redoes the last action undone by an undo action. Multiple redo actions will redo more and more actions that were previously undone.

# Move

Use R2 or primary Trigger while hovering over an object (regardless of how far away it is from your view) to grab it. While grabbed, you can manipulate it in a number of ways. Or hold Secondary motion controller triangle button while using another tool to use the move tool temporarily.

Move the object with the imp or by moving your view. Using up/down on the left stick will move the object away from or toward the camera to a certain point, and then the entire view will move back or forward. Hold R2 more lightly for such moves to have less effect; this can be very useful for finessing the position of something.

Note, if you’re holding an object with R2 and you scope into a group, that object will now be inside that group. Same for grabbing something within a group and scoping out of that group. (Mm)

Also, if you scope into an object that isn’t currently grouped while holding another object, this will automatically create a group that includes the “scoped-in” object and the “held” object.

In most cases, you should use this technique to add individual objects to a larger group, rather than the other way around. If you hold a group and scope-in to a non-grouped object, it will create a new group, which contains the target object and the group you were holding. So now, to get into that original group, you will need to scope in twice. Do this again and again and you can end up with many many layers of groups before you can manipulate the object you wanted to move in the first place.

With the DS4, hold L2 to rotate an object by twisting the controller, or using the sticks.

The rotations are made relative to the camera angle you’re viewing the object from. The explanation below talks about different parts of the object relative to how you see the object.

Pushing up on either stick will tilt the object’s top away from you. Pushing down on either stick will tilt the object’s top towards you. For the left stick, pushing left will tilt the object’s left away from you, and pushing it right will tilt the object’s left towards you. For the right stick, pushing left will tilt the object’s left down, and pushing it right will tilt the object’s left up.

You can rotate an object while holding it, or when just hovering over it.

Pressing Up button or Down button, or holding secondary Circle button and twisting the controller, will scale the object.

Click in the left stick (L3) to flip the object horizontally relative to your view, or the click right stick (R3) to flip the object vertically. (Tg) Or hold secondary Square button to show arrows above the controller, then flick the secondary move controller left/right/up/down to flip along that direction.

Flip an object by pressing L3 or R3 while holding it.

Or with the moves, while holding the object with the primary trigger, hold secondary Square button and arrows will appear. Flick the secondary controller in a direction and it will flip along one of those arrows.

Touch the touchpad and move your finger around to rotate the object around the point you’re holding it. Double-tap secondary Circle button and then grab the object with secondary T button to rotate around.

While using the move tool, hold shift while grabbing an object to clone it and hold the clone instead of the original object. Then you may let go of shift. While holding a clone, you may multi-clone the object.

If an object is moved in this way while time is paused, that object’s initial position will be set to where it was moved to. This means object can be made movable, time is run to allow it to settle naturally in the scene, then pause time and “touch” that object to lock it in to that position... and then make it non-movable again. (Tg)

# Stretch

Use R2 or the primary trigger to drag a sculpt that is jointed with a ball joint or bolt connector as the child of another sculpt, which is in turn jointed with a connector as the child of another sculpt. While dragging, the “middle” sculpt will stretch and deform. (Tg)

While dragging, scale the object up or down to deform the end of the middle sculpt larger or smaller at the connected end.

Usually used on puppet limbs to change the frame of the puppet.

Can also drag the sides of Ruler gadgets.

# Clone

Grab an object to make a clone of it and hold the clone. While holding the object, any move controls work on the held clone.

To clone an object, hold shift and move it. You will now be holding a copy of what you were hovering over, while the original stays in place.

To remove the “live clone” setting from a sculpt, press Triangle button on that sculpt while using the clone tool. (Tg)

Tip: If you want to make a clone in the exact same spot, turn on grid mode. Now, you’d have to move your hand a lot to accidentally move the copy before placing it. (Mm)

To multi-clone, press up and down (or secondary Cross button and Square button) while holding the copy to add clones either between the new copy and the original or beyond the new copy. When adding between, the change in transformation between the original and clone will be subdivided for each multi-clone. When adding beyond, the change in transformation will be added for each multi-clone. Note that change in rotation is applied before position, meaning if you rotate an object and move it, it will bow out in a path towards the final position rather than simply rotating in place linearly.

# Tweak Selected

Opens the tweak menu of an object being hovered over. (Tg) Also works while hovering over an object’s window. (Tg)

Any setting changes (barring some exceptions) made using the tweak menu will be applied to all selected objects of the same type as the tweak menu. (Mm)

(For more information on how settings can be manipulated, see Settings.)

# Delete

Delete the object from the scene. If used on a selected object, all selected objects will be deleted.

# Hide

When active, all objects in the scene will turn a white colour. Click things with R2 to turn them yellow. When you go out of this tool with Circle button, anything that was marked as yellow will be hidden—regardless of whether “preview invisibility” is turned off or not. (Tg)

Note that an object being marked as “hidden” in this way only has an effect on its visibility when in edit mode. This is particularly useful when working on some part of the scene that is normally hidden behind other objects.

Use shift +R2 to hide or unhide everything except what you are hovering over.

# Freeze

When active, all objects in the scene will turn a white colour. Click things with R2 to turn them blue. When you go out of this tool with Circle button, anything that was marked as blue will be “frozen.” (Tg)

Note that any gadgets surface-snapped to the frozen object will also be frozen.

Frozen objects cannot be changed in any way. When attempting to change a frozen object, it flashes blue to remind you of why you cannot change it. You can see this in action in the homeworld and in the tutorial scenes.

Note that an object being “frozen” in this way only has effect on attempting to edit it. When time is running, that object can still move and change through other means; just not by direct user manipulation.

Use shift +R2 to hide or unhide everything except what you are hovering over.

# Sculpture Detail

Use the sculpture detail tool to lower the detail of a sculpt to make it cheaper on the thermometer. Things that are more detailed than other things in the scene will be more red, and things that are less detailed that other things in the scene will be more blue. (Tg) (Pk) Note that paint is not affected by the sculpture detail tool, so their visuals will not be affected by this colouring. (Pk)

A sculpture’s resolution (detail) dictates the minimum visual looseness. (Mm) Because of this, if you have metallic or shiny sculptures, lowering their detail can affect the reflections in the surface of the object, making them less crisp and clear. (Pk)

This also means that this is a more efficient way of making a sculpt appear looser and its flecks larger. (Tg)

While in reduce mode, use shift +R2 to reduce the most detailed sculpt in the scene.

# Modes

Modes for creating and editing different kinds of objects, and for using certain functions.

This menu has the following items: Loading navigation...

# Sculpt

(See Modes > Sculpt.)

Starts a new sculpt.

# Paint

(See Modes > Paint.)

Starts a new painting.

# Coat

(See Modes > Coat.)

# Style

(See Modes > Style.)

# Effects

(See Modes > Effects.)

# Sound

(See Modes > Sound.)

# Test

(See Modes > Test.)

# Update

(See Modes > Update.)

# Photo

(See Modes > Photo.)

Goes into photo mode, with the added option to show gadgets and windows with Square button.

# Animate

Animation gadgets and settings.

This menu has the following items: Loading navigation...

# Action Recorder

(See Gadget > Action Recorder.)

When a new action recorder is stamped, it will go into recording mode.

# Keyframe

(See Gadget > Keyframe.)

When a new keyframe is stamped, it will go into recording mode. (Tg)

# Timeline

(See Gadget > Timeline.)

Creates a new timeline in “realtime” mode, and Timeline Snap off.

# Record Possession

(See Gadget > Possession Recorder.)

After stamping a new Possession Recorder gadget, record mode is started.

# Mic On/Off

When on, audio will be recorded from the microphone while recording with the action recorder or possession recorder. This will result in a timeline that contains the recorded audio and a possession recorder. (Mm)

# Gadgets

Contains all gadgets and connectors.

They are grouped together in collapsible sub-menus. Use Cross button on a category to collapse any other open categories and expand that category. Use Circle button on a category to collapse it.

This menu has the following items: Loading navigation...

# Sensors & Input

Contains: Trigger Zone, Tag, Wireless Transmitter, Wireless Receiver, Controller Sensor, Grab Sensor, Movement Sensor, Angle Sensor, Rotation Sensor, Laser Scope, Impact Sensor, Look Cursor Sensor, Signal Generator, Switch, and Value Slider.

# Logic & Processing

Contains: Randomiser, Counter, AND Gate, OR Gate, Exclusive OR Gate, NOT Gate, Selector, Exclusive Gate, Signal Manipulator, Timer, Calculator, Microchip, Node, Splitter, Combiner, Variable, and Variable Modifier.

# Movers & Output

Contains: Gyroscope, Mover, Advanced Mover, Follower, Rotator, Advanced Rotator, Look At Rotator, Rocket Rotator, Teleporter, Force Applier, Emitter, Destroyer, Health Manager, Health Modifier, Text Displayer, Dialogue Text Displayer, Subtitle Displayer, Number Displayer, and Rumbler.

# Gameplay Gear

Contains: Checkpoint, Prize Bubble, Doorway, Auto Guide, Global Settings, Score, Score Modifier, Puppet, the Blank Puppet Collection including sliding platformer and basic puppets, Puppet Interface, Head/Camera Tracker, and Hand/Imp Tracker.

# Cameras & Lighting

Contains: Camera, Camera Pointer, Camera Shaker, Light, Fog, Sun & Sky, Grade & Effects, Wiper, and Ruler.

# Connectors

Contains: Ball Joint, Bolt, Piston, Slider, String, and Elastic.

# Sound

The Speaker and Master Mixer gadgets are contained here, as well as multiple versions of the Reverb, Delay, and Channel gadgets.

# Guides

Contains a number of guides to help position things while editing the scene.

This menu has the following items: Loading navigation...

# Obey Auto Guides

Unavailable:

in sculpt and paint modes.

While moving objects that contain an auto guide, the auto-guide settings will be obeyed. (Pk)

Auto-guide gadgets are taken into account while their parent object is held.

# Surface Snap

Note that Tentacle Snap will be turned off when turning this feature on.

Objects will snap to the surface of sculpt objects the imp is hovering over within the scene (not just within the same object). New paint flecks will stick to paint flecks within the same painting object, but as if the flecks have no ruffle, impasto, looseness, or stretch.

While sculpting, the point that snaps is the grab point of the shape. While painting, the point that snaps is the centre of the fleck. (Pk)

When adding edits to a painting, surface snap will also orient the fleck to the orientation of the surface, as if to lie flat on it. When creating a new painting with surface-snap, the orientation of the painting itself will be perpendicular to the surface, meaning kaleidoscope edits will be rotated across a plane that sticks out of the surface as opposed to across the surface.

# Tentacle Snap

Note that Surface Snap will be turned off when turning this feature on.

Works similarly to Surface Snap, but only the start of the edit is snapped. As the edit is smeared etc., it will no longer snap to things the imp hovers over. (Pk)

# Grid Snap

When editing a new creation, the grid will reset itself to a spacing of 1, and the default scene orientation.

The grid is represented as dots at each intersection. (Pk) These dots will be displayed around the middle of the screen, fading out in a circle as it nears the edges.

This grid of dots will only be shown for the axis you are facing. For example, if you’re facing down, you’ll see a grid of dots across the floor. If you’re looking along the X axis, you’ll see a grid of dots in front of you.

This scale will default back to 1, relative to the object itself, whenever you open a creation for editing. While the grid is activated, two new buttons will be shown next to the grid menu item to allow you to adjust this scale. (Pk) They are the following:

Finer

halves the distance between the dots in both directions.

Coarser

doubles the distance between the dots in both directions.

The shortcut to adjust the size of the grid is shift +Up button and shift +Down button on the DS4. The moves must use the menu opinons.

When moving something on the grid, the green plumb line shows exactly how much you’ve moved it. (Mm)

While using the moves, the imp reach will affect the scale of the grid. So zooming in with the moves will get you closer to what you’re trying to line up, and make the grid more fine to help you line it up also. (Mm)

While holding an object, press Triangle button to align it to the current grid and snap it to the nearest grid point. (Mm) (Tg)

Hover your primary imp over an object and press shift +Triangle button to realign the grid to that object’s orientation. (Tg) The grid will now be based on the one used when creating that object, as well as its current scale and rotation. (Pk) If the grid has been set to something other than the default, it will be used when moving objects around while the grid is off. (Tg)

This is great for flipping or rotating cloned objects in-place to add variation to how they look in the scene. (Tg)

Do this while not hovering over an object to reset to the world grid, (Mm) (Pk) or press the reset grid context button.

Note that UI elements such as tweak menus that aren’t “pinned to screen” will also be affected by the grid.

When grid snap is off, the grid’s orientation is still used. Precise move follows the orientation. And using Triangle button while holding an object will orient it to 90 degrees to the grid’s current orientation.

# Stay Upright

Whenever grabbing an object or window, it will be rotated to be “upright.” For sculpts and paintings, the “upright” orientation depends on the orientation of the grid when the first edit was made within the object. For groups, they store the grid position and orientation when they are created and that orientation is used as the “upright” of that object.

This is very useful to keep windows straight on the screen. (Mm)

When on, reveals a menu switch for Right Angles. When on, this allows you to rotate objects but only to right angles of the upright orientation. (Jj)

# Mirror

Only available in sculpt and paint modes. (Pk)

All edits added will be reflected in a plane onto the other side of the sculpt. These mirrored edits will be previewed before committing each edit. The centre of the mirror is defined by the first edit made in the sculpt. (Mm) (Pk) Note that existing edits will not be affected by the current mirror settings when cloning or moving them, but will preserve the mirror settings they had when they were made.

The mirror plane is dictated by the origin of the object, which is set when the first edit is made. The plane faces the camera, but uses the “upright” of the object. (Tg)

An edit that was made with the mirror active will always be tied to those mirror settings for moving, manipulating, or cloning later. (Pk)

While kaleidoscope mode is also active, each iteration is mirrored. (Pk) So if you have a kaleidoscope of 4, with mirror mode on, stamping a single cube will create a total of 8 new cubes.

While active, two new menu switches are revealed:

Clipped Mirror

(Sculpt Mode only) will ignore any part of an edit that overlaps onto the other side of the mirror.

Hide Mirror

will hide the plane of reflection. (Mm)

# Precise Move

Unavailable:

when the grid is activated. (Pk)

Gives you much more control over angles when moving or rotating objects. (Tg)

When activated, two new menu switches appear. (Pk) These are the following:

Local Space

allows moves and rotations relative to the grid the object used when created, as well as its current scale and rotation. This is similar to re-aligning the grid to the object before going into precise move mode. (Pk)

Grid Space

(default) allows moves and rotations relative to the current grid. This is selected by default when a creation is loaded.

When moving an object, arrows are displayed indicating the dimension relative to the grid. If you move the object in two axes, white lines come out from those two arrows to the current position of the object. You cannot move an object in three dimensions at the same time while in this mode. (Pk)

Hold shift while moving to lock the current axes in. (Tg) While still holding shift, hover the imp over another surface to move the point being dragged to the point being hovered over along those locked-in axes. (Tg)

When rotating an object, an arrow and arc are displayed, as well as a readout of how many degrees (rounded) from the initial orientation the object has been rotated. You cannot rotate an object around more than one axis at the same time using precise move. (Pk)

Hold shift while rotating to lock the current rotational axes in, and snap to 15 degree increments when close to those points.

# Kaleidoscope

Available:

when in sculpt and paint modes.

Added edits will be repeated, rotating each iteration around the “upright” axis at the centre point of the first edit made in the sculpt or painting. (Mm) (Pk) (Tg)

Edits will not be affected by the current kaleidoscope settings when cloning or moving them, but will preserve the kaleidoscope settings they had when they were made. (Pk)

The number of iterations is shown as a number in the bottom-right corner of the kaleidoscope menu icon. The last-used number of iterations is remembered per object, and defaults to 5 in new objects. (Tg)

When active, two new buttons are revealed:

Increase

increases the number of iterations.

Decrease

decreases the number of iterations.

An edit that was made with the kaleidoscope active will always be tied to that kaleidoscope effect for moving or manipulating after the fact.

# Studio Lighting

When on, lighting is not taken into account when rendering the scene. All objects are shown with their real colours, as unaffected by lighting. Shadows are not cast. The sky becomes a light grey. This can be useful if you’re designing a dark area, but want to actually see what’s going on for object placement, etc. (Pk)

Note that all objects providing lighting (eg. glowing objects) remain their normal colour.

# Floor

When on, shows a translucent floor grid from the origin of the scene grid, as well as a Circle button around the centre of the scene. Useful to have a visual reference for placing things or orienting yourself within your scene.

# Show/Hide

A number of switches that makes different aspects of the scene visible or invisible.

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# Preview Invisibility

On by default. When on, invisible objects will not be shown. When off, invisible objects will be shown, and powered off sculpts and paintings will be shown as transparent.

# Electronics

When off, hides all gadgets apart from Lights, Cameras, Grades, and Sun & Sky gadgets.

When off, a second option to Cameras and lighting show/hide lights and cameras separately is revealed. When that setting is off, all gadgets are hidden.

After placing a hidden type of gadget, this setting is automatically turned on to allow it to be seen.

# Rulers

When off, hides all rulers. (See Ruler#gadget-ruler.)

# Zones

When on, shows all zones even if their gadget is not selected or tweaked.

# Connectors

When on, shows connectors. When a connector is added, this is turned on automatically.

# X-Ray

When on, all gadgets and windows are shown even when obscured by other non-gadget objects.

# Thermometer

When on, the thermometer will be shown at all times inste